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The Knowledge Hub for the Settlement Sector in Ontario
Updated: 1 year 10 weeks ago

Experts and Immigrant Entrepreneurs Share Tips with Newcomers on Building a Successful Business

Thu, 2016-06-02 11:07

A networking event for Canadian immigrants who are seeking to become entrepreneurs was organized by the Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council (TRIEC), through its Professional Immigrant Networks (PINs) program.

“Newcomer Start-ups: Building a successful business,” aimed to provide immigrants with information on programs and services that can support them to start their own businesses, to inspire them through stories of successful immigrants and to give them opportunities to build connections.

Access some of these resources at the TRIEC’s Immigrant Entrepreneurship page.

 

Enactus Ryerson’s Project Welcome Helps Hundreds of Newcomer Entrepreneurs

Thu, 2016-06-02 10:57

Enactus Ryerson’s Project Welcome is dedicated to helping hundreds of newcomers that arrive in Canada each year. At Project Welcome, they provide newcomers foundational business and financial knowledge to not only help with adjusting to life in Canada, but to leave a lasting impact. By having access to valuable education, training, resources and mentorship, participants can turn their entrepreneurial ideas into a reality – free of charge.

Business Focus

While newcomers arrive to Canada with valuable skills in a broad range of fields, they are often forced into lower-paid jobs that do not match their potential, in order to survive in the Canadian economy. Statistically-speaking, however, 20 per cent of newcomers are interested in starting businesses upon arrival to Canada, but lack access to the tools and knowledge needed to operate a successful business in Canada.

By offering valuable services to newcomers with high entrepreneurial spirits, Project Welcome aims to help newcomers take their ideas to the next level. By starting their own businesses with hands-on training and real life experience, newcomers will not only be able to contribute their own expertise to the Canadian society, but also be empowered to become active and engaged leaders in the business world.

Services

Financial Literacy Education: Project Welcome offers practical financial literacy modules that will help newcomers master their finances and easily integrate into Canada. Some of our modules include currency exchange, living costs in Canada, budgeting, banking, credit, paying for school, and taxes.

Business Education: Project Welcome offers various events and hands on workshops led by industry professionals focused on real-world skills and opportunities to help participants start and grow their businesses in Canada.

Tax Clinic:  Need help with filing tax returns? No problem! Project Welcome can help newcomers, refugees, and permanent residents file basic tax returns.

Mentorship and Resources: Ready to start or grow your business? Project Welcome offers trained coaches who work with newcomers on a one-on-one basis to help them take their business ideas to the next level. Some of our services include assistance with creating business plans, networking, marketing, funding, legal aid, industry analysis and more. We also provide one on one mentorship to help with adjusting to life in Canada.

Ryerson University and the Region of Peel Survey on Immigrant Social Mobility

Thu, 2016-06-02 10:52

The Diversity Institute at Ryerson University and the Region of Peel are conducting a research survey to identify key factors that positively impact the success and long-term settlement of first and second generation immigrants living in Peel Region. This study will inform a strategy to improve settlement support services available to immigrants. Participants will receive a $10 gift card upon completion of the survey.

Take the survey.

Recipients of the David C. Onley Award for Leadership in Accessibility

Thu, 2016-06-02 09:32

The annual award — named for Ontario’s 28th Lieutenant Governor — recognizes individuals and organizations that have gone above and beyond to raise awareness of accessibility, while improving the lives of people with disabilities in their communities. Celebrating the work of this year’s winners helps promote the benefits of accessibility and nurtures a culture of inclusion across the province.

Her Honour the Honourable Elizabeth Dowdeswell, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, presented the awards today alongside the Honourable David C. Onley. Dr. Helena Jaczek, Minister of Community and Social Services, delivered the award citations on behalf of Brad Duguid, Minister of Economic Development, Employment and Infrastructure.

