Resources, Tools and Sample Policies

OrgWise electronic resources offer users a complement of resources to assist organizations in to their organizations capacity

This is a list of all resources. You can filter the list by typing in a keyword and/or category and clicking "Apply".
Strategic Leadership

Building Policy Partnerships: Making Network Governance Work

This resource, developed by the Institute on GovernanceRefers to the source of strategic thinking and decisions that shape and direct an organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Includes anything related to non‐profit boards as well as strategic leadership issues., summarizes the findings of seven umbrella organizations in order to identify and establish effective network governance structures, practices and ways to find mutually beneficial links between  non-profits and various stakeholders on policy issues. The document explores the policy formulation process and how it must take into account a variety of perspectives stemming from third parties and minority groups in order to be effective (p 13). It also examines various avenues for influencing public policy that non-profits have at their disposal (p 16-17) as well as public education campaigns ( p 15-16).

Institute on Governance. (February 2002). Building Policy Partnerships: Making Network Governance Work. 1-27. Ottawa, Canada.

 

 

Merging Non-profit Organizations the Art and Science of the...

The number of mergers involving non-profit organizations is increasing. So, too, is the need for concise, practical information to guide non-profit leaders through the merger process. This resource provides you information about non-profit mergers.  Different Perspectives of Merger (pg. 1) topics includes-Merger Process Overview and Context, Mergers and Other Types of Strategic, Alliances- Strategic Planning

An activity carried out on a regular basis to clarify an organization’s purpose, goals, priorities, and a plan for reaching those goals and addressing the priorities.

(pg. 11)
Environmental Assessment, Organizational Assessment, Forces Driving Strategic Alliance, Formation Partner Selection (pg. 19) Criteria for Selecting a Merger Partner, Creation of a Joint Feasibility Task Force, Building Trust with a Potential,  Partner, Due Diligence Defined (pg. 49), Defined Professional Assistance in Conducting, Due Diligence, Good Faith Assumptions, Managing the Unexpected and The Value of Due Diligence.  
 
Published in 2001 in the United States of America by the Mandel Center for Non-profit Organizations

NOAA Fisheries Northeast Region Outreach Strategic Plan

This resource, developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries, is a copy of the NOAA’s strategic outreach plan logically divided and organized into several sections. This resource serves as an excellent template that may be used by non-profit organizations as it breaks down and highlights the core and fundamental components of a strategic outreach and communications plan. There are sections that detail the various primary and secondary goals as well as the justification for these goals (pp.6-10). The resource also incorporates a logic model

A visual representation or work plan of how your program works. It lists what you put into your program (resources), what you do (activities), and what you plan to achieve (outputs and outcomes).

into the plan and even a blueprint for agencies when listing outreach activities and their associated outputs (pp. 12, 20).

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (2005). NOAA Fisheries Northeast Region Outreach Strategic Plan

A document at the organizational level, delineating an organization’s mission, goals, and strategies for attaining these goals. A strategic plan typically covers a 3-5 year timeframe.

. 1-20. Gloucester, Massachusetts, United States.

 

 

The Demonstrating Value Workbook: An Activity Guide to...

 

This resource, developed by Vancity Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

Foundation, is an activity book to be used by non-profit to organize data and information and communicate the value of the services and programs to stakeholders. This workbook follows a multi-step process guide and features a variety of activity sections that can be utilized and filled in. Of particular importance is the section defining stakeholders and ranking determining which stakeholders are of highest priority (p 5) and also a section on information mapping (p 9-11). Apart from listing several other resources with each activity section, the activity book lists several common methods of collecting and monitoring information that can be used by your agency (p 26).

 

Vancity Community Foundation. (February, 2011). The Demonstrating Value Workbook: An Activity Guide to Tracking and Expressing Your Organization’s Success. 1-34. Vancouver, Canada.

 

Communications & Collaboration

Communities and Local Government: Working Together

This resource manual, developed by the Ontario Healthy Communities Coalition, relates to how organizations can forge new and strengthen existing relationships with local and municipal governments. The document begins by exploring the Healthy Communities Model, which recognizes that “a healthy community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

provides our [physical, mental, spiritual, and emotional] needs for all its members, and maintains healthy relationships both within and outside of the community” (p 2). The manual outlines various opportunities in which agencies can engage with local governments at various levels and stages of decision-making (pp. 12-15, 23-27).

Ontario Healthy Communities Coalition. (May, 2003). Communities and Local Government: Working Together. 1-43. Toronto, Canada.

 

Producing Your Own Media

This resource, developed by Civicus, is a toolkit to assist organizations to communicate their vision, mission, and message to stakeholders and the greater public through print media. The toolkit begins by providing readers with an overview of media and how to produce effective media, which begins with the development of a media strategy (pp. 7-11). Included in the toolkit are sample production schedules and plans for producing a newsletter (pp. 11-12) that serve as great guiding frameworks. Information related to newsletter/magazine design and layout (pp. 17-23) also provides insight and numerous strategies that organizations can adopt when developing effective and striking print media. Lastly, a sample mind map is provided that serves as a great template and activity that users can use when developing content for presentations (p 62)

Hurt, Karen; Civicus. (2011). Producing Your Own Media. 1-75. Washington D.C, United States.

 

 

A Manager’s Guide to Choosing and Using Collaborative...

This report on public network management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

attempts to integrate and critically evaluate what is known about the various kinds of networks and network management. The framework presented in this document allows public managers in the non-profit and private sectors whose work is funded by government, to understand more clearly what kind of network they are attempting to manage or manage in. It will also provide a number of tools and methods that network managers can use to achieve network goals.

Milward, B. and Proven, K (2006) A Manager’s Guide to Choosing and Using Collaborative Networks

A step-by-step guide: creating an outreach plan

This step-by-step guide is intended to be used as a tool to help you create your own outreach plan. Outreach can be described as using a specific message to communicate between your group and the public for mutual benefit. Creating and implementing a basic outreach plan for your parents’ group will help you create awareness, recruit members, and gain resources.

Building NGO/CBO Capacity for Organizational Outreach

 

This resource, developed by UN-HABITAT, is a guide that explores how non-government organizations and agencies can communicate more effectively with stakeholders, engaging in advocacy work and influence policy and decision-making, and developing strategic alliances. The resource is divided into Part One, which explores each of three central  themes, and Part Two, which provides tools for self-directed learning. Unique features of this resource include strategies for engaging in outreach through public relations campaigns (pp. 10-12) and even how networking can be incorporated into one’s communication strategy (pp. 14-16). Lastly, several important points are explored in relation to creating successful alliances and engaging in strategic collaboration (pp. 20-22).

Fisher, F. (2004). Building NGO/CBO Capacity for Organizational Outreach. 1-32. Nairobi, Kenya. 

 

Building Sustainable Non-Profits: The Waterloo Region...

This resource, developed jointly by the Centre for Research and Education in Human Services and the Social Planning Council of Cambridge and North Dumfries, is a manual intended to provide agencies with a variety strategies to cope with sustainability challenges while using the Waterloo Region as a case study. This manual begins by examining organizational sustainability in four dimension: relationships and partnerships, organizational culture, planning and leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

, and organizational relevance. An excellent exercise in reviewing existing partnerships and networks enables agencies to objectively assess the benefits of the relationship and how it is linked to an agency’s mission and objectives (p 20-21). Another worksheet allows Directors to reflect on organizational values

Values are ideals, standards, or qualities considered worthwhile or desirable. See also “principles,” which are often shaped by values.

by separating the written and unwritten beliefs that serve influence organizational culture (p 55-58).

Centre for Research and Education in Human Services; Social Planning Council of Cambridge and North Dumfries. (2004). Building Sustainable Non-Profits: The Waterloo Region Experience. 1-95. Kitchener, Canada.

 

 

Collaboration Processes: Inside the Black Box

This article contains a wealth of knowledge for people seeking to understand collaboration processes. The authors argue that public managers should look inside the “black box” of collaboration processes. Inside, they will find a complex construct of five variable dimensions: governanceRefers to the source of strategic thinking and decisions that shape and direct an organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Includes anything related to non‐profit boards as well as strategic leadership issues., administration, organizational autonomy, mutuality, and norms. Public managers must know these five dimensions and manage them intentionally in order to collaborate effectively.

 

Thomson, A & P, James. Collaboration Processes: Inside the Black Box. Public Administration Review • December 2006: Special Issue

Education Training and Employment

Education, Training & Employment

This document speaks about developing education and employment programs. Most programs for youth experiencing homelessness in Canada focus on skills development (getting them into the job market) rather than providing them with an opportunity to finish school.

Inadequate income, employment and education are well-documented as contributing factors of people cycling in and out of homelessness. Solving these inadequacies would create possibilities of moving out of homelessness. 

Promoting Your Organisation

This resource, Developed by Civicus, is  a toolkit that provides Executive Directors  with action items and strategies for effectively promoting their respective organization. This work, though often left out, is important as it “deepens your organisation’s[sic] roots in the community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

[and] sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

... and it gives your organisation[sic] a public profile” (p 1). The resource begins by exploring the importance of context in relation to promotional work (p 6) and aligning a promotional strategy with the overall vision, mission and objectives of the organization (pp. 11-13). Several tips are also offered on conducting an effective environmental scan, in order to ensure a promotional strategy can be successful (pp. 21-24) and outlining the various step-by-step elements of a promotion strategy, made available in an easy to follow flow chart (p 27).

Hurt, K. (2012). Promoting Your Organisation. 1-65. Washington, D.C, United States.

Strengthening the Capacity of Nonprofit and Voluntary...

 

 

This resource, developed by Imagine Canada, is a sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

report which has collated the data and information gathered from surveys and a series of roundtable concerning six primary areas. These areas include: improving the engagement of volunteers ( pp. 3-5), improving conditions for paid staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

(pp. 7-9), developing better funding practices (pp. 11-13), providing more support for smaller organizations (pp. 15-17), collaborating and pooling resources (pp. 19-21), and finally, participating in policy development and communicating the value of the sector (pp. 23-25). Each sections contains an overview of the results of the survey and roundtable discussions, but more importantly, recommendations and actions that non-profits can take to address these issues.

Barr, C; Brock, K; Frankel, S; Hall, M; Murray, V; Nicol, R; Roach, R; Rowe, P; Scott, K. (2006). Strengthening the Capacity of Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations to Serve Canadians. 1-35. Toronto, Canada.

 

 

 

The Partnership Handbook

This resource, sponsored by Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC), extensively examines the various facets of partnerships including preparations, the process, and even various types of partnerships. The handbook draws attention to the differences in function of partnerships (p 8) and even the degrees of involvement of partnerships, including considerations (p 9-10). A partnership self-assessment is included so agencies can determine what work needs to be done prior to establishing or formalizing a partnership (p 19). The handbook draws attention to the three principal stages of developing effective partnerships (p 25) and methods that can be used to evaluate existing partnership agreements and relationships (p 40-42).

Frank, F; Smith, A. (2000). The Partnership Handbook. 1-82. Gatineau, QC, Canada.

Why Technology is Key to Building A Destination Workplace

Why Technology Is Key To Building A Destination Workplace.   Every organization wants to be known as an employer of choice — the kind of company where talented employees wish to work. But in reality, building a destination workplace is incredibly difficult and nuanced. It involves nearly every aspect of HR, from pay and benefits to training, diversity, transparent communication from leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

and so much more. It includes everything that makes up the employment relationship. It’s not so much a tangible thing as it is a particular type of psychological environment. But there are some tangible factors incorporated into designing a destination workplace, and one increasingly critical factor is technology. My organization's new survey on the future of work makes it crystal clear a company’s reputation as a digital leader has a huge bearing on its ability to attract and retain talent. Forty percent of survey respondents said they’ve left a job where they didn't have access to the latest digital tools, and 58% said they would need to find a new job to level up their digital skills. Today’s employees want to work in a digitally-savvy organization — meaning, employers must implement technologies for a more connected, efficient and modern workplace, as well as investing in strategies for training or re-skilling workers to be digitally competent. Making Digital Part Of The Experience Consider technology the new ping pong table. For years, having the latest digital tools was indicative of a great office environment, and it still is. Technology is a new means to create a framework to engage employees and is experiential, and employers need to tap into it. We did just that in our newest branch opening, where we mixed human-centered design and technology. A virtual assistant greets and connects guests with the person they’re meeting or information they’re seeking. Interactive kiosks use artificial intelligence (AI) and gamification software to help job seekers uncover well-matched career opportunities. The branch also features hoteling options with communal and individual workspaces. YOU MAY ALSO LIKE This kind of flexible IT infrastructure and layout is becoming more fundamental to the work experience, as agile and remote working grow. InCapital One’s 2017 Work Environment Survey, 85% of professional office workers called a flexible workplace "important," and 82% said their best ideas come while working in flexible spaces. While most companies today use digital tools for work in the simplest terms — virtual meetings, chatting, collaboration — they need to think bigger. Popular technologies like wearables for wellness are easy and fun to implement. And many of the most modern employers are already bringing AI, virtual reality and augmented reality (AR) into their workflow. One example is Boeing’s use of Google Glass to build planes faster, which has the potential to attract talent, as it’s an opportunity that professionals might not otherwise have to use innovative technology.   While not every company needs to simulate a process or environment with AR, actively looking for ways to integrate immersive technology is a huge, untapped opportunity to turn day-to-day work processes into employee experiences. Since the Capital One survey found 63% don't feel innovation is present enough in their current workplace design, this is an opportunity not to be missed. Getting People Comfortable With A Tech-Enabled Workplace Interactive technologies will be central to engaging people at work and enhancing their creativity and productivity. AI will improve the level of work people do by automating more mundane, administrative tasks. But none of this works without providing the training for employees to acquire new digital skills. Our study also revealed that 58% of workers do have access to the latest digital tools, but their employers may be lacking in training efforts. AI and automation can be a scary thing for employees if they feel threatened rather than empowered by it. Even office technology upgrades that are more entertainment-based or physical — like a virtual assistant — can go unused if not properly introduced. As you bring new digital tools into your office environment and experience, setting aside appropriate training resources so people can use them to their fullest is key. They don’t all have to be top-down training sessions. Tap into current employees' existing technology skills to lead lunch-and-learn sessions or demos during all-staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

meetings on how to use your latest and greatest technology. Destination workplaces aren’t just where people go to earn a paycheck. What makes them a destination is the fact that they deliver an intangible experience. Technology — and the appropriate training for it — should be part of the many components making up the experience, and early adopters will have an upper hand in achieving the sought-after “employer of choice” title.  
A Community Based Approach

What is Demonstrating Value?

