Anti-oppression


Anti-oppression

Used as an umbrella term that includes activities, practices, policies, ways of thinking, and initiatives that address oppression

The systemic mistreatment of one group of people by another group of people between whom there is an imbalance of institutional power. Mistreatment can include psychological, physical and verbal forms of abuse and subjugation; it can be subtle and need not be intentional. Examples include racism, sexism, ableism, heterosexism, classism, and so on.

in all its forms (e.g. racism, homophobia, classism, ablism). Key to anti-oppression

Used as an umbrella term that includes activities, practices, policies, ways of thinking, and initiatives that address oppression in all its forms (e.g. racism, homophobia, classism, ablism). Key to anti-oppression is an understanding that inequality and oppression exist in the world, and that all of us participate in unequal power dynamics in a variety of ways. Anti-oppression involves reflection and making choices about how to give, share, wield, or withhold power to assist and act in solidarity with people who are marginalized. Anti-oppression is sometimes used with the terms equity and accessibility: Anti-oppression is a broader term that includes a commitment to equity and accessibility. See both equity and accessibility.

is an understanding that inequality and oppression exist in the world, and that all of us participate in unequal power dynamics in a variety of ways. Anti-oppression involves reflection and making choices about how to give, share, wield, or withhold power to assist and act in solidarity with people who are marginalized. Anti-oppression is sometimes used with the terms equityEquity is about fairness, justice, access to equal opportunity, recognizing inequalities and taking steps to address them. It requires eliminating barriers to economic, social and political opportunities and access to services. See also anti-oppression. and accessibility

The degree to which organizations and their services can be accessed by as many diverse people as possible. Whether something is accessible can depend, for example, on service design, organizational climate and culture, physical structures. Accessibility is related to the concept of ‘barriers,’ which are practices, structures, attitudes, and other things that block access. See also the definition of anti-oppression.

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: Anti-oppression is a broader term that includes a commitment to equity and accessibility. See both equity and accessibility.