The recipients include:

  • Linda Crabtree of St. Catharines, who received the Role Model Award for her pioneering work to raise awareness of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and improve accessibility throughout the Niagara region.
  • Maayan Ziv of Richmond Hill, who received the Youth Leadership Award for her activism and social innovation that uses crowdsourcing to pinpoint the accessibility status of locations on an interactive online map.
  • Mark Wafer of Ashburn, who received the Employee Engagement Award for hiring more than 130 people with disabilities and promoting the business case for accessibility to companies, labour organizations and governments across Canada.
  • Eight organizations from across Ontario, who received the Champion Award for increasing accessibility in their communities.
Quick Facts

  • The David C. Onley Award for Leadership in Accessibility was created in 2014 to honour the province’s first Lieutenant Governor with a physical disability.
  • Mr. Onley served as the 28th Lieutenant Governor of Ontario and adopted accessibility as the overarching theme of his mandate.
Background Information

Additional Resources

New Victims Web Portal Launched During Victims and Survivors of Crime Week

Thu, 2016-06-02 09:28

As part of the Victims and Survivors of Crime Week, Public Safety Canada announced that as of June 1, victims of crime now have more accessible information about the federally supervised offender who harmed them and additional ways to participate in the parole process.

The Victims Portal is a new secure online portal that allows registered victims, and/or their named representatives, to access services and information.

In addition, victims registered with the Correctional Service of Canada or the Parole Board of Canada (PBC) will now:

  • have access to information about an offender’s progress in relation to his or her correctional plan;
  • have access to a current photo of the offender prior to certain releases;
  • have access to a more meaningful participation in the corrections and conditional release system. Victims now have the ability to listen to an audio recording of a parole hearing if they do not attend it;
  • be consulted by the PBC prior to removing or changing certain conditions that were placed on an offender’s release to enhance their safety.

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Mobilité Francophone to Bring More Newcomers to Francophone Minority Communities Outside of Quebec

Thu, 2016-06-02 09:24

Starting today, Canadian employers hiring skilled French-speaking temporary workers from abroad who want to work in Francophone minority communities outside of Quebec will be exempt from the Labour Market Impact Assessment. This will make it easier for employers to hire them.

Before launching Mobilité Francophone, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada consulted and collaborated with Francophone minority communities and organizations across Canada to ensure that the new temporary work permit stream of the International Mobility Program aligns with the communities’ interests and needs.

People working in Canada with a Mobilité Francophone temporary work permit will be able to stay in Canada long enough to acquire valuable Canadian work experience. This will help them qualify for permanent residency programs and increase the likelihood that they will be invited to apply for permanent residence in the Express Entry system.

Mobilité Francophone is designed for foreign skilled workers who have been recruited through a Francophone immigration promotional event coordinated between the federal government and Francophone minority community stakeholders and who are destined to work in a province or territory outside of Quebec.

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Rural and Remote Access to Justice Infographic

Thu, 2016-06-02 09:15

The Canadian Forum on Civil Justice, in consultation with the Rural and Remote Access to Justice Boldness Project, has created an infographic based on some of the key findings from the Rural and Remote Access to Justice Literature Review. This infographic provides an overview of the unique access to justice challenges experienced by Canadians in rural and remote settings and presents several recommendations for improving access to legal services and information in rural and remote areas.

Access the Rural and Remote Access to Justice infographic.

Online Financial Literacy Training Course for Youth in Care to Launch Fall 2016

Wed, 2016-06-01 16:55

Prosper Canada is partnering with the Children’s Aid Foundation (CAF) to adapt the Centre for Financial Literacy’s financial literacy facilitator training course for youth who have been in the care of Canada’s child welfare system. With support from Element Financial, the CAF is preparing to launch the Youth Online Financial Literacy Training course in Fall 2016.

The Children’s Aid Foundation, with support from the Element Financial Youth Capital Program, is implementing a program aimed at helping young people transitioning out of foster care to complete their educational goals, become financially empowered, and build skills and experience in employment preparation and entrepreneurship. As part of this program, the Children’s Aid Foundation is providing funding to Prosper Canada to adapt five modules from Prosper Canada’s existing tool (the Prosper Canada Centre for Financial Literacy online financial literacy facilitator training course) for youth who have been in the care of Canada’s child welfare system.

The five modules chosen for adaptation are:

  • Budgeting
  • Banking
  • Savings
  • Credit
  • Debt

Prosper Canada has partnered with Seneca College’s Centre for Flexible Learning (cFLEX) and the Ontario Council for Agencies Serving Immigrants (OCASI) for technical development and web hosting of the modules. The Children’s Aid Foundation will collaborate with the Pape Adolescent Resource Centre (PARC) to conduct community-based piloting of at least one of the adapted modules as well as incorporating feedback from the adaptation of the course.