Demonstrating Value offers a simple process and helpful resources to enable you to use information and data more effectively to run your organization, plan for the future and show your value to the community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

. It was designed by community for community.

10 Mistakes Nonprofit Organizations Make When Creating...

This short document from Mission Minded has some great points to get you thinking critically about your communications materials.

To start with good IT PROJECT MANAGEMENT, you need to consider some key aspects. If you want to manage project you have manage these key aspects. Following are the key aspects- 1.Initiation 2.Schedule management 3.Stake holder management 4.Change management 5.Risk and issues management

OCASI Accessibility

The degree to which organizations and their services can be accessed by as many diverse people as possible. Whether something is accessible can depend, for example, on service design, organizational climate and culture, physical structures. Accessibility is related to the concept of ‘barriers,’ which are practices, structures, attitudes, and other things that block access. See also the definition of anti-oppression.

Program

ACCESSIBILITY INITIATIVE

Accessibility Planning in the Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

Sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

: Newcomers

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

with Disabilities

Project Summary

OCASI's Accessibility Initiative (AI) allows settlement sector employees to acquire new skills and knowledge in areas related to service provision to immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

with disabilities. Through this initiative, settlement sector employees learn more about immigrants with disabilities and their diversities; gain a greater understanding of the different legislations that exist internationally, nationally, provincially/territorially as it relates to the rights of people with disabilities; examine the relationship between disabilityWhile disability is commonly understood as a restriction or lack of ability to perform an activity beyond the range of what is considered “normal”, disability rights activists challenge this definition. Instead, disability is a normal aspect of life. In fact, most people will experience some form of disability, either permanent or temporary, over the course of their lives. Rather than viewing the condition of the person as the source of the problem, an anti-oppression approach acknowledges that it is social discrimination and physical and institutional barriers that are the greatest challenge for those with disabilities., race, immigrant/refugee status and other layers of marginalization. Moreover, sector employees become better aware of the requirement of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (the Act) and what their organizations need to do to become accessible in the long term.

 Download our Accessibility Kit<

Module 1: Understanding Disability

This module allows us to interrogate the medical and social models of disability. We work towards gaining a greater understanding of how people with disabilities have been segregated, devalued, marginalized, and “minoritized” in many parts of the world with a focus on Canada.

Module 2: Inclusion, Accessibility and the Law

This module examines the relationship between accessibility and the law with a focus on understanding international, national, provincial/territorial legislations as they relate to people with disabilities.

Module 3: Immigrants and Racialized People with Disabilities

This module focuses on examining the relationship between disability, race, immigrant/refugee status and other layers of marginalization such as, socio-economic background, identity, age, etc.

Module 4: Direct Intervention

This module works through how to support newcomers with disabilities. Specifically, sector employees learn how to work with families who have children or young adults with disabilities and ways to support newcomers with disabilities in their own self-advocacy. Managers learn what they can realistically do to make their organizations more accessible (e.g. looking at their policies, diversifying their partnerships, including accessibility in their budgets to create a more accessible and inclusive environment).

DESCRIPTION

Moving to a new country presents many challenges and opportunities for newcomers. The settlement process can be especially challenging for newcomers with disabilities, who are further marginalized due to disability-related barriers in our communities and workplaces.

Learning who newcomers with disabilities are, how to welcome and accommodate them is something the settlement sector is becoming more aware of. While our broader understanding of disability has led to the enhancement of legislations and programs; when it comes to the unique obstacles facing newcomers with disabilities, service delivery has not been able to effectively address their needs.

OCASI is committed to supporting the settlement sector create welcoming, positive and inclusive spaces for all.

These webinars for Executive Directors including senior managers will provide you with an opportunity to learn:

<

Webinar 1:

  • How barriers intersect and interlock impacting the experiences of newcomers with disabilities in Canada
  • More about the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disability Act as it relates to supporting newcomers with disabilities

To view the power point: download<

Webinar 2:

  • How to complete an accessibility audit of your workplace including what accessibility features an office or meeting should include
  • How to develop an action plan for priority accessibility issues including organizational budget
  • Where to apply for accessibility funds/grants and how to include it in the current CFP Less

To view the power point: download<

To listen to the webinar follow the link below:
attendee.gotowebinar.com/recording/5551123414538763777<

To request information on this page in an alternative format please email me at cniles@ocasi.ca<

PROGRAM RESOURCES

Handouts for Managers [PDF]< 
Handouts for Sector Employees [PDF]<

 

Anti-Oppression and Diversity Policy - Sistering

An excellent sample policy and implentation plan from Sistering.

Anti-Racism Anti-Oppression Policy - IWSO

This is a sample anti-racism and anti-oppression policy from Immigrant Women Services Ottawa, including complaints process and definitions.

30 Ideas to Apply to Your Organization

This infographic from Vancouver-based Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

Solutions provides 30 tips to build your organization’s evaluation capacity.

Building Successful Collaborations: A Guide to...

This resource, developed by Cambridge & North Dumfries Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

Foundation, is framed as a guide for executive directors for successful agency-agency collaboration using a coordinated approach. The guide begins by noting the value of collaboration and the idea that agencies should conceive partnership as a spectrum, with varying levels and degrees (p 4). A useful list of questions is also presented to enable agencies to begin exploring whether they are ready to explore initiating a collaborative relationship (p 5). An important section to note is the area exploring conflict between parties. Because the majority of conflict is rooted in miscommunication, a useful table outlining the various types of conflict, the associated causes and signs, and practical solutions is presented to the reader (p 12).

Parkinson, C. (2006). Building Successful Collaborations: A Guide to Collaboration Among Non-Profit Agencies and Between Non-Profit Agencies and Businesses. 1-20. Cambridge, Ontario, Canada. 

CANADA EXCESSIVE DEMAND: OCASI Position Paper

CANADA EXCESSIVE DEMAND  http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/tools/medic/admiss/excessive.asp

Joint Submission on Medical Inadmissibility of Immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

<

OCASI POSITION PAPERS & BACKGROUNDERS<

November 16, 2017 - OCASI - Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants, together with Chinese and Southeast Asian Legal Clinic (CSALC) and South Asian Legal Clinic of Ontario (SALCO) made a joint submission to the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration, for their Study on Federal Government Policies and Guidelines Regarding Medical Inadmissibility of Immigrants.

Click here to download the Joint Submission [PDF].<

OCASI, CSALC and SALCO ask the Committee to recommend that Section 38(1)(c)< of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) should be repealed. The joint submission points out that the medical inadmissiblity rules discriminate against people with disabilities and people with medical conditions, the provision is applied inconsistently, and there are numerous exemptions that benefit only some applicants. The submission asks the Committee to recommend that the following groups should be exempt from the provision:

·        Caregivers and other migrant workers with pathway to permanent residence status

·        Applicants under the H&C application process; and

·        Sponsored parents and grandparents

Click here to read more about medical inadmissiblity and Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (IRPR) definition of “excessive demand on health and social services”.<

Click here to see more about the study by the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration.<

Case Management -Homelessness

Case Management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

- Homelessness

This document talks about reducing the risk of homelessness.

Case management refers to a collaborative and planned approach to ensuring that a person who experiences homelessness gets the services and supports they need to move forward with their lives. Originating from the mental health and addictions sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

, case management can be used more broadly to support anyone experiencing homelessness. It is a comprehensive and strategic form of service provision whereby a case worker assesses the needs of the client (and potentially their family) and, where appropriate, arranges, coordinates and advocates for delivery and access to a range of programs and services designed to meet the individual’s needs.

A client-centered case management approach ensures that the person who has experienced homelessness has a major say in identifying goals and service needs, and that there is shared accountability. The goal of case management is to empower people, draw on their strengths and capabilities, and promote an improved quality of life by facilitating timely access to the necessary supports, thus reducing the risk of homelessness and/or enhancing housing stability. 

In reviewing case management as a key component to ending homelessness, Milaney< identified it as a strengths-based team approach with six key dimensions:

  1. Collaboration and cooperation – a true team approach, involving several people with different backgrounds, skills and areas of expertise;
  2. Right matching of services – person-centered and based on the complexity of need;
  3. Contextual case management – Interventions must appropriately take account of age, ability, culture, gender and sexual orientation. In addition, an understanding of broader structural factors and personal history (of violence, sexual abuse or assault, for instance) must underline strategies and mode of engagement;
  4. The right kind of engagement – Building a strong relationship based on respectful encounters, openness, listening skills, non-judgmental attitudes and advocacy;
  5. Coordinated and well-managed system – Integrating the intervention into the broader system of care; and
  6. Evaluation for success – The ongoing and consistent assessment of case managed supports.

There are a number of useful resources to help service providers deliver case management in the homelessness sector. The Calgary Homeless Foundation has developed a report called “Dimensions of Promising Practice for Case Managed Supports in Ending Homelessness”<. In Australia, the government has a dedicated website< with a large number of resources for doing case management with people who have experienced homelessness. Finally, the National Alliance to End Homelessness also has a number of resources <dedicated to this topic.

Child Youth and Family Programs

Child, Youth And Family Programs

It is estimated that approximately 20% of those experiencing homelessness are between the ages of 13 and 24.<

One of the solutions for helping youth experiencing homelessness make healthy transitions to adulthood by avoiding life on the street is strengthening families and addressing their needs. There are a number of programs available to familes, youth and children experiencing homelessness (or at risk of homelessness). A Way Home Canada< features key examples of youth services, including:

·         School-based interventions<

·         Family reconnection<

·         Support for LGBTQ2S Youth<

·         Support for youth transitioning from care<

·         Employment, training and education<

·         Youth transitional housing< and Housing First<

With quality programming and appropriate prevention strategies and solutions to homelessness, we can ensure that 

See the Colour of Poverty campaign's fact sheets on the racialization of poverty and how it connects with education, health, employment, income, immigration, justice, housing, and food security.

Community Engagement Framework

This framework from Vancouver Coastal Health has some great suggestions: On improving your organization's engagement and responsiveness to the communities you work with, see all three selections listed below. Regarding facilitation of community capacity building, see just the second two.

This toolkit is designed to support Alberta’s Comprehensive Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

Institutions (CCIs), Community Adult Learning Councils (CALCs), community literacy providers, and other employment and training providers to assess adult learning needs through coordinated activities at the local level. The toolkit provides step-by-step instructions, tips, and sample tools to help CCIs and community partners ensure that educational programs and services are responsive to local learning and labour market needs. 

Community-Based Mental Health

Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

-Based Mental Health

To meet the needs of people experiencing homelessness that also experience mental health problems a number of community mental health services are required: 

Housing services:

Different types of subsidized and supported housing such as group homes, shared accommodation and apartments. Housing workers visit sites regularly offering counseling and holding tenants' meetings. Some agencies work with individuals to find appropriate housing in the private sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

. Some agencies provide 'safe houses,' which provide short-term accommodation for people in crisis, designed to prevent hospitalization. 

Employment services:

Agencies partner with local businesses to find jobs for people with a mental illness. Staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

may also provide skills teaching and job coaching

In the context of supervision of staff, coaching means the provision of ongoing and regular support: directing and offering feedback to staff to set and pursue goals, developing their capacity, addressing performance issues, and ensuring staff are equipped to excel. Modeling and demonstration of behaviours and tasks can be key aspects of coaching.

CAMH and Sketch help keep recently-housed youth permanently off the streets<

Developing Effective Coalitions: An Eight Step Guide

This resource, developed by the Prevention Institute, serves as a useful tool for organizations that are looking to strengthen existing coalitions or initiate and lead a coalition in order to influence outcomes or goals. It begins by outlining several key advantages of coalitions, including the fact that they can conserve resources, can have greater credibility than an individual organization, and they provide a forum for sharing information (pp. 4-5). The guide outlines the eight important steps to building an effective coalition. In each of the steps, it several suggestions and strategies are offered including important considerations. Of particular interest include the spectrum of intervention, which outlines different types of intervention methods (p 7), and a detailed summary of the six elements of a successful coalition structure (pp. 16-20).

