Frequently Asked Questions

Click on a question to see the answer.

The Organizational Standards

Standards that are mainly concerned with governance and management, as well as broad approaches to service delivery and community building.

outline the expectations for the effective governanceRefers to the source of strategic thinking and decisions that shape and direct an organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Includes anything related to non‐profit boards as well as strategic leadership issues. of boards and effective management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

of community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

based organization. Organizational Standards help promote organizational excellence, establish the foundation for effective and efficient program and service delivery and contribute to Immigrant and Refugee sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

with a greater focus on performance, accountability and sustainability.

There are four principal areas (4) covered by the standard:

  1. A Community

    The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

    Based Approach, (Link webcast)
  2. GovernanceRefers to the source of strategic thinking and decisions that shape and direct an organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Includes anything related to non‐profit boards as well as strategic leadership issues. and Strategic Leadership

    When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

    , (Link webcast)
  3. Operations (Link webcast)
  4. Human Resources (Link webcast)

We recommend that you view the short videos webcast at the start of each section of the assessment page or reading about how to use OrgWise.

 

The indicators

Evidence or measures that show that a certain condition exists or certain results have or have not been achieved. They tell you how much progress has been made toward the intended goals, objectives, outputs or outcomes. Here, indicators are the practical and measurable markers that monitor specific aspects of a standard. Meeting certain indicators means the achievement of some level of the standard.

are specific questions that are used as measurement index to evaluate if an organization meets a particular standard. There are 190 indicators. The indicators provide critical information on performance, achievement and accountability, which is the cornerstone of an organization meeting the standards

Desired and achievable levels of performance against which actual performance can be compared. Standards help to bolster public confidence, promote transparency and accountability, enhance performance and effectiveness, and help organizations achieve their mission, improve their practices, and educate board and staff about good practices.

.

  • If you do not have an account you will need to sign up for an account<
  • You can use either your name, organizations name or an email to create your account
  • After the account is approved you can log into to OrgWise website Click on one of the 4 Areas of the self-assessment - A Community

    The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

    Based Approach, GovernanceRefers to the source of strategic thinking and decisions that shape and direct an organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Includes anything related to non‐profit boards as well as strategic leadership issues. and Strategic Leadership

    When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

    , Operations and Human Resources.

Please remember to use a password and a user name that is easy for you to remember: Also we encourage that you use your work email to rather than a personal email. Note if you use your personal email your assessment will not count. (Insert the new approach to username, etc.)

There are many approaches that you can choose to complete the self-assessment. It all depends on you. Answering the indicators

Evidence or measures that show that a certain condition exists or certain results have or have not been achieved. They tell you how much progress has been made toward the intended goals, objectives, outputs or outcomes. Here, indicators are the practical and measurable markers that monitor specific aspects of a standard. Meeting certain indicators means the achievement of some level of the standard.

require due consideration and represents an important opportunity for individuals to engage in objective analysis and reflection. As such, we encourage agencies to dedicate enough time to work on the assessment. In this fashion, organizations will have an accurate understanding of their capacity building strengths and opportunities for growth.

Here are some strategies organizations have used to complete their assessment:

  • Executive Director works individually on the self-assessment and share the results with staff

    For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

    and the boardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization.<
  • Assemble a core team of senior management

    Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

    staff to complete the organization assessment
  • Work collectively with board members to answer the Indicators and analyze the results
  • Incorporate the knowledge and input of all staff and board members to complete the self-assessment
  • Complete the assessment as a capacity/ team building activity by dedicating a specific time
  1. A Community

    The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

    Based Approach, (11 standards

    Desired and achievable levels of performance against which actual performance can be compared. Standards help to bolster public confidence, promote transparency and accountability, enhance performance and effectiveness, and help organizations achieve their mission, improve their practices, and educate board and staff about good practices.

    )
  2. GovernanceRefers to the source of strategic thinking and decisions that shape and direct an organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Includes anything related to non‐profit boards as well as strategic leadership issues. and Strategic Leadership

    When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

    , (15 standards)
  3. Operations and (9 standards)
  4. 4. Human Resources. (8 standards)
This all depends on you, and what strategy you use: Identifying, measuring, and addressing capacity building priorities are part of an ongoing organization development process. The OrgWise self-assessment is a resource intended to complement this process. Since organizational development

A process through which an organization increases its capacity to successfully pursue its mission. This can include collaboration to create organizational change, to enhance organizational health, and to improve staff satisfaction and effectiveness.

and capacity building is unique to each agency, there are many different approaches individuals and agencies can incorporate to effectively complete the OrgWise self-assessment and analyze the results.