Prosper Canada and the Children’s Aid Foundation look forward to launching the online tool in fall 2016.

For more information about this project, please email info@prospercanada.org.

Phase 3 of the Financial Literacy for Newcomers Project

Wed, 2016-06-01 16:48

Prosper Canada aims to ensure newcomers have the best chance of succeeding financially in Canada. With continued funding from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, they are increasing their impact over the next year through Phase 3 of the Financial Literacy for Newcomers project.

This project builds on the work conducted in Phase 1 and 2. The project aims to provide financial literacy training to 192 staff at settlement agencies and support the delivery and evaluation of financial literacy courses to 1,125 newcomers. Newcomer serving organizations will have a strong community of practice, research evidence and online tools and resources to support their work as a result.

Access more information.

Ontario Passed Legislation to Increase Recycling, Create Jobs, Fight Climate Change

Wed, 2016-06-01 13:59

Currently, Ontario is producing too much waste, and not recycling enough. Over eight million tonnes of waste is sent to landfill each year. Absolute greenhouse gas emissions from Ontario’s waste have risen by 25 per cent between 1990 and 2012 as the amount of waste disposed in landfills has increased.

To help divert more waste from landfill, the province has passed the Waste-Free Ontario Act that will:

  • encourage innovation in recycling processes and require producers to take full responsibility for their products and packaging
  • lower recycling costs and give consumers access to more convenient recycling options
  • help fight climate change by reducing greenhouse gas pollution that results from the landfilling of products that could otherwise be recycled or composted
  • overhaul Waste Diversion Ontario into the Resource Productivity and Recovery Authority, a strong oversight body with new compliance and enforcement powers that will oversee the new approach and existing waste diversion programs until transition is complete.

The province will also be finalizing its draft Strategy for a Waste-Free Ontario: Building the Circular Economy within three months of the legislation coming into effect. The strategy outlines Ontario’s vision for a zero waste future and proposed plan to implement the legislation.

Quick Facts

  • Every 1,000 tonnes of waste diverted from landfill generates seven full-time jobs, $360,000 in wages (paying above the provincial average) and $711,000 in GDP.
  • Every year in Canada, an estimated $1 billion in valuable resources is lost to landfill.
  • Eventually the Waste-Free Ontario Act will eliminate industry funding organizations such as the Ontario Tire Stewardship and Ontario Electronic Stewardship.
  • The Blue Box program is available in about 95 per cent of Ontario households and keeps approximately 65 per cent of residential printed paper and packaging from landfills.
Additional Resources

Making It Work! How to Effectively Manage Maternity Leave Career Transitions

Wed, 2016-06-01 13:53

Making It Work! How to Effectively Manage Maternity Leave Career Transitions: An Employer’s Guide was developed for anyone who employs, leads, manages, trains, coaches or supports pregnant, adoptive and parenting women at work, including but not limited to HR professionals, managers, business owners and career practitioners and coaches. This user-friendly manual will equip you to go beyond legislated requirements and take a proactive, positive approach to managing maternity leave career transitions.

Women make up approximately 50% of Canada’s labour force and account for 58% of post-secondary graduates. Of the working women who do become mothers, 90% will take a maternity leave. However, 36% of new mothers feel that taking maternity leave negatively impacts their opportunity for promotions, career development and career progression. Every workplace can benefit from learning about leading and promising practices for facilitating maternity leave career transitions and women’s career development as a whole.

The guide covers:

  • Redefining career development, progression and advancement
  • Before, during and after maternity leave (e.g. career dialogues, comeback coaching, return-to-work plans)
  • Customizing career plans with flexible work options
  • Considerations for diverse populations (e.g. adoptive mothers, new immigrant mothers, same-sex mothers)
  • 15 low-/no-cost employer strategies to facilitate employee engagement

Written by a team of workplace psychologists and career development experts at Canada Career Counselling and published by CERIC, the goal of this guidebook, along with the forthcoming employee version (Making It Work! How to Successfully Navigate Maternity Leave Career Transitions: An Employee’s Guide) is to allow you to understand and address obstacles that prevent your organization and working mothers from realizing their potential.

Access the guide.

Video to Help Families on Divorce and Separation: Where to Start

Wed, 2016-06-01 13:47

This video guides families going through divorce or separation to a range of free family justice tools and products available on the Justice Canada website.