Cohen, L; Baer, N; Satterwhite, P. (2002). Developing Effective Coalitions: An Eight Step Guide. 1-29. Oakland, CA, United States. 

Diversity Analytical Framework: A CAMH Frame of Reference...

This is a self- evaluation framework outlining the opportunities for discrimination, inclusion, and best practices

Best Practices / Good Practices / Promising Practices

Ways of working that are acknowledged as effective and deserving of emulation.

in governanceRefers to the source of strategic thinking and decisions that shape and direct an organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Includes anything related to non‐profit boards as well as strategic leadership issues., services, stakeholder

Here refers to a person or a group of people who have an interest in, or are affected by the organization now or in the near future.

relations, and HR policies and practices.

Pages 7-11, regarding Services, are particularly relevant for this standard.

Diversity at Work

Diversity at Work

Creating an inclusive and supportive work environment

Once an organization has successfully modified their recruitment and hiring practices to reach a more diverse audience, the next step is to successfully engage and support them as employees.

Visit the following HR Toolkit sections for information on HR practices that support an organization’s ability to engage and retain diverse teams. These practices are not exclusive to diversity and inclusion efforts but are considered particularly important to the successful engagement and retention of diverse talent.

Orientation< 
Employee engagement and retention< 
Performance management< 
Flexible work arrangements< 
Interpersonal communication< 
Learning & development<

Evaluation Toolkit

 This Evaluation Tool Kit will help you with the following:

 Select an Evaluator

 Engage Stakeholders & Select a Team

 Develop Evaluation Questions

 Using a Logic Model

A visual representation or work plan of how your program works. It lists what you put into your program (resources), what you do (activities), and what you plan to achieve (outputs and outcomes).

<

 How to Create a Logic Model

 Choose an Evaluation Design

 Create a Strategy

 Create a Budget

 Resources & References

 

1. Selecting a Design

Before you decide on the most appropriate evaluation design, it is important that you are clear about the primary evaluation questions. Once you have defined the most important evaluation questions, there are several designs that may be able to adequately answer your evaluation question. You can select a specific design by considering the following:

 Which design will provide me with the information I want?

 How feasible is each option?

 How valid and reliable do my findings need to be?

 Are there any ethical concerns related to choosing a specific design?

 How much would each option cost?

 

2. Types of Research Designs

Below we describe four types of research designs that offer suitable options depending on your specific needs and research questions.

1. Pre-experimental designs

2. Experimental designs

3. Quasi-experimental designs

4. Ex post facto designs

 Posttest – A test administered after a specific treatment or intervention. A posttest can help determine how study participants have responded to a treatment or intervention.

 Randomization (random assignment) – The process of randomly placing study participants in a treatment or control/comparison group.

 

Felder's and Silverman's Index of Learning Styles

This resource is an Index of Learning Styles originally developed by Richard Felder and Linda Silverman and summarized by Aman Consulting. According to this model of there are four dimensions of learning styles, and individuals should think of these dimensions as a continuum with one learning preference on the far left and the other on the far right. This resource serves as a useful tool for evaluating and presenting information and how this can be communicated with stakeholders

 

Felder, R; Silverman, L. (2002). Felder's and Silverman's Index of Learning Styles. 1. Waterloo, Canada. 

Abstract retrieved from YoutubeIt's a fact -- 70% of new business and 60% of jobs are attained through some sort of networking or relationship marketing. With statistics so compelling, how can you not spend time honing your networking skills. An entrepreneur, consultant and trainer, Lisa Mattam delivers an impactful and insightful presentation so you can take your networking skills to the next level. In her five good ideas, she explores the traditional channels for networking in addition to newer social media. She also provides concrete tips and tools that will enable the networker to leave an impression that lasts.Mattam, L. (January 19, 2011). Five Good Ideas about Knowing How to Work the Room. Maytree Foundation. 33:19. Retrieved from Youtube. 

From Diversity to Inclusion

Move from compliance to diversity as a business strategy

The world has become highly diverse, but many companies have not—especially when it comes to combining diversity with the inclusive culture needed to truly drive value.

WRITTEN BY

·         Many organizations promote diversity while struggling to fully leverage the business benefits of a diverse workforce.

·         Nearly one-third of respondents to the Human Capital Trends global survey say they are unprepared in this area, while only 20 percent claim to be fully “ready.”

·         In a recent study, 61 percent of employees report they are “covering” on some personal dimension (appearance, affiliation, advocacy, association)1< to assimilate in their organization.2<

·         Leading companies are working to build not just a diverse workforce, but inclusive workplaces, enabling them to transform diversity programs from a compliance obligation to a business strategy.

Guide for Writing Proposals

Sample Outline

The following is a sample outline for a project proposal. Note that all questions for a section may not apply to your proposal, and should be used as a general guide only.

1.     Introduction (1 or 2 paragraphs)

2.      Motivation (1 to 3 paragraphs)

3.       Project Summary (1 paragraph)

4.       Project Details

5.       Conclusion (1 paragraph)

6.       Conclusion (1 paragraph)

Guide to Planning Inclusive Meetings

This resource, developed by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, can serve as a guide to meetings that ensure inclusiveness and the removal of barriers in order to ensure the unrestricted and full participation of each individual present. The guide begins by offering strategies for selecting the appropriate venue while ensuring facilities are accessible and even planning safety and evacuation procedures (p. 5-7). Specific tips are offered for those conducting the meeting, including organizers, chairpersons, and presenters (pp. 9-14). An extensive accessibility

The degree to which organizations and their services can be accessed by as many diverse people as possible. Whether something is accessible can depend, for example, on service design, organizational climate and culture, physical structures. Accessibility is related to the concept of ‘barriers,’ which are practices, structures, attitudes, and other things that block access. See also the definition of anti-oppression.

checklist for planners is included that covers several important aspects of planning a meeting, including preliminary budget planning, scheduling considerations, meeting facility, and event registration (pp. 35-53). Lastly, a list of service providers and organizations  are included for agencies looking for additional resources and specific sources of information, including: the Canadian Abilities Foundation (CAF), the Canadian hearing Society (CHS), Employment EquityEquity is about fairness, justice, access to equal opportunity, recognizing inequalities and taking steps to address them. It requires eliminating barriers to economic, social and political opportunities and access to services. See also anti-oppression. Policy, and the Mental Health Commission of Canada (pp. 21-33).

 

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. (2009). Guide to Planning Inclusive Meetings. 1-56. Gatineau, QC, Canada.

 

This article from the Canadian Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse, provides questions and answers in dealing with stereotypes with the "elderly" and "seniors" so that they can be better served in our organizations.

 

 

Immigrant Seniors Forum Proceedings Report: Hearing the...

This report back from the Immigrant Seniors Advocacy Network provides first-hand accounts of what it is like to be an immigrant senior and the services they need, and includes recommendations on providing better services. See from page 9 on in particular.

Immigrant, Refugee & Settlement Hub

Immigrant, Refugee & Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

Hub

The Immigrant, Refugee and Settlement (IRS) hub – The Hub@791 – is a newly coordinated suite of programs and services to support the social, civic and economic integration of newcomers

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

to Canada.

IRS programs operate like a “hub,” delivering a hybrid model of classroom and online learning, as well as itinerant programs and services to meet the needs of immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

and refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

in the various communities within the Greater Toronto Area (GTA).

This page on the Canadian Council for Refugees website is a resource of links to recent media articles about refugees and immigrants. The articles can be filtred by date, type of article, and subjects.

This toolkit from the Ontario Healthy Communities Coalition is aimed at supporting inclusion of the full diversity of communities, particularly in small to mid-sized and volunteer-driven organizations. See section 3 for tips on holding inclusive community events, focus groups, and key informant interviews.

LGBTQ+ Guide to Online Safety

This guide was developed by VPN mentor. Whether you are part of the LGBTQ+ community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

or are an ally, we hope you find this guide helpful.

Worldwide survey conducted showed the challenges LGBTQ+ community faced online.

Here are some of our key findings:

·       73% of all respondents in all categories of gender identity and sexual orientation have been personally attacked or harassed online.

·       50% of all respondents in all categories of gender identity and sexual orientation have suffered sexual harassment online.

·       When it comes to sexual orientation, asexual people feel the least safe online, and gaySomeone who is attracted to and/or who has loving, romantic and/or sexual relationships primarily or exclusively with members of their own sex or gender. In certain contexts, this term is used to refer only to those who identify as men. Some may also prefer the term “queer” to describe themselves. men the safest.

·       When it comes to gender identity, transgender

This term has many definitions. It is frequently used as an umbrella term to refer to all people who deviate from their assigned gender or the binary gender system (of male and female), including intersex people, transsexuals, cross-dressers, transvestites, gender queers, drag kings, drag queens, two-spirit people, and others. Some transgendered people feel they exist not within one of the two standard gender categories, but rather somewhere between, beyond, or outside of those two genders. The term can also be applied exclusively to people who live primarily as the gender “opposite” to that which they are assigned at birth. These people may sometimes prefer the term “transsexual”. Some others may prefer not to identify as transgender or transsexual, but instead to identify as simply “men” or “women”. Transgender people may or may not want to change their bodies. Sometimes ‘transgender’ is shortened to “trans”.

women feel the least safe online, and cisgender men the safest.

·       Transgender women are the most likely to be outed against their will online, while cisgender men are least likely.

+For complete results, see the appendix.<

The Building Movement Project developed this set of case studies as a response to numerous requests from groups looking for real-life examples of the often-challenging process of incorporating social change models into social service work. The five case studies in this publication offer examples of organizations that are integrating social change activities into their work.

Maximize Your Time and Efforts – Collaborate!

This resource, developed by the Alberta Culture and Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

Spirit Department of the Government of Alberta, is a useful resource that examines the key factors for successful collaboration, and how the boardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization. can facilitate successful collaboration. Successful collaboration requires synergy and coordination of time and resources (p 2), in order for rewards to be jointly recognized and for the benefit of all parties involved. The resource continues by citing 6 key factors for successful collaboration, which include: internal and external conditions; purpose, planning, and progress; characteristics of the members; structure and process; communication and resources (p 3), and then examines each factor in greater detail (pp. 3-8). Checklist outlining the pre-conditions that need to be met in order to secure ongoing support for collaboration as well as what an organization is willing to contribute are also included (p 9).

Alberta Culture and Community Spirit, Government of Alberta. (2009). Maximize Your Time and Efforts – Collaborate! 1-10. Edmonton, Canada.

Meeting the Collaboration Challenge

This workbook, its companion videotape, and the Drucker Foundation Web site are designed to complement James Austin’s The Collaboration Challenge. Together these resources can help your nonprofit organization further its mission through strategic alliances with businesses. These resources can be used, alone or in combination, to encourage your boardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization., volunteers, and staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

to consider carefully whether and how to develop alliances with businesses.

Mental Health Awareness: Working Through It.

On this website, you will find a variety of ways to assist yourself and your employees who are experiencing mental issues. Learn how employees managed their mental health at work and off work in Working Through It

Increase mental health awareness – for yourself, for your team and for your organization. These resources can help reduce stigma, increase wellness, and improve workplace psychological health and safety. Free resources, videos and strategies are provided.

 Individual Awareness<

If you are a manager or team leader, you may already be thinking about how you can increase mental health awareness with very little time or budget. How about having access to a sustainable, no-cost approach that is available to you every week?

Begin a Workplace Dialogue

To help make this even more effective, consider what's being discussed in each week's email and use it as an opportunity to open dialogue within your team.

The timing to get started using this resource is ideal. The National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace raises the urgency, as well as the responsibility, for employers and organizations to increase awareness about mental health and mental illness in the workplace.

Increasing Mental Health Awareness in 5 Minutes a Week

The Working Through It weekly emails will include links to a short video clip or a resource document that you can share with employees to inform and inspire them about taking charge of their mental health issues at work, off work and when returning to work.

 

The purpose of this service is to open dialogue, increase understanding and remove some of the stigma that surrounds mental health issues. Viewing the videos and resources will take, on average, less than five minutes of an employee's time each week. They are not intended to be sent to specific individuals, but rather to your entire team including, if possible and appropriate, any team members who are away from work on leave.

Mental Issues Working Through It Part 2

Mental Issue:  Working through It Part 2

Referring Individuals<

Suggested wording so you can sensitively recommend Working Through It to an employee who appears to be struggling with a mental health concern. 

SUMMARY: When employees are struggling with mental health issues, you may be concerned about invading privacy or being seen as harassing. Working Through It is a resource that provides employees with practical strategies for personal coping strategies at work, off work and returning to work. Below are tactful suggestions for referring your employees to this resource.

Making the referral

Working Through It speaks directly to people struggling with mental health issues through videos and related resources. Review this resource yourself to make it easier to recommend it to your employees.

Every situation is unique depending upon your history with the employee, the nature of your relationship, and current circumstances. Here are a few ways of referring employees to Working Through It that you may want to adapt for your own use.

Mental health issues

"Sometimes things can seem overwhelming. There is a resource that includes videos of people who have gone through tough times at work, talking about how they coped, and what they did to get back to a place of wellness. I can send you the link to Working Through It if you want to see if any of their strategies might be useful for you."