 

You can start at the beginning or with any one of the standards

Desired and achievable levels of performance against which actual performance can be compared. Standards help to bolster public confidence, promote transparency and accountability, enhance performance and effectiveness, and help organizations achieve their mission, improve their practices, and educate board and staff about good practices.

:

  1. You can start by clicking on the “A Community

    The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

    Based Approach” tab at the top. Alternatively you can click on one of the other 3 category tabs - "GovernanceRefers to the source of strategic thinking and decisions that shape and direct an organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Includes anything related to non‐profit boards as well as strategic leadership issues. & Strategic Leadership

    When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

    ", "Operations", and "Human Resources".

  2. You will be taken to a listing of all the standards< in the category you choose. The standards are organized into sections within the category. For example, In "A Community Based Approach", the first section is “Strengthening Communities”.

  3. Click on any of the standards. You will be taken to the standard page, where a number of indicator statements are listed below the standard statement. These statements are concrete and are specific measures of that standard.

  4. Use the rating scale listed below the indicator statement to determine how your organization is doing - choose No, In Progress, Yes, Innovative, or Not Applicable.

  5. You can click on the “?” to the right of the rating scale to get a description of what each of the elements in the rating scale mean. Or, you can click on the "Indicator Rating Scale Legend" in the Help section.

  6. You can also click on “Helpful Hints” – below the indicator statement and rating scale – to get more details on the indicator.

  7. Also, at the bottom of each page, you have the option to add private notes or files for yourself. If there are particular indicators

    Evidence or measures that show that a certain condition exists or certain results have or have not been achieved. They tell you how much progress has been made toward the intended goals, objectives, outputs or outcomes. Here, indicators are the practical and measurable markers that monitor specific aspects of a standard. Meeting certain indicators means the achievement of some level of the standard.

    that you are unsure of you may make a note to talk to a boardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization. or staff

    For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

    person before you respond to a particular indicator statement, or attach a file that shows evidence that you have a system, policy, practice or approach in place.

  8. When you are done with the current page, click on the “Next” button to go to the next standard within that category.

  9. Once you have completed a category you will be able to see results for that category, and when you go back to the standard you will see resources, tools, and sample policies for that standard.

PLEASE NOTE: All your answers are saved automatically so you don’t have to worry about losing your work.

 

We encourage organizations to answer the all the indicators

Evidence or measures that show that a certain condition exists or certain results have or have not been achieved. They tell you how much progress has been made toward the intended goals, objectives, outputs or outcomes. Here, indicators are the practical and measurable markers that monitor specific aspects of a standard. Meeting certain indicators means the achievement of some level of the standard.

so that the assessment would accurately reflect priority needs, strength and provide a well informed and comprehensive report.

 

The answers are automatically saved each time you enter an answer or when you leave a page. You can stop at any time, come back to where you left off, or pick up somewhere else in the assessment.

 

The first step of meeting the OrgWise Standards

Desired and achievable levels of performance against which actual performance can be compared. Standards help to bolster public confidence, promote transparency and accountability, enhance performance and effectiveness, and help organizations achieve their mission, improve their practices, and educate board and staff about good practices.

is for agencies to complete 100% of the organizational self-assessment in order to identify strengths and uncover gaps in agency’s performance. Secondly you will receive an automatic comprehensive report that reflects where the organization shows great leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

, need improvement or below standard. This comprehensive report is the baseline of where your organization is located on the spectrum of the standards

 

Yes. Any organizational change process requires the engagement of the people it will involve and affect. Hence let your colleagues, managers, staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

and boardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization. members know about the self-assessment. Let them know what you are doing and why. Let them know what to expect, and how they can be involved.

There likely are people in your organization who have more insight into some sections of the self-assessment than you do. Use that – involving key people in responding to the indicators

Evidence or measures that show that a certain condition exists or certain results have or have not been achieved. They tell you how much progress has been made toward the intended goals, objectives, outputs or outcomes. Here, indicators are the practical and measurable markers that monitor specific aspects of a standard. Meeting certain indicators means the achievement of some level of the standard.

will improve the quality of your answers, and thus the quality of the picture OrgWise gives you- of how your organization is doing. Here are some more examples of how to use OrgWise Assessment as team building:

Education and team building: Other users have found that they learned a lot from sharing opinions, and from hearing other peoples’ perspectives. You may find new insight into your organization. You may also find opportunities for educating people – board members, for example – about your organization, its strengths, and the issues you face.

Improving communication: Involving people in the self-assessment process can also be good for communication within your organization. Using the process as a time to talk and weigh in about organizational issues can be a starting point for open dialogue about your organizational capacityA multi‐faceted concept referring broadly to an organization’s power, strength, and ability to grow, develop, and accomplish its goals. Elements of capacity can include knowledge, people and resources. strengths and challenges.