Study: Immigrants’ Initial Firm Allocation and Earnings Growth, 1999 to 2012

Wed, 2016-06-01 10:08

A new study uses Statistics Canada’s new Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database to examine the differences in the earnings trajectories of immigrants, according to their initial allocation to low-, medium-low-, or high-paying firms.

The benefit of initial employment in high-paying firms remained even after accounting for individual demographic and human capital factors.

For example, immigrant men first employed in low-paying firms earned almost $11,000 less in the first year after landing than their counterparts in high-paying firms. After 14 years in Canada, the earnings gap between these groups was $8,600 despite employment transitions during the intervening years. Similarly, the earnings difference between immigrant women initially employed in low-paying firms and those initially employed in high-paying firms was approximately $6,000 in the first year after landing and $5,500 in the 14th year after landing.

Furthermore, the returns of earnings to educational attainment and knowledge of English or French were larger in both the short and long term among immigrants initially employed in high-paying firms than among those first employed in low-paying firms.

Products

The research study “Immigrants’ Initial Firm Allocation and Earnings Growth,” which is part of the Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series (Catalogue number11F0019M), is now available from the Browse by key resource module of our website under Publications.

Improving the School-to-Work Transitions of Youth in Canada: A Scoping Review

Wed, 2016-06-01 10:00

Context

In Canada, the youth unemployment rate doubles the adult rate. The rate of underemployment has grown in the last 20 years and currently 30% of youth with jobs in Canada are underemployed.
Employed youth under 30 are increasingly working in precarious work or non-permanent jobs (i.e., jobs that are temporary, contract, part-time, low paid and low skilled). The number of 15-29 years olds working in these conditions has nearly doubled from 6.9% in 1997 to 11.6% in 2011 (Foster, 2012). Canada has the greatest proportion of degree holders earning poverty-rate incomes within member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD). According to the OECD, 18% of Canadian university graduates are working in jobs where they earn at or below the poverty line (OECD, Education at a Glance, 2014). In a recent survey of Canadian Millennials, 43% of 30-33 year olds remain reliant on their parents for financial support and 29% of those aged 25-29 still live with their parents (Carrick, 2014).

Underemployment is not just impacting the ability of Canadian youth to finance the milestones of adulthood; it is impacting their mental health as well. Recent studies have found a rise in stress and anxiety disorders among Canada’s youth. In a national survey of youth aged 18-24, nearly 90% reported feeling uncomfortable levels of stress (Sun Life, 2012). When asked why they were feeling so stressed, 86% in this age group attributed the stress to underemployment (Sun Life, 2012). Many are turning to the mental health system for formalized supports. From 2013 to 2014, an Ontario-based mental health facility reported a 371% increase in youth presenting with anxiety disorders, 158% increase in mood disorders and 150% increase in youth with suicidality and emotional dysregulation (Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre, 2014).

Other research in the area of mental health suggests that this may be reflective of a more widespread trend. The social, psychological and economic costs of underemployment and the rise of poorly paid precarious work are significantly impacting young Canadians and the Canadian economy. As an indicator of the impact of poor transitions, the Chamber of Commerce, a national body representing business nationally, stated in its report, A Battle We Can’t Afford to Lose (2014), that improving the pathways for youth from education to employment is one of national importance, if not, a national emergency.

The Scoping Review

In the fall of 2015, The Canadian Career Development Foundation (CCDF) undertook this scoping review to examine how to support better school-to-work transitions for youth – those 6 Canadian Career Development Foundation who had left school prior to graduation, who went directly to the labour market after high school graduation and those who had graduated from a post-secondary education program.

The main objectives of this project were to identify what is needed to improve school-to-work transitions of Canadian youth and identify research/programming/policy gaps for future project considerations.

Access the full report.

Supports in Crisis Counselling for LGBTQ2S Youth

Tue, 2016-05-31 12:04

Premier Kathleen Wynne announced this major investment today in Toronto. The drop-in centre, run by Egale Canada Human Rights Trust, provides an array of mental health and other services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer and two-spirited (LGBTQ2S) young people. These services include crisis intervention, mental health and addictions counselling, referrals to housing, and other community supports and culturally sensitive services for Indigenous youth.