DisabilityWhile disability is commonly understood as a restriction or lack of ability to perform an activity beyond the range of what is considered “normal”, disability rights activists challenge this definition. Instead, disability is a normal aspect of life. In fact, most people will experience some form of disability, either permanent or temporary, over the course of their lives. Rather than viewing the condition of the person as the source of the problem, an anti-oppression approach acknowledges that it is social discrimination and physical and institutional barriers that are the greatest challenge for those with disabilities. leave

"It can be hard to navigate the disability system, especially when you are not feeling well. I heard about a resource called Working Through It where someone from the insurance industry talks about how to get help filling out the paperwork, how to respond to the letters and how to make things happen more smoothly. Do you want me to send you the link?"

Returning to work

"Before you return to work, you may want to hear about how some other people found a way to return successfully that was healthy for them. Working Through It includes their stories, and speaks about creating a plan that works for you, talking to co-workers, helping your supervisor help you and coping with any workplace stressors. Would you like me to send you the link?"

Co-worker issues

"It can be tough to work through these types of issues, and the impact on workplace relationships. There is a resource called Working Through It where they share approaches to dealing with gossip, conflict and other issues in the workplace. I can send you the link to it if you want to have a look."

Job insecurity

"I remember hearing people in one of the videos on Working Through It talk about how they dealt with the worry of losing their jobs. They share ideas for dealing with debt issues or replacing income when unemployed.

Working Through It is an initiative of Mental Health Works< and the Mood Disorders Association of Ontario<, funded through The Great-West Life Assurance Company's national corporate citizenship program in support of the Great-West Life Centre for Mental Health in the Workplace.

Mental Issues Working through It Part 3

Mental Issues Working Through It Part 3 Education for Leaders using 'Working through It'

A framework for a 3-hour session with supervisors, managers and executives using Working Through It.

SUMMARY: One inexpensive way to increase mental health awareness is to use the free resource Working Through It. What follows is an outline of a session you can facilitate for your leaders, including supervisors, managers, union representatives and executives. This will better prepare them to support employees with mental health issues.

Suggested three-hour awareness session for leaders

The following framework can be modified to meet your timing needs and group size.

10 MINUTES

Introduction of the topic

Explain why this is an issue – turnover, absenteeism, disabilityWhile disability is commonly understood as a restriction or lack of ability to perform an activity beyond the range of what is considered “normal”, disability rights activists challenge this definition. Instead, disability is a normal aspect of life. In fact, most people will experience some form of disability, either permanent or temporary, over the course of their lives. Rather than viewing the condition of the person as the source of the problem, an anti-oppression approach acknowledges that it is social discrimination and physical and institutional barriers that are the greatest challenge for those with disabilities., conflict, performance problems, human rights complaints, duty to accommodate, grievances, etc.

Share senior management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

's support for the strategy of addressing mental health issues.

Be explicit that this is part of a wider strategy that includes education, training,changes in processes and procedures, development of resources, and measurement of effectiveness.

Discuss how participants will be recognized for their efforts to support positive workplace mental health and why this matters to them.

10 MINUTES

Identification of issues

  • Hold an open discussion about what supervisors see that may indicate an employee has a mental health concern. You are looking for examples of behaviours rather than symptoms.
  • Ask what makes these behaviours challenging for leaders.
  • Record the answers to use in a follow-up meeting to brainstorm solutions.

 

60 MINUTES

Viewing the first half of the video

Before viewing, ask participants to write down the following discussion points:

  • Information learned about mental illness 
    ("aha" moments or "I did not know that!")
  • Questions that arose
  • One "test the team" question to ask the group

They will be engaging in discussion about these points half way through watching the video.

If you are viewing online, go to http://www.workplacestrategiesformentalhealth.com/wti/WatchAllPage.aspx<

Pause at the end of Dr. Anthony Levitt talking about "Concerns with Medication" and before Gord Conley talks about "My Experience in a Treatment Centre" (approximately 60 minutes).

15 MINUTES

Facilitate discussion about the three points.

BREAK – 10 MINUTES

50 MINUTES

Resume video and ask participants to continue thinking about the discussion points.

20 MINUTES

Facilitate discussion from second half of the video using the discussion points.

5 MINUTES

Wrap up: Ask participants what they will do differently as a result of what they have learned.

Consider assigning the first episode on Managing Mental Health Matters< as a next step in leader education.

To learn more about facilitating Managing Mental Health Matters, see the Managing Mental Health Matters Leader's Guide<.

Montana Advocacy and Communications Nonprofit Toolkit

This resource, developed by the Montana Nonprofit Association, serves as a basic guide for organizations to communicate advocacy and lobbying efforts with policymakers and members of the media and build/maintain important relationships with key actors. While advocacy work seeks to affect an aspect of society by appealing to different actors, lobbying refers to specific efforts to influence legislation (p. 4). The resource continues by providing a thorough overview of the lobbying process, including tips for lobbying by letter and phone (pp. 10-12) with two sample letters as templates. The final section details information for organizations looking to work and build relationships with the media by outlining how to generate coverage of an issue (pp. 28-29), and tips for writing an effective press release along with a press release template (pp. 30-33).

Montana Nonprofit Association. (2008). Montana Advocacy and Communications Nonprofit Toolkit. 1-54. Helena, MT, United States.

Moving From Diversity to Inclusion

Moving From Diversity to Inclusion<

Do you know what you need to create an action plan for shifting from diversity management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

to inclusion?

As a start, a common definition of “diversity” and “inclusion” is needed. Diversity means all the ways we differ. Some of these differences we are born with and cannot change. Anything that makes us unique is part of this definition of diversity. Inclusion involves bringing together and harnessing these diverse forces and resources, in a way that is beneficial. Inclusion puts the concept and practice of diversity into action by creating an environment of involvement, respect, and connection—where the richness of ideas, backgrounds, and perspectives are harnessed to create business value. Organizations need both diversity and inclusion to be successful.

A list of upcoming holidays and celebrations from a variety of cultures.

National Settlement Service Standards Framework

 

This resource, a discussion paper developed for the National Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

Conference of 2003, shares some agreed-upon norms as a result of consultation and collaboration between various levels of government and non-profit agencies. The document first defines different service types and service areas along with a list of activities (p 14-16) that agencies within the Settlement Sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

are engaged in. This resource also explores how agencies can use various models in order to effectively measure settlement outcomes (p 20) and even provides a sample exercise in program evaluation using the Program Logic Model

A visual representation or work plan of how your program works. It lists what you put into your program (resources), what you do (activities), and what you plan to achieve (outputs and outcomes).

(p 23). Lastly, the resource explores and list minimum core competenciesA set of knowledge, skills and abilities required to perform a job. for Settlement Workers (p 31-33) and even model job descriptions (p 41-43).

Wong-Tam, M. (2003). National Settlement Service Standards

Desired and achievable levels of performance against which actual performance can be compared. Standards help to bolster public confidence, promote transparency and accountability, enhance performance and effectiveness, and help organizations achieve their mission, improve their practices, and educate board and staff about good practices.

Framework. 1-64. Calgary, Canada. 

 

Organizational Capacity Assessment for Community-Based...

Organizational CapacityA multi‐faceted concept referring broadly to an organization’s power, strength, and ability to grow, develop, and accomplish its goals. Elements of capacity can include knowledge, people and resources. Assessment for Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

-Based Organizations

The Organizational Capacity Assessment (OCA) is a structured tool for a facilitated self-assessment of an organization's capacity followed by action planning for capacity improvements. The OCA format helps the organization reflect on its processes and functions, and score itself against benchmarks. At the end of this assessment you will learn how to involve your staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

and boardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization. in your discussions as you question the mission, goals and programs of the organization.

Organizational Capacity Assessment for Community-Based Organizations Goal: The goal of this tool is to assist organizations in assessing the critical elements for effective organizational management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

, and identifying those areas that need strengthening or further development. Purpose: The OCA tool was designed to enable organizations to define a capacity-building improvement plan, based on self-assessed need. This Organizational Capacity Assessment (OCA) was initially designed to measure overall capacity of organizations funded by President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) under the New Partners Initiative (NPI). This OCA tool provides organizations with a set of criteria to assess their current management capacity to implement quality health programs, to identify key areas that need strengthening. Although many capacity assessments exist, the structure and process of this tool distinguishes it from others. Multi-level and multi-department involvement fosters team building and organizational learning. Inclusion of management, compliance, and program components ensure a holistic understanding of the organization’s strengths and challenges and the guided self-assessment by skilled facilitators instills ownership on the part of the organization for its improvement plan.

The OCA tool assesses technical capacity in seven domains, and each domain has a number of sub-areas.

OCA Domains:

1. GovernanceRefers to the source of strategic thinking and decisions that shape and direct an organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Includes anything related to non‐profit boards as well as strategic leadership issues.<

2. Administration

3. Human Resources

4. Financial Management

5. Organizational Management

6. Program Management

7. Project Performance Management

Outreach and Communication Strategy

Outreach and Communication Strategy

For outreach to be efficient and effective you need a plan. Developing an outreach strategy takes work, but is well worth the effort. Unfortunately, there is no “one-size-fits-all” approach. The following steps can serve as a guide. Once you have looked back on previous outreach activities and reflected on the degrees of success or failure, set the goals and outcomes for your new outreach campaign.

Develop and Carry Out Your Plan

Once you have completed all the preliminary steps, creating the actual plan should not be difficult. Your plan should include:

  • Budget
  • Key Audience(s)
  • Key Message(s)
  • Method(s) of Distribution:
    • Press Releases
    • Articles
    • Letters to the Editor
    • Social media
    • Press Conferences; Radio, Television or Press Interviews; and Media Tours
    • Spokespersons (successful learners, community

      The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

      leaders, celebrities, etc.)
    • Seminars or Speaking Engagements
    • Tables at events
    • Intended Response
    • Timelines

Partnership Toolkit: Tools for Building and Sustaining...

This document is an extensive resource touching on many aspects of partnership and collaboration. Read the whole thing, or choose a section based on your organization`s top priorities.

Pathways to Gender Justice: A Toolkit for People Working in...

Canadian Council for Refugees toolkit for adopting a gender analysis.

Policy and Procedures on External Communications - IWSO

This sample policy from Immigrant Women Services Ottawa outlines their communications activities, where responsibility for those activities lies, and who acts as agency spokesperson in certain situations.

Policy Recommendations and Best Practices for Agencies...

Provided by the Trans Programmes at The 519, this succinct one-pager provides recommendations for organizational policies and best practices that aim to improve service accessibility for trangender and transsexual community members.

Positive Spaces Starter Kit - OCASI

This starter kit aims to share resources and increase organizational capacity to serve more effectively LGBTQ newcomers. It includes amongst other: tips for supporting LGBTQ clients, an overview of laws protecting the LGBTQ community, and tips and tools on how to make your agency a positive space.

Practical Strategies for Working with Trans Clients

Recommendations for working with trans clients, and standards and indicators for making your organization inclusive of trans people.

The document refers to 'patients,' but is nonetheless applicable to our sector.

Racial Equity Organizational Self-Assessment

This one page questionnaire is aimed at raising organizational awareness and contributing to organizational change towards racial equity. Questions cover both organizational operations and staff competencies, and next steps are suggested based on your 'Racial Equity Score.'

To see the whole Race Matters Toolkit from the Annie E. Casy Foundation, go to http://www.aecf.org/KnowledgeCenter/PublicationsSeries/RaceMatters.aspx

This is a Toronto network with the mandate to address barriers to services and resources faced by non-status women impacted by gender-based violence through coordinated public education and advocacy for the purpose of systemic change.

Sample Client Rights and Responsibilities Policy - Access...

This is a 2-page sample policy from Access Alliance Multicultural Community Health Services.

Sample Research Policy - Access Alliance

This sample research policy from Access Alliance outlines guiding principles and priorities for research, ethics, process, and considerations for dissemination.

Sample Research Publication and Authorship Policy - Access...

This policy sample from Access Alliance includes guidelines for research authorship and addressing validity and misconduct in publication.

Access Alliance's statement of Anti-Oppression Principles and Practice, posted on their website, describes their understanding of oppression and its impacts, what it means for the people they serve and the context they work in, and what their commitment is as an organization.

Sample Statement of Values and Principles Guiding Research...

This sample from Access Alliance lists and explains the values and principles they choose to guide their research: Community benefit, capacity building, collaboration and inclusion, and equity and dignity.

Serving LGBTQ+ Newcomers

Positive Spaces Initiative (PSI)

The Positive Spaces Initiative (PSI)< aims to support the settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

to more effectively serve LGBTQ+ (lesbian

Women who have the potential to be attracted to and/or who have loving, romantic and/or sexual relationships primarily or exclusively with other women. Some women may also use the term “gay” or “queer” to describe themselves.

, gaySomeone who is attracted to and/or who has loving, romantic and/or sexual relationships primarily or exclusively with members of their own sex or gender. In certain contexts, this term is used to refer only to those who identify as men. Some may also prefer the term “queer” to describe themselves., bisexual

Someone who is attracted to and/or who has loving, romantic and/or sexual relationships with both men and women. Some people avoid this term because of its implication that there are only two sexes/genders to be attracted to, reinforcing the binary gender system (of male and female). Instead, they may use terms such as ‘queer’.

