Disability


Disability
While disabilityWhile disability is commonly understood as a restriction or lack of ability to perform an activity beyond the range of what is considered “normal”, disability rights activists challenge this definition. Instead, disability is a normal aspect of life. In fact, most people will experience some form of disability, either permanent or temporary, over the course of their lives. Rather than viewing the condition of the person as the source of the problem, an anti-oppression approach acknowledges that it is social discrimination and physical and institutional barriers that are the greatest challenge for those with disabilities. is commonly understood as a restriction or lack of ability to perform an activity beyond the range of what is considered “normal”, disability rights activists challenge this definition. Instead, disability is a normal aspect of life. In fact, most people will experience some form of disability, either permanent or temporary, over the course of their lives. Rather than viewing the condition of the person as the source of the problem, an anti-oppression

Used as an umbrella term that includes activities, practices, policies, ways of thinking, and initiatives that address oppression in all its forms (e.g. racism, homophobia, classism, ablism). Key to anti-oppression is an understanding that inequality and oppression exist in the world, and that all of us participate in unequal power dynamics in a variety of ways. Anti-oppression involves reflection and making choices about how to give, share, wield, or withhold power to assist and act in solidarity with people who are marginalized. Anti-oppression is sometimes used with the terms equity and accessibility: Anti-oppression is a broader term that includes a commitment to equity and accessibility. See both equity and accessibility.

approach acknowledges that it is social discrimination and physical and institutional barriers that are the greatest challenge for those with disabilities.