The investment aims to help deliver on Ontario’s priority to target youth homelessness, as well as its plan to end chronic homelessness in 10 years. LGBTQ2S youth experience far higher rates of homelessness than other young people. The government’s Expert Advisory Panel on Homelessness reported that LGBTQ2S youth often avoid seeking help from services for homeless people because of concerns about homophobia and transphobia.

Quick Facts

  • LGBTQ2S youth make up 25 to 40 per cent of homeless youth, far higher than their five to 10 per cent share of the youth population.
  • Many LGBTQ2S youth face violence and harassment in schools, families and communities that contributes to much higher rates of abuse, addiction, suicide, and poor mental and physical health than among other young people.
  • Egale Canada Human Rights Trust, founded in 1995, is Canada’s only national charity promoting LGBTQ2S human rights through research, education and community engagement.
Additional Resources

eBulletin May 2016 Pathways to Prosperity

Tue, 2016-05-31 11:38

The links to both the English and French versions of the May 2016 issue of the Pathways to Prosperity eBulletin are now available.
Feel free to pass these along to anyone else who may be interested.

In this issue:

  • Call for Proposals for Projects Related to the Pathways to Prosperity’s National Themes
  • New Report: The Study-Migration Pathway: Understanding the Factors that Influence the Employment and Retention of Students as Regulated Health Professionals in Canada
  • New Report: Overview of Secondary Migration of Immigrants to Canada
  • Graduate Student – Faculty Workshop on Migration-Related Research
  • FactSheet: Immigrant Taxfilers Reporting Wage Earnings by Sex and by Year of Landing
  • 10th Day of Reflection on Francophone Immigration: Time for a Review of Achievements and a Glance at the Coming Decade
  • New Book: Dynamiques familiales, socio-juridiques et citoyennes dans la migration: Regard entrelacés “Nord-Sud” sur les réseaux transnationaux
  • Creating Inclusive Classrooms: Supporting Students Who Have Experienced Trauma
  • Immigration in the News – Top Stories of the Past Month
  • Recent Grants
  • People on the Move
  • Recent and Upcoming Presentations
  • Recent and Upcoming Publications
  • Tony Fang Appointed as a Co-investigator to the Pathways to Prosperity Partnership

If you are interested in receiving more detailed information about P2P project, please contact Sonali at communications@p2pcanada.ca.

Special Measures to Support Those Affected by the Fort McMurray Wildfires

Tue, 2016-05-31 10:23
Special measures are now in place to support those affected by the wildfires, including priority processing and free replacement of Canadian citizenship and immigration documents, as well as extension of temporary resident status and the waiving of certain requirements for visitors, workers and students.These measures complement the special assistance measures put in place on May 16, 2016, for the issuance and replacement of Canadian passports and travel documents. See Notice: Alberta wildfires special assistance measures for passports and travel documents.
Notice to affected residents
As a result of the wildfires in Fort McMurray and surrounding areas, citizenship and immigration documents belonging to Canadians, permanent residents, protected persons and temporary residents may have been lost, damaged or destroyed. In addition, work and study permit holders may be unable to immediately continue their work or studies.To support those affected, the Minister approved special measures to waive some fees and other specific requirements for Canadian citizens, permanent residents and temporary residents.The following documents may be replaced at no cost and on an urgent priority basis until August 3, 2016:

  • citizenship certificates
  • permanent resident cards
  • permanent resident travel document (paper or electronic)
  • confirmation of permanent residence
  • verification of status
  • work permits
  • study permits
  • visitor records

Fees for study permit extensions and work permit extensions are also waived until August 3, 2016.

In addition, the following measures are now in place:

  • Work permit holders whose work permit is expiring may continue to work under the same terms as the expiring work permit if they apply for a new work permit by August 3, 2016. Open work permit holders may work for any employer in Canada. Employer-specific work permit holders may continue to work for the employer named on their work permit.
  • Work and study permit holders will also be permitted to apply for an extension of their work or study permit even after the initial work or study permit has expired if the application is made, in the case of workers, by August 3, 2016, or in the case of students, by November 3, 2016.
  • Work and study permit extension fees will be applied to applications received after August 3, 2016.
  • The requirement to be actively studying and making progress toward a degree, diploma or certificate has also been waived until November 3, 2016, for study permit holders whose designated learning institution has been affected by the wildfires.

Access further important instructions and information.