, trans, two-spirit, queer

Often used as an umbrella term encompassing lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, questioning people, transgender/transsexual people, and anyone else who does not identify strictly as heterosexual or conform to gender norms. Some people identify as queer to distance themselves from the rigid categorizations of “straight” and “gay”. Originally a derogatory word, it has now been reclaimed by some people and used as a statement of empowerment. Some others, however, reject the use of this term due to perceived connotations of deviance and its tendency to gloss over and sometimes deny the differences between these groups. In the past 10-20 years this term has gained wide usage, so it tends to be mostly younger people who use this term.

, questioning

A term used to describe someone who is exploring their sexual or gender identity. People’s identities grow and shift over a lifetime and a person may question their sexual orientation or gender identity at any point in their life. ‘Questioning’ is thus included in the umbrella term LGBTTIQQ2S to show that there is always a place for people who are questioning.

, intersex

Someone who is born with a body that is a combination of male and female elements.

, asexual, pansexual, genderqueer, etc.) newcomers

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

. PSI encourages training, education, leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

and resource-sharing to support LGBTQ+ newcomers, staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

, volunteers and community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

members.

LGBTQ+ individuals are an integral, though often invisible, part of immigrant and refugee communities. Immigrant and refugee serving organizations have an obligation and responsibility to provide relevant, effective and appropriate services for these immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

and refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

who are often marginalized within multiple communities.

PSI has been traveling throughout the province of Ontario to deliver free workshops to staff members, from front-line workers to senior management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

and boardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization. members, on how to create welcoming spaces in their agencies that are inclusive and free from discrimination based on sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression.

The Positive Spaces Initiative is funded by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC).

 

 Go to PositiveSpaces.ca<

 

This guidebook developed by the Building Movement Project was developed for staff and board members of nonprofit service organizations who are interested in learning how to incorporate progressive social change values and practices into their work. Progressive social change aims to transform the underlying systemic problems that result in inequalities in the distribution of power and resources—inequalities that directly affect the lives of those served by the vast majority of nonprofit service organizations.

Strategic Communications Planning for Not-for-Profit...

This guide produced by the Institute for Media, Policy and Civil Society for the Centre des organismes communautaire (Centre for Community Organizations) outlines thow to develop a strategic communications plan. Includes developing buy-in, identifying audiences, strategies, budgeting, and evaluating your plan. See page 64 for an outline of a strategic communications plan.

Strategies for Effective Proposal Writing

Strategies for Effective Proposal Writing

Readiness is an important element of a successful proposal. Funders will want to know if you are an accountable organization. The following chart will help you self-assess your strengths and weaknesses by taking a look at the “workings” of your organization. z Why does your organization exist? z Who implements your goals and objectives? (the “work”) z How do you do it? are you a formal or informal organization? do you work well with others? do you leverage small successes into bigger ones (i.e. dollars, partnerships, timing)?

Once you are satisfied that you are indeed ready to develop your proposal and are targeting the appropriate funder, it is time to put pen to paper.

Attribution. (Ontario Healthy Communities Coalition)

By Jon Russell. This short tutorial highlights the main ways humans get into trouble trying to communicate, and describes effective new ways to communicate which avoids these pitfalls.

Toolkit for Working with LGBTQ Refugees and Immigrants

This toolkit, developed by the Among Friends project - an LGBTQ refugee & immigrant initiative, provides a glossary of terms, tips on what to say when clients disclose their sexual identity, language and attitude do's and don'ts, dealing with homophobic comments and name-calling, myths about LGBTQ people, and more.

Trans Inclusion Policy - Centre for Women and Trans People

This is a sample Trans Inclusion Policy. "Trans" is an inclusive term for transgender

This term has many definitions. It is frequently used as an umbrella term to refer to all people who deviate from their assigned gender or the binary gender system (of male and female), including intersex people, transsexuals, cross-dressers, transvestites, gender queers, drag kings, drag queens, two-spirit people, and others. Some transgendered people feel they exist not within one of the two standard gender categories, but rather somewhere between, beyond, or outside of those two genders. The term can also be applied exclusively to people who live primarily as the gender “opposite” to that which they are assigned at birth. These people may sometimes prefer the term “transsexual”. Some others may prefer not to identify as transgender or transsexual, but instead to identify as simply “men” or “women”. Transgender people may or may not want to change their bodies. Sometimes ‘transgender’ is shortened to “trans”.

, transexual, gender variant individuals. To access the policy online, please visit http://womenscentre.sa.utoronto.ca<.

Professional development

All types of facilitated learning opportunities that aim to increase a person’s skills or knowledge, leading to personal development and career advancement. Learning opportunities may include courses, workshops, coaching, etc and may be specific to the present demands on an organization’s staff or leadership, or may be more broadly relevant to a person’s career goals.

in the nonprofit sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

is a vital tool for strengthening organizational effect­iveness in the face of continuous change. It stands against a backdrop in which community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

needs are many, resources are few and both funding and policy parameters are continuously in flux. At the same time, the field of professional development is itself evolving to meet the challenges of satisfying current training needs, responding to emerging ones and developing cost-effective options for how, when and what training is delivered. Is the level of demand for training.

Working in Partnership: Recipes for Success

This resource, developed by the Wild Rose Foundation, has been developed in response to emerging trends encouraging increased collaboration amongst non-profit organizations as a result of a decrease in the prominence and role of the government (p 5). This work book is intended to enable agencies to use a step-by-step approach to connecting with other agencies and supporting mutually benefitting partnerships. A number of useful checklists are provided which allow agencies to first evaluate and name their vision, realities, partnership priorities and expectations (p11). Important questions surrounding compatibility, in order to ensure the partnership is mutually benefiting, are explored (p 20 -22) and even tools for enhancing existing partnerships (p 34-36).

Wild Rose Foundation. (June 2001). Working in Partnership: Recipes for Success. 1-42. Edmonton, Canada. 

Improving Conditions for Immigrants & Refugees

2017 OCASI Professional Development Conference Needs...

2017 OCASI Professional Development Conference

Needs Assessment Results
 
1. Working with Individual Clients
·       Case management 82.86%
·       Assisting Clients in Accessing Services 81.16%
·       Strength ­based Approach in Settlement Work 73.91%
2. Supporting Specific Communities
·       Working with Refugees 79.71
·       Working with Newcomer Youth 75.71%
·       Women’s Programming 64.29%
·       Services for Persons Living with Disabilities 64.29%
3. Working at the Broader Community Level
·       Effective Partnership Development and Collaboration 82.86%
·       Working with Communities to Welcome Immigrants and Refugees 79.41%
·       Building Immigrant Capacity for Community Development and Engagement 77.14%
4. Understanding & Addressing Broader Issues Affecting Immigrant Settlement & Integration
·       Systemic Barriers Affecting Immigrants and Refugees: An Advocacy approach 81.43%
·       Immigration Trends and Updates on Legislation 81.16%
·       Addressing Violence Against Immigrant Women 74.29%
·       Immigration Categories: What the Settlement Worker Needs to Know 72.46%
5. General Professional and Personal Development
·       Conflict Resolution Strategies 78.26%
·       Intercultural Communication Skills 77.14%
·       Outcome ­Based Measurement &Service Evaluation: Tools, Practices &Models 75.71%
6. Information and/or Roundtable Discussions on Sectoral Issues
·       Development for Settlement Workers: Tools, Practices and Models 84.29%
·       Core Competencies for Settlement Workers 75.71%
Career Planning and Advancement in the Immigrant and Refugee-Serving Sector 65.71%

Access to Support and Services

Access to Supports & Services

This article provides information on Governments, charitable organizations, faith communities and/or the non-profit sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

that may provide services. 

Too often services are directed at emergency supports rather than prevention programs that help keep people from becoming unhoused, or housing and supports to help end homelessness. 

Many people experiencing homelessness face barriers in accessing services due to lack of identification (such as health cards) and/or a lack of funds (for service feeds). In addition, there is evidence that many people who experience visible homelessness, or who have substance use problems or mental health challenges may be denied service or dissuaded from accessing services. 

There are a variety of types of services and supports that are required to help an individual end their homelessness. These include:

  1. Permanent Housing that is affordable and suitable for the individual or family. In some cases, this includes permanent supportive housing or housing with access to a variety of community

    The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

    supports.
  2. Transitional Housing that allows for a period of adjustment and higher level support. This could include second-stage housing for women and families feeling violence, halfway houses for ex-offenders, culturally appropriate housing for Indigenous Peoples or newcomers

    In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

    to Canada, or housing to help long-term shelter users adjust to independent living. 
  3. Emergency Shelters which provide a respite from living on the street or support to those who have no options for a place to live. They can include violence against women shelters, or shelters designed for people experiencing homelessness. Ideally a community will have a variety of shelter options available to suit the unique needs of their clientele.

Allies in Refugee Integration

Allies in Refugee Integration(ARI)

Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

services are proven to have a positive effect on refugee integration. They provide accurate information and advice, increase newcomers

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

’ support networks and help the newcomer navigate a new community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

. Private sponsors are volunteers who commit to providing financial and practical support to refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

for a year, and for some, that automatically entails collaboration with settlement professionals. But for many, the lack of clear protocols, tools and a shared understanding leaves both private sponsors and settlement service providers struggling to collaborate effectively. Close teamwork is not happening consistently, and confusion around roles and responsibilities hampers efforts to meet the needs of refugees in a coordinated manner. This is the gap the ARI project aims to address.

  1. Research - conducting an environmental scan to establish a picture of the current situation, including existing promising practices

    Ways of working that are acknowledged as effective and deserving of emulation.

    around collaboration, through focus groups, interviews and surveys.
  2. Design - generating innovative ideas and solutions through collaborative design workshops with multiple stakeholders.
  3. Evaluation - Pilot-testing and evaluating selected ideas for effectiveness, feasibility and impact on refugee settlement.

Basic Guide to Program Evaluation

Program Evaluation

A Brief Introduction ...

Note that the concept of program evaluation can include a wide variety of methods to evaluate many aspects of programs in nonprofit or for-profit organizations. There are numerous books and other materials that provide in-depth analysis of evaluations, their designs, methods, combination of methods and techniques of analysis. However, personnel do not have to be experts in these topics to carry out a useful program evaluation. The "20-80" rule applies here, that 20% of effort generates 80% of the needed results. It's better to do what might turn out to be an average effort at evaluation than to do no evaluation at all. (Besides, if you resort to bringing in an evaluation consultant, you should be a smart consumer. Far too many program evaluations generate information that is either impractical or irrelevant -- if the information is understood at all.) This document orients personnel to the nature of program evaluation and how it can be carried out in a realistic and practical manner.

Some Major Types of Program Evaluation

Goals-Based Evaluation

Process-Based Evaluations

Outcomes-Based Evaluation

Four Levels of Evaluation:

There are four levels of evaluation information that can be gathered from clients

This term is used here to refer to the service-users that organizations work for and with and provide services to. We have chosen to use clients because of its common currency and ease of use, while acknowledging that it may unintentionally connote a particular ideology of patronage or a purely financial transactional relationships between organizations and the people they serve.

, including getting their:
1. reactions and feelings (feelings are often poor indicators

Evidence or measures that show that a certain condition exists or certain results have or have not been achieved. They tell you how much progress has been made toward the intended goals, objectives, outputs or outcomes. Here, indicators are the practical and measurable markers that monitor specific aspects of a standard. Meeting certain indicators means the achievement of some level of the standard.

that your service made lasting impact)
2. learning (enhanced attitudes, perceptions or knowledge)
3. changes in skills (applied the learning to enhance behaviors)
4. effectiveness (improved performance because of enhanced behaviors)

https://managementhelp.org/evaluation/program-evaluation-guide.htm<

Bill 148, Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, 2017

http://www.ontla.on.ca/bills/bills-files/41_Parliament/Session2/b148rep1_e.pdf<

 

Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, 2017

This reprint of the Bill is marked to indicate the changes that were made in Committee.

An Act to amend the Employment Standards

Desired and achievable levels of performance against which actual performance can be compared. Standards help to bolster public confidence, promote transparency and accountability, enhance performance and effectiveness, and help organizations achieve their mission, improve their practices, and educate board and staff about good practices.

Act, 2000, the Labour Relations Act, 1995 and the Occupational Health and Safety Act and to make related amendments to other Acts

Section 23.1 (Determination of minimum wage) is amended to increase the minimum wage on January 1, 2018. The minimum wage increases again on January 1, 2019 and is subject to an annual inflation adjustment on October 1 of every year starting in 2019.  The minimum wage for employees who serve liquor now applies only if the employee also regularly receives tips or other gratuities from their work.

Boosting Settlement Services

Boosting Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

Services

Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration<

Ontario is helping to boost capacity for settlement agencies in six communities where federally funded Resettlement Assistance Program agencies are located, and which are expected to receive the majority of refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

from the Syrian conflict - who began arriving yesterday.  

Earlier this year, Ontario committed $8.5 million <over two and a half years to help deliver both settlement and integration supports to refugees, as well as to help organizations and groups that are supporting private sponsors. Ontario is allocating over $3.7 million of this funding to eight settlement agencies in six communities. These funds will help provide comprehensive, community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

-based supports for refugees, such as: 

·         First-language settlement services

·         Specialized supports for refugee women and youth

·         Access to trauma counselling and mental health services

·         Housing assistance

·         Employment supports.