Building investment in change: This is about buy-in again – people are often quicker to mobilize to participate in change when they’ve identified the needs themselves. Everyone likes to feel that their input is valued and spurs action.

 

This online voluntary organizational self-assessment tool available in both French and English:

  • Enables organizations to assess their strengths and weaknesses against a set of Voluntary Standards

    Desired and achievable levels of performance against which actual performance can be compared. Standards help to bolster public confidence, promote transparency and accountability, enhance performance and effectiveness, and help organizations achieve their mission, improve their practices, and educate board and staff about good practices.

    <

  • Links agencies with a variety of resources to support capacity-building initiatives

  • Part of a coordinated, and holistic approach to organizational infrastructure and capacity development

    ‘Capacity’ is a general term we use to refer to the various abilities, skills, knowledge, attitudes, values, structures, relationships, behaviours, resources and conditions needed to carry out functions and achieve objectives. Here ‘capacity development’ refers to a deliberate, coordinated process to grow, strengthen, create, adapt, or maintain the capacity of an organization or community over time. See also Organizational Capacity, Organizational Development.

  • It is a great planning, coordination and risk management

    Risk management involves examining a situation and 1) identifying what can go wrong, 2) identifying measures to avoid such problems, and 3) if something does go wrong, identifying steps that can be taken to lessen the negative impact. These measures may include the use of policies, procedures, and protections (such as insurance or education). Risks can be related, for example, to financial loss, workplace safety issues including abuse & physical harm or injury, property damage, or loss of reputation.

    tool

  • OrgWise is a knowledge and resource hub for the immigrant and refugee-serving sector

    Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

    agencies to identify and address capacity building priorities

  • Encompasses numerous tools and resources to support organizational development

    A process through which an organization increases its capacity to successfully pursue its mission. This can include collaboration to create organizational change, to enhance organizational health, and to improve staff satisfaction and effectiveness.

    <

  • Provides users with the opportunity to connect with peers and leading organizational development experts to builds organizational capacityA multi‐faceted concept referring broadly to an organization’s power, strength, and ability to grow, develop, and accomplish its goals. Elements of capacity can include knowledge, people and resources.<

  • Aggregate data helps to inform what sector capacity initiatives funders support

  • Aggregate data also helps to inform what sector training OCASI as a council offers to the sector 

 

If you are experiencing a problem on this site; please use the Feedback link, (at the top of the right sidebar) to send us a message. We are interested in hearing from you about all aspects of the site.

 

Your password and your login are unique to you created your OrgWise account. This is the name and password that you used. Your "login name" may your email, but you can change it to whatever you want (within reason...).

 

If you've already logged in, you can view and change your user name and password on your "Account" page, this is accessible from the "My Homepage" link is located at the top right side of your screen. Click on “edit” and you will be able to change your user name and or password.

If you forget your password, you can go to the login page and click on "Forgot my password" to have it emailed to you, as long as you have access to the email address that you had when signed up. All you need to know is your email address.

 

In this case we recommend that you contact orgwise@ocasi.org< with all the possible names emails etc. that you might have use in order for us to do a systems search.

If you do not even know if you have an account, the same step applies.

 

 

To print the results from the assessment, click the ‘Results’ tab

  • At the top right of the screen, next to the navigation bar click the small printer icon for a printer friendly version of the results. 

  • Once the printer friendly version loads you can print that screen

To print the chart of the results from the assessment, click the ‘Results Chart, Combine or Table ‘tab. This page will illustrate your overall results in the form of a chart

  • To print it, at the top right of the screen, next to the navigation bar click the small printer icon for a printer friendly version of the results. 

  • Once the printer friendly version loads, you can print that screen

To print the charts for the individual areas of the standards

Desired and achievable levels of performance against which actual performance can be compared. Standards help to bolster public confidence, promote transparency and accountability, enhance performance and effectiveness, and help organizations achieve their mission, improve their practices, and educate board and staff about good practices.

, click the individual links for: ‘A Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

Based Approach
’, ‘GovernanceRefers to the source of strategic thinking and decisions that shape and direct an organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Includes anything related to non‐profit boards as well as strategic leadership issues. & Strategic Leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

<
‘, ‘Operations’, and ‘Human Resources

  • Once you have clicked the link for the respective area of the standards a new chart will appear showing the results pertaining to that specific area of the standards. 

Organizations that have completed 100% of their self-assessment will receive a summary report of their responses, with links to resources that will help them to further strengthen organizational systems.