Free Radio Workshops for Newcomers

Tue, 2016-05-31 09:51

How did your family come to Canada? Is a common question in Toronto, but for most newly arrived immigrants and refugees the main questions around language, housing, employment, immigration and homesickness are foremost. Now their stories and questions will be broadcast on CJRU1280AM.

New Canadian Life is a fresh, culture-oriented radio initiative offered through a partnership between CultureLink and CJRU 1280AM. This program is focused on providing newcomers with an introduction to community radio through a series of radio workshops, where they will be able to learn new radio skills, and share their unique stories and perspectives in Canada. Culturelink’s own Abdi and Glen going live-to-air on CJRU 1280 AM with their own show recorded at CultureLink, one of Toronto’s largest settlement agencies.

The workshops, hosted at CultureLink, will begin in June and are expected to bring newcomers of all backgrounds to participate hands-on in audio production, music use, foley, sound effects, and voice and presentation skills. Most importantly, participants will have an opportunity to interview and engage with diverse populations in Toronto such as local politicians, musicians, activists and business leaders.

The radio workshops are set for six weeks, two sessions each week on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4 P.M.-6 P.M. Upon completion of the workshops, newcomers will have the opportunity to host and produce their own spoken word or music program that highlights multicultural backgrounds and voices.

The goal of this project is to increase the rates of civic participation and volunteer engagement among newcomers. This provides the opportunity for newcomer immigrants to sit behind the studio microphones. Broadcasting in their own voice issues critical to their successful integration in mainstream Canada

New Canadian Life is a partnership between CJRU1280AM – The Scope at Ryerson and CultureLink and is grant-funded by the Community Radio Fund of Canada.

For more information contact Abdi at ayousuf@culturelink.ca, Glen at gwalsh@culturelink.ca or Jacky at jacky@cjru.ca. Information is also available at their website, on Facebook and Twitter.

Free Radio Workshops for Newcomers

Tue, 2016-05-31 09:51

How did your family come to Canada? Is a common question in Toronto, but for most newly arrived immigrants and refugees the main questions around language, housing, employment, immigration and homesickness are foremost. Now their stories and questions will be broadcast on CJRU1280AM.

New Canadian Life is a fresh, culture-oriented radio initiative offered through a partnership between CultureLink and CJRU 1280AM. This program is focused on providing newcomers with an introduction to community radio through a series of radio workshops, where they will be able to learn new radio skills, and share their unique stories and perspectives in Canada. Culturelink’s own Abdi and Glen going live-to-air on CJRU 1280 AM with their own show recorded at CultureLink, one of Toronto’s largest settlement agencies.

The workshops, hosted at CultureLink, will begin in June and are expected to bring newcomers of all backgrounds to participate hands-on in audio production, music use, foley, sound effects, and voice and presentation skills. Most importantly, participants will have an opportunity to interview and engage with diverse populations in Toronto such as local politicians, musicians, activists and business leaders.

The radio workshops are set for six weeks, two sessions each week on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4 P.M.-6 P.M. Upon completion of the workshops, newcomers will have the opportunity to host and produce their own spoken word or music program that highlights multicultural backgrounds and voices.

The goal of this project is to increase the rates of civic participation and volunteer engagement among newcomers. This provides the opportunity for newcomer immigrants to sit behind the studio microphones. Broadcasting in their own voice issues critical to their successful integration in mainstream Canada

New Canadian Life is a partnership between CJRU1280AM – The Scope at Ryerson and CultureLink and is grant-funded by the Community Radio Fund of Canada.

For more information contact Abdi at ayousuf@culturelink.ca, Glen at gwalsh@culturelink.ca or Jacky at jacky@cjru.ca. Information is also available at their website, on Facebook and Twitter.

Ten Youth have Received the Ontario Medal for Young Volunteers

Tue, 2016-05-31 09:33

This year’s honourees contributed to Ontario and inspired others to get involved by:

  • Encouraging 31 schools to hold a cheek swabbing drive, adding more than 2,800 registrants to a national stem cell and bone marrow registry
  • Providing support for children residing in domestic violence shelters
  • Addressing challenges faced by young adoptees and their families
  • Creating a free drop-in weekly social program for teenagers and youth with autism.

The Honourable Elizabeth Dowdeswell, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, presented the medals at a ceremony held at Queen’s Park, joined by Michael Chan, Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade.

Quick Facts

Background Information