The organizations receiving funding are: Arab Community Centre of Toronto (Toronto), Catholic Centre for Immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

(Ottawa), COSTI Immigrant Services (Toronto), London Cross Cultural Learner Centre (London), Malton Neighbourhood Services (Mississauga), Multicultural Council of Windsor and Essex County (Windsor), Reception House Waterloo Region (Kitchener-Waterloo) and Wesley Urban Ministries (Hamilton).

More organizations will receive funding for refugee-targeted settlement services in the coming months to meet a range of needs and address service gaps in communities where refugees will settle.

The province is encouraging Ontarians to either post, or sign up to receive information on volunteer opportunities to help welcome refugees at SPARK Ontario<, specifically on its webpage on Welcoming Syrian Refugees.<

Quick Facts

·         In 2014, Ontario welcomed more than 11,400 refugees from around the world to start a new life in the province.

·         The federal government is responsible for refugee selection, screening and the provision of settlement services, including finding interim lodging.

·         On December 4, 2015, Ontario allocated $1.8 million< to several organizations that help attract and support private refugee sponsors.

Background Information

·         Settlement Agencies and Refugee Sponsorship Support Organizations<

Change Management Best Practices Guide

This Change Management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

Best Practices

Best Practices / Good Practices / Promising Practices

Ways of working that are acknowledged as effective and deserving of emulation.

Guide is designed to give general guidance to public sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

bodies undertaking change. It is not intended to be prescriptive nor exhaustive. A 'one-size-fits-all' approach to managing change is ineffective, as each public sector organisation is different, with its own structure, history, culture and needs, and each change event is different. This Guide is intended as a tool to disseminate ideas and best practice guidance on common change success factors and the sorts of actions that public sector organisations can undertake to address them.

Changes to the Citizenship Act as a Result of Bill C-6

Changes to the Citizenship Act as a Result of Bill C-6

Backgrounder

Bill C-6, an Act to amend the Citizenship Act and make consequential amendments to another Act, received Royal Assent on June 19, 2017. This chart explains the changes that have been made to the Citizenship Act and indicates when these changes are expected to come into force.

 

  1. Changes expected to take effect in 2018
  2. Changes that already took effect as of January 11, 2018
  3. Changes that took effect as of October 11, 2017
  4. Changes that took effect immediately upon Royal Assent on June 19, 2017
Changes to the Citizenship Act as a Result of Bill C-6

Backgrounder

Bill C-6, an Act to amend the Citizenship Act and make consequential amendments to another Act, received Royal Assent on June 19, 2017. This chart explains the changes that have been made to the Citizenship Act and indicates when these changes are expected to come into force.

 

  1. Changes expected to take effect in 2018
  2. Changes that already took effect as of January 11, 2018
  3. Changes that took effect as of October 11, 2017
  4. Changes that took effect immediately upon Royal Assent on June 19, 2017

Communication Access for People who have Communication...

This booklet is intended to inform organizations about providing accessible goods and services to people who have communication disabilities, and may be a helpful resource in complying with the customer service standard under the Accessibility

The degree to which organizations and their services can be accessed by as many diverse people as possible. Whether something is accessible can depend, for example, on service design, organizational climate and culture, physical structures. Accessibility is related to the concept of ‘barriers,’ which are practices, structures, attitudes, and other things that block access. See also the definition of anti-oppression.

for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (AODA)

The Accessibility Directorate of Ontario (2009) Communication Access for People who have Communication Disabilities

Community Based Approaches to Disaster Mitigation

 

This resource, developed by the Center for Disaster Preparedness, explores the use of community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

based approaches to mitigate risks and reduce the impact of disasters, shifting away from a top-down approach (pp. 269-270). This document explores and offers an in-depth analysis of community based disaster management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

(CBDM) in which its aims are chiefly to transform vulnerable communities to disaster-resilient communities. The methodology of CBDM as well as an explanation of the various steps involved in this process is detailed (pp. 274-276). Lastly, a section that highlights the importance of community participation and appropriate methods for enhancing such participation in a sustainable manner is included as a guiding framework for non-profit organizations (pp. 282-285).

Victoria, L. (26 September, 2002). Community Based Approaches to Disaster Mitigation. 269-314. New York, United States. 

 

Community Resources for Immigrants and Refugees in Ontario

Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

Resources for Immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

& Refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

in Ontario

What types of services would immigrants need?

Federally funded  programs are another service utilized by immigrants. Here are some common problems faced by new immigrants in Canada that service providers organizations assist newcomers

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

with...

In this article you will find a list of organizations that delivered services to newcomers in Ontario and other provinces.

6 Common Challenges Faced by Immigrants

  1. Language Barrier
  2. Finding Employment
  3. Housing
  4. Cultural shock describes the feelings you experience after leaving your familiar, home culture to live in another cultural or social environment. For most newcomers it's difficult to deal with the cultural differences. ...
  5. Isolation
  6. The Weather

The services offered by local governments include education, health care, social services, law enforcement, sanitation, clean water, utilities, and parks and recreational services. Some of these programs rank higher in importance for immigrants than others. 

Community Resources Serving Immigrant and Refugee Families

In many communities, local agencies help immigrant and refugee families adapt to life in Canada. This list will help health professionals become familiar with services in their province/territory or region.

http://www.kidsnewtocanada.ca/beyond/resources<

For a list of French services, visit the French side of our site<

Ontario government resources

·        Ontario Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration<: Information on finding a home or child care<registering children in school< health care and social services, <filling out forms and access interpretation services.

Settlement.org< provides newcomers to Ontario with information about language programs, housing, health, education, recreation and more. Services such as crisis lines, community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

health centres and settlement services can be sorted by region<.

InMyLanguage.org< provides Ontario residents with information in 11 languages. Resources cover a wide range of topics including health, education, legal matters and daily life.

Welcome to Ontario kiosks provide basic information on settlement services including employment, education and other resources available to support newcomers. Currently there are 51 kiosks< situated across Ontario.

Chinese Family Services of Ontario< is a non-profit, accredited professional counselling, family services and settlement agency with a focus on Chinese Canadians.

NewYouth.ca<: Articles and videos aimed at newcomer youth. Links to services and programs, and listings of events for newcomer youth.

 

Count Me In – Tools for an Inclusive Ontario

This resource, developed by the Ontario Prevention Clearinghouse, is a publication that provides great insight and information relating to understanding inclusion and the realities facing many of the communities and clients

This term is used here to refer to the service-users that organizations work for and with and provide services to. We have chosen to use clients because of its common currency and ease of use, while acknowledging that it may unintentionally connote a particular ideology of patronage or a purely financial transactional relationships between organizations and the people they serve.

in Ontario. Although this publication focuses on the emergence of a holistic approach to building healthy communities in Canada, it provides agencies with important insights and various factors to consider when formulating an engagement/inclusive strategy to effectively reach and serve the needs of communities. It begins by exploring the idea of inclusion from a holistic perspective as a starting point for agencies (p 11-12). Many sample worksheets and templates are provided so agencies can apply the learned information and examine their agency’s methods of inclusion and outreach to communities and clients.

Ontario Prevention Clearinghouse. (March 2005). Count Me In – Tools for an Inclusive Ontario. 1-57. Toronto, Canada.

 

COVID-19 Having ‘significant impacts’ on Canadian...

COVID-19 having ‘significant impacts’ on Canadian immigration system

 

The COVID-19 pandemic< is having “significant impacts” on the federal government’s ability to process immigration and temporary work or study permits.

Most of Canada’s immigration processing depends on pen-and-paper forms or in-person interviews, and the pandemic has significantly hampered both according to Immigration, Refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

and Citizenship Canada.

According to the document, the department’s aging IT services will not be able to adapt to the more rapid pace of applications after the COVID crisis subsides.

Determinants of Mental Health for Newcomer Youth: Policy...

 

This resource, developed by a consortium of researcher from non-profits and academic institutions, draws upon information gathered from a study of newcomer youth from four various communities in Toronto and how their experience have implications for agencies providing services to newcomer youth in Canada. Beginning by offering statistics of the number of youth settling in Canada (p 1), the article provides statistical analysis of the data and examines the unique settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

related stressors experienced by newcomer youth (p 2). It also examines the implications of institutionalized and systemicRelating to the system. discrimination on youth (p 3) but also the types of networks utilized by youth to cope with settling in Canada (p 4). This information can be valuable for agencies looking to better reach out to youth and ensure that they can benefit from the services and programs being provided.

Shakya, Y; Khanlou, N; Gonsalves, T. (2008). Determinants of Mental Health for Newcomer Youth: Policy and Service Implications. 1-5. Toronto, Canada.

 

Developing a Workplace Anti-harassment Policy

Developing a Workplace Anti-harassment Policy

This resource produced by the Canadian Human Rights Commission can be used as a template to create your own organizations anti-harassment policy.

Canadian Human Rights Commission 

Family Law Issues for Immigrant, Refugee and Non-Status...

Family Law Issues for Immigrant, Refugee and Non-Status

Refers to immigrants and refugees who for one reason or another have less than full residence status in Canada. People living with less than full status include individuals who are refugee claimants waiting for a decision, rejected claimants, approved convention refugees who did not apply for permanent residence within 180 days, people who overstayed their visas, those who experience sponsorship breakdown while their application for permanent residence is in process, as well as people who entered Canada undetected. This is distinct from the concept of status as it is applied to aboriginal and First Nations people.

Women

In this article you will learn how to inform your clients

This term is used here to refer to the service-users that organizations work for and with and provide services to. We have chosen to use clients because of its common currency and ease of use, while acknowledging that it may unintentionally connote a particular ideology of patronage or a purely financial transactional relationships between organizations and the people they serve.

with on Canada fmily court system.

Family breakdown is a difficult and stressful time. If you or your partner came to Canada from another country, you may face both family law and immigration challenges when your relationship ends. For example, you will likely have to decide about financial support, make arrangements about your children and divide your family property. If you are not a Canadian citizen, your immigration status may be connected to your partner or other family member. You may worry about:

  • whether you can stay in Canada;
  • whether you will be separated from your children;
  • how to support yourself if you were sponsored by your partner and you leave the relationship.

Rights in Family Court

Immigrant, refugee and non-status women have the same rights and responsibilities as Canadian-born women under family law. When you separate from your partner, you can go to Court to apply for child custody or access, child support, spousal support, and you can ask the Court to award you a share in your family property. You can go to Family Court no matter what your immigration status is.

Growing Gap: Immigrants, Racialized Residents in the 2016...

Immigrant and Refugee Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

Services

Ontario continues to see a decline in the share of new immigrant arrivals to Canada despite receiving the highest overall number of immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

of any province or territory. The decrease in numbers is cause for concern for Ontario’s immigrant and refugee serving sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

since it will likely result in less federal settlement funding for Ontario region.

The federal government is the biggest funder of immigrant and refugee settlement services. The federal funding formula is based on a rolling average of three years of immigrant arrivals by province/territory. Ontario receives the highest number of immigrants from all provinces and territories. But the decline in Ontario immigrant arrivals, a trend that began in 2001, resulted in significant cuts to federal settlement funding to the province in 2011 and in later years. The Ontario immigrant and refugee-serving sector saw a significant loss of services and programs, job loss, and in some cases the closing of immigrant-serving organizations. Last year, Ontario faced a cut in its funding allocation which was mitigated by the allocation of additional funding for refugee resettlement. At the same time, demand for settlement services increased with the arrival of over 11,000 Syrian and other refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

in the province.

OCASI urges the federal government to review the funding allocation model to ensure funding stability for the sector, thus assuring stability of programs and services and reducing precarious work in the sector.

The data shows that recent immigrants were 3.5% of the total population in Canada in 2016, while 21.9% reported an immigrant background. In Ontario, recent immigrants were approximately 3.6% of the population, while 29.1% reported an immigrant background.

This website provides a sample of a highly developed performance management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

system - from the University of California, at Berkeley. This site offers guidelines, sample policies, forms, templates and tips on areas of performance management that go beyond the basics - such as management development guiding principles

Accepted bases of action or conduct. For the Organizational Standards Initiative, our guiding principles provide a value‐laden foundation on which our work can be based.

, tips for both staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

and supervisors/managers in conducting effective performance appraisals, and a chapter on building better communications.

Homelessness and Shelters: Best, Promising and Emerging...

Best, Promising and Emerging Practices

 

Given the growing interest in developing solutions to homelessness, it is increasingly important to know what workswhy it works and for whom it works. There is extensive research that examines causes and current conditions of homelessness but little –although growing—literature that can describe effective interventions in a practical way. The sharing of solutions is key to avoid “reinventing the wheel” in each community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

. While there are few “one-size-fits-all” solutions to homelessness, with the right tools and information communities could learn from each other and adapt initiatives to local contexts.

Yet, many communities and service providers in the non-profit sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

lack effective tools, resources and capacity to engage in rigorous program evaluation or to disseminate knowledge learned in order to assist service providers and program planners elsewhere. Sharing best, promising or emerging practices is about communication and alerting those working in the field to a strategy that demonstrates positive results.