These resources encompass many unique tools that agencies can use to support their capacity building priorities as outlined by their self-assessment.

These resources includes, but are not limited to: electronic resources, policies, templates, how to guides, manuals, live and archived webinars, multimedia best practice videos, webcasts, organization to organization mentoring and an online discussion forum.

 

 

We encourage organizations to complete a second Assessment one year after they have completed their first Assessment. To Compare Assessment click on ` Compare Assessment` located on the top right hand of your computer screen. Click on any of the categories (A Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

Based Approach’, ‘GovernanceRefers to the source of strategic thinking and decisions that shape and direct an organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Includes anything related to non‐profit boards as well as strategic leadership issues. & Strategic Leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

‘, ‘Operations’, and ‘Human Resources’), then select by checking the two boxes of the assessment you want to compare and press ``Compare``.

 

Before you can start your second OrgWise Assessment you must complete 100% of your first assessment. On your assessment start page click Compare Assessment located at the right side the screen. Click on any of the categories (A Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

Based Approach’, ‘GovernanceRefers to the source of strategic thinking and decisions that shape and direct an organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Includes anything related to non‐profit boards as well as strategic leadership issues. & Strategic Leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

‘, ‘Operations’, and ‘Human Resources’), then select “Start a new Assessment``

 

There are many resources on the OrgWise website that your organization can draw on to help meet the standards

Desired and achievable levels of performance against which actual performance can be compared. Standards help to bolster public confidence, promote transparency and accountability, enhance performance and effectiveness, and help organizations achieve their mission, improve their practices, and educate board and staff about good practices.

.

Here are some strategies that may help you after you complete your assessment:

  1. Review your organizational Self-assessment

  2. Identify which areas of your assessment report are key priorities for your Organization and require immediate attention

  3. Create an Action Plan for the key priorities

  4. On your organization’s action plan chronologically rank the key priorities your organization would like to address first

  5. Draw from any of the compliment of resources that are available on the OrgWise website. These resources includes: electronic resources- policies, template, guides, sector

    Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

    specific webinars, videos and organization to organization mentoring.

 

  • Go to "My Homepage" - the link to this page is on the top of every screen.

  • Go to the "Results" link listed below "My Homepage" 

  • Scroll through the list of all the standards< and indicator and look under the "Incomplete" column.

  • Click on the standard text in instances where something is shown to be incomplete. You will be taken back into the assessment. Find the indicator statement box that has not yet been completed. All completed answers will be in bright yellow.

  • Return back to "My Homepage" - "Results" to find any other incomplete sections.

 


There is no one right way of working on this self-assessment. Many factors will affect how you choose to go about it. Here are some suggestions based on what has worked for others.


Tell people about it.

Let your colleagues, managers, staff and board members know about the self-assessment before you begin. Let them know what you are doing and why. Let them know what to expect, and how they can be involved.

      Why?

Any organizational change process requires the engagement of the people it will involve and affect. Engage them early on, and you may minimize surprise and nervousness, address concerns, and build early buy-in -- helpful for when you ask people to act on the results later on.

Involve others in the process

Ask your managers, staff, and board members to help complete the self-assessment. Choose a few key people to work with you perhaps, or cast your net wider – we know of one small organization that involved the whole team to complete the assessment by consensus.

There are many ways you can do this – sit together as a group and work through the categories, or divide the work based on areas of expertise, for example. Share the effort in a way that makes sense for you.

       Why?

Quality responses mean more useful reports. There are likely people in your organization who have more insight into some sections of the self-assessment than you do. Use that – involving key people in responding to the indicators will improve the quality of your answers, and thus the quality of the picture OrgWise gives you of how your organization is doing.

Education and team building. Other users have found that they learned a lot from sharing opinions, and from hearing other peoples’ perspectives. You may find new insight into your organization. You may also find opportunities for educating people – board members, for example – about your organization, its strengths, and the issues you face.

Improving communication. Involving people in the self-assessment process can also be good for communication within your organization. Using the process as a time to talk and weigh in about organizational issues together can be a starting point for open dialogue about your organizational capacity strengths and challenges.

Building investment in change. This is about buy-in again – people are often quicker to mobilize to participate in change when they’ve identified the needs themselves. Everyone likes to feel that their input is valued and spurs action.

  • Go to "My Homepage" - the link to this page is on the top of every screen.
  • Go to the "Indicators

    Evidence or measures that show that a certain condition exists or certain results have or have not been achieved. They tell you how much progress has been made toward the intended goals, objectives, outputs or outcomes. Here, indicators are the practical and measurable markers that monitor specific aspects of a standard. Meeting certain indicators means the achievement of some level of the standard.