In “What Works and for Whom<”, the Canadian Homelessness Research Network defines and explains the differences between best, promising and emerging practices as follows:

 

1.       BEST PRACTICE

2.       PROMISING PRACTICE

3.       EMERGING PRACTICE

HUMAN RIGHTS LEGAL SUPPORT CENTRE

Human Rights Legal Support Centre In this document you will learn where and how to file a complaint
  • What happened after a complaint is filed
  • How to prepare for mediation
  • How to prepare for a hearing
  • What happened after a hearing

 

Immigrants' Perspectives: Statistics Canada Survey

Immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

’ perspectives on their first four years in Canada: Highlights from three waves of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada

This article by Statistics Canada is broken down into 3 sections:

Section one: Perspectives on life in Canada

Section two: Difficulties encountered

Section three: Assessment of life in Canada

Introduction

The experiences of immigrants during the settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

process can be examined from a number of different perspectives. Over the past 15 years, settlement in Canada has most often been examined in terms of immigrants’ labour market and financial experiences. Among the topics investigated are the earnings trajectories of immigrants after arrival, the economic returns to their foreign credentials and experience, their ability to find employment in their area of specialization, and their incidence of low income.

In spite of these challenges, most of the new immigrants who remain in Canada for four years are positive about their decision to come here. Most consistently say they would make the same decision to come here again and the majority has already initiated the process to become Canadian citizens. Furthermore, about two-thirds of them feel that their expectations of life in Canada have been exceeded, met or improved upon. That being said, the outlooks of new immigrants who have not made material gains while in Canada express less positive views. These individuals are more likely than others to feel their expectations about life in Canada have not been met and that coming here was not the right decision.

https://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-008-x/2007000/9627-eng.htm#6<

Infection Prevention and Control (IPAC) – Online Learning

Infection Prevention and Control (IPAC) – Online Learning

Looking to build or expand your knowledge in IPAC best practices

Best Practices / Good Practices / Promising Practices

Ways of working that are acknowledged as effective and deserving of emulation.

? Check out our courses on IPAC core competenciesA set of knowledge, skills and abilities required to perform a job. and reprocessing, as well as specialized knowledge for different environments, including hospitals, community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

health care settings and long-term care homes.

Public Health Ontario has developed four new modules for the IPAC Core Competencies online course:

  • Personal Risk Assessment in Acute Care
  • Personal Risk Assessment in Long-term Care
  • Personal Risk Assessment in Community-Clinic
  • Personal Risk Assessment in Community-Home

Despite a recent recovery in the pace of immigration, the bank expects to see only 70 per cent of the originally targeted 341,000 new permanent residents at the end of the year, a decline of about 100,000 people.

Looking After Our Mental Health

Looking After Our Mental Health

As countries introduce measures to restrict movement as part of efforts to reduce the number of people infected with COVID-19, more and more of us are making huge changes to our daily routines.

The new realities of working from home, temporary unemployment, home-schooling of children, and lack of physical contact with other family members, friends and colleagues take time to get used to. Adapting to lifestyle changes such as these, and managing the fear of contracting the virus and worry about people close to us who are particularly vulnerable, are challenging for all of us. They can be particularly difficult for people with mental health conditions.

Fortunately, there are lots of things that we can do to look after our own mental health and to help others who may need some extra support and care.

Here are tips and advice that we hope you will find useful.

Mental Health Guide for Settlement Services Providers

OCASI’S MENTAL HEALTH PROMOTION GUIDE FOR AGENCIES SERVING IMMIGRANTS

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

AND REFUGEES

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

IN ONTARIO

This guide aims to improve the capacity of immigrant and refugee serving agencies to promote the mental health of newcomers

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

in general, but particularly that of their refugee clients

This term is used here to refer to the service-users that organizations work for and with and provide services to. We have chosen to use clients because of its common currency and ease of use, while acknowledging that it may unintentionally connote a particular ideology of patronage or a purely financial transactional relationships between organizations and the people they serve.

.

While several agencies have developed their own internal tools and policies to promote mental health while responding to related challenges among their clients, many have not. This document provides crucial guidelines for such agencies to adapt in ways that addresses their own needs, clients, and services while taking into account the resources to which they have access.

·       Mental Health Promotion Guide< for Agencies Serving Immigrants and Refugees in Ontario

·       Mental Health Promotion Guidelines< for Agencies Serving Immigrants and Refugees in Ontario

·       Mental Health Promotion Guidelines for Frontline Workers< at Agencies Serving Immigrants and Refugees in Ontario

 

For managers and executive directors interested in learning how to apply the guidelines, please refer to the following webinar, facilitated by Across Boundaries, on Leading the Way in Mental Health Promotion for Refugees and Newcomers<.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

If you would like to learn more about supporting clients as they navigate the healthcare system, including mental healthcare, please refer to the following webinars, facilitated by Crossroads Clinic at Women’s College Hospital and funded by IRCC:

·       Navigating the Ontario Healthcare System Part I<

·       Navigating the Ontario Healthcare System Part II<

·       The Mental Health Project was funded by the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration, OCASI’s Mental Health Project (2016-2017) was aimed at enhancing the capacity of front- line workers and immigrant and refugee serving agencies in Ontario to respond to the mental health and trauma needs of refugee clients.

Modernizing Settlement Powerpoint Presentation

This workshop provided by CIC details the new Modernized Approach to Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

Service Delivery. The presentation explains this outcome based approach through a sample logic model

A visual representation or work plan of how your program works. It lists what you put into your program (resources), what you do (activities), and what you plan to achieve (outputs and outcomes).

and its corresponding detailed explanation of each part. Furthermore, CIC explains how an organization can be eligible for funding using this approach. 

National Settlement Sector Community of Practice (CoP)

National Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

Sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

of Practice (CoP)

This project aims to develop and facilitate a collection of communities of practice (CoPs) where staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

and leaders in the Canadian immigrant and refugee serving sector, and those in related fields, can learn, share, connect and collaborate.

The intent is for these CoPs to drive connections that lead to a more enhanced and consistent service standard. Supporting these is SettleNet.org, a bilingual online platform developed to be a unique digital “hub” for those serving newcomers

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

directly or indirectly across the country.

THE PLATFORM

The platform SettleNet.org< and Réseau-Etab.org< in French came online in the spring of 2019.

SettleNet.org is a free, national service where users can immediately access resources and discussions that enhance their work expertise. Users are able to create and share knowledge and experiences, regardless of where they are in the country.

To make this possible, the platform offers various features such as:

  • A professional development

    All types of facilitated learning opportunities that aim to increase a person’s skills or knowledge, leading to personal development and career advancement. Learning opportunities may include courses, workshops, coaching, etc and may be specific to the present demands on an organization’s staff or leadership, or may be more broadly relevant to a person’s career goals.

    guide/space:
     users can explore, improve and learn to assess their skills and qualifications by participating in and promoting courses, webinars and events.
  • A networking space: users can connect by promoting their work, participating in discussions, joining diverse groups, interacting with other users, learning more about other organizations, and sharing stories that strengthen the sector.
  • A library of resources: users can access and add to a wide range of best practices

    Best Practices / Good Practices / Promising Practices

    Ways of working that are acknowledged as effective and deserving of emulation.

    materials, guides and forms, handbooks and tools.

SettleNet.org is still in its open beta phase. The project team invites people in the sector and related fields across Canada to get involved by using the platform and providing feedback on how it can be made more useful for them and their work.

 Go to SettleNet.org<

Notice of Intent to Appear

If you intend to appear in court and plead not guilty, you or your representative must attend in person only at the court office shown on the back of your ticket within the times and days shown to file Notice of Intention to Appear (NIA) within 15 days of receiving an offence.

OCASI General Interview Questions

These are general Interview questions used by OCASI to recruit for any position. OCASI usually add more questions to customize it; making it relevant to the position. This is just sharing, and OCASI is not asking you to adopt it in any way.

Outreach And Access to Services Mental health

Outreach And Access to Services Mental health

This article speaks of mental health and homelessness, and how good outreach links people experiencing homelessness to resources and services they want and need. 

Outreach is the first step in developing relationships with the most disenfranchised people in Canada. It links people experiencing homelessness to resources and services they want and need. The goal of outreach is to provide the spark for the journey back to a vital and dignified life as part of the community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

. Core outreach services include engagement, information and referral and direct services. But even the best outreach efforts cannot be successful without following through and offering proper programs and services. 

Research raises concerns about the lack of access to necessary programs and services, long waiting times and the lack of specialized care for a variety of different conditions and target groups. People are often strong supporters of the programs they do access but express concerns abort how difficult it is to access care when it is needed, particularly in rural areas. Canadians express a need for better transitions and coordination across the range of services they require as well as better planning when discharged from formal facilities. 

There is always a need for better access to and a larger number of healthcare services for people experiencing mental illness. People experiencing mental illness need more services in hospitals, more beds in acute care hospitals and provincial facilities, more community based programs and services, more supports for people to be independent and employed in their communities, more outreach, outpatient and rehabilitation programs, more awareness programs, more housing with supports for people with mental illness, more coordination of services, more support for families, more crisis intervention and more mental healthcare providers.

Permanent Resident Program

Immigration, Refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

, and Citizenship Canada facilitates the entry of permanent residents in a way that maximizes their economic, social, and cultural contribution to Canada. There are residency requirements and obligations to obtain and maintain permanent resident status.

You will learn about the following:

1.Economic classes

Instructions for processing applications submitted under economic classes, for which applicants are selected on the basis of their ability to become economically established in Canada<

2.Non-economic classes

Instructions for processing permanent residence applications submitted under family-related and humanitarian classes, for which applicants are selected on the basis of family-reunification, social, and humanitarian objectives<

3.Permanent resident card and status

The permanent resident card (PR card)< is the official proof of permanent resident status in Canada.

See also:

Protect Yourself and Others From The Spread COVID-19

Protect Yourself and Others From The Spread COVID-19

  • You can reduce your chances of being infected or spreading COVID-19 by taking some simple Avoid going to crowded places. Why? Where people come together in crowds, you are more likely to come into close contact with someone that has COIVD-19 and it is more difficult to maintain physical distance of 1 metre (3 feet).
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. Why? Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and infect you.
  • Make sure you, and the people around you, follow good respiratory hygiene. This means covering your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then dispose of the used tissue immediately and wash your hands. Why? Droplets spread virus. By following good respiratory hygiene, you protect the people around you from viruses such as cold, flu and COVID-19.
  • Stay home and self-isolate even with minor symptoms such as cough, headache, mild fever, until you recover. Have someone bring you supplies. If you need to leave your house, wear a mask to avoid infecting others. Why? Avoiding contact with others will protect them from possible COVID-19 and other viruses.

Racialized Communities

Racialized Communities Recent immigrants (many of whom are from racialized communities) have been experiencing declining earnings and employment outcomes, despite educational credentials that have been higher on average than those of native-born Canadians. This suggests that the real problem is not their skill level, but the extent to which these skills are not accepted and effectively utilized in the Canadian workplace.

Recruiting, Retaining and Rewarding Volunteers: What...

This resource, developed by the Canadian Centre for Philanthropy, is a report in which volunteers offer their opinions and advice on how non-profit organizations can better recruit and support volunteers and volunteer positions. It begins by listing the various types fo support that organizations should offer volunteers (p 3-4), while highlighting how organizations hinder the success of volunteers. This report also provides practical information to develop enhanced volunteer recruitment strategies (p 5) and shedding light on the value of staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

and social support to different types of volunteers, including: seniors, youth, and professionals (p 6).

 

Phillips, S; Little, B; Goodine, L. (2002). Recruiting, Retaining and Rewarding Volunteers: What Volunteers Have to Say. 1-8. Toronto, Canada.

Refugees and Asylum

Refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

and Asylum

In this section, you will learn about applying for refugee status from within Canada, find out how to come to Canada as a refugee, sponsor a refugee or find refugee services in Canada.

 

Refugees and Asylum

In this section you will learn about applying for refugee status from within Canada, find out how to come to Canada as a refugee, sponsor a refugee or find refugee services in Canada.

  • How Canada’s refugee system works
  • Irregular border crossings and asylum in Canada
  • Claim refugee protection from inside Canada
  • Refugees from outside Canada  Helping Syrian refugees
  • Appeal a refugee claim
  • Who can sponsor refugees
  • Key figures on asylum claims

Refugees with disabilities Global Impact on Migration

Research Protocol Template

The Research that our organizations conducts or particiapates in is relevant and beneficial to the work we do and the communities we serve. A sample protocol is attached to assist you in doing a research.

Responding to Trauma: Crisis Intervention

Responding to Trauma: Crisis Intervention Models

In this article, we will look at the basis of crisis intervention, and the 7 principles

Accepted bases of action or conduct. For the Organizational Standards Initiative, our guiding principles provide a value‐laden foundation on which our work can be based.

that we should abide by when using these techniques.  W will look at Advocating for Those in Times of Need.

As we know, crisis intervention provides help for individuals or groups during a period of extreme distress. The intervention is temporary, active and supportive. Crisis intervention is most frequently provided by firefighters, police officers, emergency medical or search and rescue personnel, nurses, physicians and other hospital workers, communications personnel and community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

members.

Crisis is a state of emotional turmoil or an acute emotional reaction to a powerful stimulus or demand, trauma expert Jeffrey Mitchell< explains. There are three characteristics of crisis:

  1. The usual balance between thinking and emotions is disturbed.
  2. The usual coping mechanisms fail.
  3. Evidence of impairment in an individual or group.

Crises may occur when individuals face actual or threatened death, serious injury or some other threat to their physical integrity, according to the International Journal of Emergency Mental Health<. Individuals may also be victimized by witnessing these events occurring to others. Contradictions to some deeply held beliefs can cause crises.