    " link listed below "My Homepage" 
  • Choose either to print "all" the standards

    Desired and achievable levels of performance against which actual performance can be compared. Standards help to bolster public confidence, promote transparency and accountability, enhance performance and effectiveness, and help organizations achieve their mission, improve their practices, and educate board and staff about good practices.

    and indicators, only those that are still "unanswered", or those that have been "answered", .
  • Click on the printer icon.

 

  • Go to "My Homepage" - the link to this page is on the top of every screen.
  • Go to the "Results" link listed below "My Homepage" 
  • Scroll through a the list of all the standards

    Desired and achievable levels of performance against which actual performance can be compared. Standards help to bolster public confidence, promote transparency and accountability, enhance performance and effectiveness, and help organizations achieve their mission, improve their practices, and educate board and staff about good practices.

    and indicator and look under the "Incomplete" column.
  • Click on the standard text in instances where something is shown to be incomplete. You will be taken back into the assessment. Find the indicator statement box that has not yet been completed. All completed answers will be in bright yellow.
  • Return back to "My Homepage" - "Results" to find any other incomplete sections.

    To make the font bigger on your internet browser, do the following:

    On your keyboard, hold down the 'control' tab and press the "+" key at the same time. Each time you do this the font will get larger.

    1. You can start by clicking on the “A Community Based Approach” tab at the top.Alternatively you can click on one of the other 3 category tabs - "Governance & Strategic Leadership", "Operations", and "Human Resources".

    2. You will be taken to a listing of all the standards

      Desired and achievable levels of performance against which actual performance can be compared. Standards help to bolster public confidence, promote transparency and accountability, enhance performance and effectiveness, and help organizations achieve their mission, improve their practices, and educate board and staff about good practices.

      in the category you choose. The standards are organized into sections within the category. For example, In "A Community Based Approach", the first section is “Strengthening Communities”.

    3. Click on any of the standards. You will be taken to the standard page, where a number of indicator statements are listed below the standard statement. These statements are concrete and specific measures of that standard.

    4. Use the rating scale listed below the indicator statement to determine how your organization is doing - choose No, In Progress, Yes, Innovative, or Not Applicable.
    5. You can click on the “?” to the right of the rating scale to get a description of what each of the elements in the rating scale mean. Or, you can click on the "Indicator Rating Scale Legend" in the Help section.

    6. You can also click on “Helpful Hints” – below the indicator statement and rating scale – to get more details on the indicator.

    7. Also, at the bottom of each page, you have the option to add private notes or files for yourself. You may want to make a note to talk to a board or staff person before you respond to a particular indicator statement, or attach a file that shows evidence that you have a system, policy, practice or approach in place.

    8. When you are done with the current page, click on the green “Next” button to go to the next standard within that category.

    9. Once you have completed a category you will be able to see results for that category, and when you go back to the standard you will see resources, tools, and sample policies for that standard.

    10. PLEASE NOTE: everything gets saved automatically so you don’t have to worry about losing your work.

    If you experience a problem on this site, please use the Feedback link (at the top of the right sidebar). We're interested in hearing from you about all aspects of the site.

    If you've already logged in, you can view and change these on your "Account" page, accessible from the "My Homepage" link at the top of your screen.

    Whenever you login, you can use either your email address or your "login name". Your "login name" may initially be set to your email, but you can change it to whatever you want (within reason...).

    If you forget your password, you can go to the login page and click on "Forgot my password" to have it mailed to you, as long as you have access to the email address that you had when signed up. All you need to know is your email address.

    If you don't even know if you have an account, hopefully you're not reading this yet, but try asking someone else.

    For most pages on this site, there is no "submit" button because all your work is saved as you go. Most of the time, you should see some form of feedback (e.g. turning yellow) to indicate that the site has recognized and saved your input.

    The only exception to this is your "Account" page, where you can modify your username, email, password and/or language of choice. On this page, you do need to click the submit button at the bottom of the form for your changes to take effect.

     

    The answers are automatically saved each time you enter an answer or when you leave a page. You can stop at any time, come back to where you left off, or pick up somewhere else in the assessment.

     

    The first step of meeting the OrgWise Standards

    Desired and achievable levels of performance against which actual performance can be compared. Standards help to bolster public confidence, promote transparency and accountability, enhance performance and effectiveness, and help organizations achieve their mission, improve their practices, and educate board and staff about good practices.

    is for agencies to complete 100% of the organizational self-assessment in order to identify strengths and uncover gaps in agency’s performance. Secondly you will receive an automatic comprehensive report that reflects where the organization shows great leadership

    When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

    , need improvement or below standard. This comprehensive report is the baseline of where your organization is located on the spectrum of the standards