Crisis intervention provides help for individuals or groups during a period of extreme distress. The intervention is temporary, active and supportive. Crisis intervention is most frequently provided by firefighters, police officers, emergency medical or search and rescue personnel, nurses, physicians and other hospital workers, communications personnel and community members.

Basics of Crisis Intervention

Three goals guide techniques used in crisis intervention:

  1. Mitigate impact of event.
  2. Facilitate normal recovery processes.
  3. Restore adaptive function.

Crisis intervention techniques should also abide by the following seven principles:

  1. Simplicity: In a crisis, people respond best to simple procedures. Simple things have the best chance of having a positive effect.
  2. Brevity: Psychological first aid needs to remain short, from minutes up to one hour in most cases.
  3. Innovation: Use creativity; specific instructions do not exist for every case or circumstance.
  4. Pragmatism: Keep it practical; impractical suggestions can cause the person to feel more frustrated and out of control.
  5. Proximity: Provide support services close to the person’s normal area of function. “The most important thing about proximity is that support must be given in a safe zone,” according to the book Prehospital Behavioral Emergencies and Crisis Response.
  6. Immediacy: Provide services right away. Crises demand rapid interaction, and delays can undermine the effectiveness of support services.
  7. Expectancy: Work to set up expectations of a reasonable positive outcome. The person or group in crisis should be encouraged to recognize that help is present, there is hope and the situation is manageable. It may be appropriate to tell the person or group that although the situation is overwhelming right now, most people can and do recover from crisis experiences.

 

 

Sexual Harassment Policy

This sample policy outlines employees’ responsibilities in ensuring that a workplace is free from sexual harassment. This sample policy could be a starting point for any organization to develop their own anti-sexual harassment policy in their organization. 

Sexual Harassment Policy Can Save Employers Money

This resource aims to educate employer on the ramifications of incidences of sexual harassment in the workplace. It stipulates that sexual harassment in the workplace are both tangible and non-tangible and occurrence of sexual harassment in the workplace have potential cost associated, which may include staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

taking off sick time, low morale and productivity, absenteeism, high turnover and damages in the event of a successful complaint.    Giesbrecht T and Foster K Sexual Harassment Policy Can Save Employers Money  

The Facts about Gender-Based Violence

The Facts about Gender-Based Violence

At the Canadian Women’s Foundation, our vision is for all women in Canada to live free from violence.

Women in Canada live at greater risk than men of domestic violence, sexual assault and harassment, and sex trafficking.

Why is it urgent to address gender-based violence?

  • Because it costs women their lives: approximately every six days, a woman in Canada is killed by her intimate partner.
  • Violence against women costs taxpayers and the government billions of dollars every year: Canadians collectively spend $7.4 billion to deal with the aftermath of spousal violence alone.
  • It has a profound effect on children: Children who witness violence in the home have twice the rate of psychiatric disorders as children from non-violent homes.

There are many forms of gender-based violence. While this page focuses on domestic violence against women, there is more information in:

Frequently Asked Questions about Gender-Based Violence

The Facts about Online Hate and Cyberviolence Against Women...

The Facts about Online Hate and Cyberviolence Against Women and Girls in Canada

Online hate and cyberviolence have emerged as extensions of violence against women. These issues are rooted in gender inequality.

While people of all genders experience cyberviolence, women and girls are at greater risk of experiencing violence online, especially severe types of harassment and sexualized abuse. In 2009, 67% of the victims of police-reported intimidation on the Internet were women and girls. 

International data is similar. 73% of women are abused online worldwide, according to the UN Broadband Commission’s 2015 report. More than half (52%) of the women polled disagree with this statement: “The Internet is a safe place to express my opinions”

Frequently Asked Questions about Online Hate and Cyberviolence

  1. Why is it urgent to address online hate and cyberviolence targeted at women and girls? <
  2. What can you do about online hate and cyberviolence?<
  3. Is there government policy and legislation to deter online hate and cyberviolence?<

 If you observe someone experiencing online hate and/or cyberviolence:

  • Practice safe online intervention. If you see someone being attacked on social media, send them a private message to ask how they are doing and to find out if they need assistance.
  •  Report online abuse or harmful content. You can report harassment and harmful content about someone to appropriate social media platforms and take steps to block the persons responsible.
  • Talk about online harassment. Discuss online abuse with everyone you know and share information about it with your online communities.

The Facts About Sexual Assault and Harrassment

The Facts About Sexual Assault and Harassment

Note that the answers to Frequently Asked Questions About Sexual Assault and Harassment can be found at https://canadianwomen.org/the-facts/sexual-assault-harassment/<

Sexual assault and harassment are persistent forms of gender-based violence that are rooted in gender inequality.

In fact, sexual assault is the only violent crime in Canada that is not declining. Its impact goes far beyond survivors

(Of mental health, addictions) Springing out of community resistance to labels of mental illness and addiction, ‘survivors’ is an alternative, self-definition highlighting survival of treatment systems and institutions, as well as the importance of rights protection, advocacy, and self-determination. Mental health advocates also use the term ‘consumers’ in reference to people who are currently using treatment systems.

; dealing with the aftermath of sexual assault costs Canadians billions of dollars every year.

Since the vast majority of sexual assault isn’t reported to police, both police-reported data and self-reported data from social surveys help to establish its scope.

This fact page answers some frequently asked questions about sexual assault and harassment in Canada. For more information about other forms of gender-based violence, consult:

Frequently Asked Questions About Sexual Assault and Harassment

The Regularization of Non-Status Immigrants in Canada 1960-...

This resource, developed by OCASI’s STATUS Campaign, collates the findings of a collaborative research project led by a team of university researchers and community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

organizations in Toronto with the intent to better understand the past and present needs and histories of regularization programs for non-status

Refers to immigrants and refugees who for one reason or another have less than full residence status in Canada. People living with less than full status include individuals who are refugee claimants waiting for a decision, rejected claimants, approved convention refugees who did not apply for permanent residence within 180 days, people who overstayed their visas, those who experience sponsorship breakdown while their application for permanent residence is in process, as well as people who entered Canada undetected. This is distinct from the concept of status as it is applied to aboriginal and First Nations people.

immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

in Canada. This body of research begins by highlighting how regularization programs have illustrating that although regularization programs are often introduced as more restrictive immigration procedures and policies were introduced into law (p 7-8). Apart from exposing numerous barriers that these individuals face in terms of restricted access to services and resources, this resource also shares the advocacy work and campaigning done by other non-profits to shed light on this issue (p 35). Numerous ideas and additional resources are provided for Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

agencies so they can also become more involved in addressing and illuminating some of the systemicRelating to the system. and structural barriers faced by non-status immigrants and refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

(p 45-49).

Khandor, E; McDonald, J; Nyers, P; Wright, C. (November 2004). The Regularization of Non-Status Immigrants in Canada 1960-2004: Past Policies, Current Perspectives, Active Campaigns. 1-49. 

The Role of A Settlement Worker & Job Requirements

Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

Work

Settlement workers are usually the first connection to life in Canada. A Settlement Worker supports immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

and refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

in schools, libraries, at an organization (or it's local hub). 

The organization responsible for the service must:

  1. Train the staff

    For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

    and program managers
  2. Develop capacity
  3. Plan for longterm sustainabilty
  4. Manage organizational risks 
  5. Demonstrate strengths and accountablility to funders

 

Job Description has two primary components:

 

1. Individual Service to Newcomer Clients

This term is used here to refer to the service-users that organizations work for and with and provide services to. We have chosen to use clients because of its common currency and ease of use, while acknowledging that it may unintentionally connote a particular ideology of patronage or a purely financial transactional relationships between organizations and the people they serve.

<

2. Group Service to Newcomer Clients

 

The Duties involved:

1. Individual Service to Newcomer Clients:

  • Coordinates information, activities and linkages with other staff/programs as assigned.
  • Distributes identified promotional material about the services for newcomers

    In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

    to each
  • newcomer client
  • Meets with clients to assess their settlement strengths and needs
  • Assists clients to prioritize their settlement needs and facilitates referrals to the closest and
  • most appropriate community

    The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

    services
  • Provides services in a supportive and culturally sensitive manner
  • Distributes generic promotional materials identified by IRCC
  • Facilitate client assess to service by telephoning for appointments, translation documents,
  • Assisting clients to fill out forms, write correspondence, etc.,
  • Advocate on behalf of clients with institutions, employers, landlords etc.,
  • Provide support for school enrolment for all newcomer family members as necessary
  • Assist newcomers to understand their rights and responsibilities as new Canadians
  • Identify and bring forward for discussion/resolution, any challenge barrier or gaps in service for clientele.

 

2. Group Service to Newcomer Clients:

  • Coordinates information, activities and linkages with other staff/programs as assigned.
  • In co-ordination with the other Settlement Counsellor, plan and coordinate settlement related activities and programs for groups of newcomer clients
  • Involves resource people from the workplace. and other community services in these programs
  • Provide workshops and information sessions on pertinent issues

Work with other Staff:

  • Negotiates a protocol for program partners to identify newcomer clients and refer them to the Settlement Counsellor.
  • Facilitates constructive and culturally sensitive communication between program staff and eligible clients
  • Informs administration and colleagues about emerging settlement related issues, including a profile of the community.
  • Collect newcomer client feedback (e.g. surveys, workshop evaluations, user needs assessment, etc.) to track outcomes of settlement services.
  • Works with a team of professionals to ensure that the clients needs are met
  • Works flexible hours, including evening and weekends, according to peak user times, as schedules.

Administration:

  • Maintains updated supply of handouts on services, resources and policies that are relevant eligible clients Ensures client confidentiality Represents agency on assigned committees
  • Enters statistical information in a newcomer data system using a IRCC and/or approved tracking form
  • Prepare and submit reports, statistics, etc.,
  • Make on going site visits and establishes networks with other settlement counselors, other community groups including faith organizations, businesses, community centres, schools, day cares, etc, in the city/country.
  • Attends training opportunities
  • Keep accurate and up-to-date files on clients
  • Works flexible hours, including evening and weekends, according to peak user times, as schedules

 

Toolkit on Effective Mentoring for Newcomer Youth Facing...

This is an good resource to assist service providers when mentoring newcomer and refugee youth http://ontariomentoringcoalition.ca/mentoringyouthfacingbarriers/tailored-mentoring-for-youth-with-specific-needs/newcomer-youth/<

Key Lessons

  • Developing and planning a mentoring program for newcomer youth should include:
    • Consulting with the community

      The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

      through an advisory committee or needs assessment process;
    • Understanding the particular challenges related to the community’s transition to their new country;
    • Hiring staff

      For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

      from the community or those who have a strong understanding of the community;
    •  Reviewing program materials regularly to ensure cultural appropriateness; and Supporting past mentees in
  • Programs should include family members in mentoring as much as possible to help the youth balance learning about their new culture and maintaining previous cultural values

    Values are ideals, standards, or qualities considered worthwhile or desirable. See also “principles,” which are often shaped by values.

    and norms.3, 4
  • Mentors should receive training in various community-specific issues, such as the immigration process (and its challenges), trauma (mental and physical issues), and cultural competency.
  • Body map:

What is sexual Harassment?

This document provides definitions and terms and identifies inappropriate acts, gestures and attitudes that may result in sexual harassment in the workplace. 

Workplace Violence and Harassment Understanding the Law

This guide explains what every worker, supervisor and contractor needs to know about workplace violence and workplace harassment requirements in the Occupational Health and Safety Act. It describes everyone’s rights and responsibilities and answers, in plain language, the questions that are most commonly asked about these requirements. 

Strengthening Communities

A Guide to Measuring Advocacy and Policy

As more non-profits engaged in advocacy and policy work to address public issues and effect social change, there is a growing desire to gauge the impact of investments in this area. How to evaluate the effectiveness of advocacy and policy work is an emerging question of interest within the philanthropic and non-profit audiences. Answering that question, however, has proven difficult because relatively few instructive resources exist to help those who wish to measure progress in this area.  The guide is presented in two main sections: Section 1 is an overview of the context for measurement of advocacy and policy work, including the inherent evaluation challenges (pg. 6). Section 2 presents a menu of outcome categories which describe changes that may result from advocacy and policy work and discusses evaluation design issues that relate to outcome selection. This section also outlines several factors that influence the selection of an appropriate evaluation design and provides both a case example and examples of data collection tools (pg. 11).

Community Revitalization

 

This resource, developed as a written component of a Ph.D. general examination, explores and compares the use of an asset-based approach to community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

organizing with the use of an asset-based approach to community development in relation to community revitalization.  Inherent in community development are the issues of scale, control, and disorganization, which are explored in greater detail (pp. 4-7). Ideas and strategies are also provided for organizations looking to strengthen and support community organizing through the use of an asset-based approach to community development (pp. 11-13), which can be incorporated into project evaluation frameworks and monitoring.

Pinkett, R. (21 March, 2000). Community Revitalization. 1-17. Boston, United States. 

 

Developing 4-H Needs Assessment through ‘Focus Group’...

 

 

This resource, developed by the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, uses a case study to illustrate how focus groups can be advantageous for organizations to use as environmental scans and also to conduct needs assessments for the community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

. The document outlines strategies for screening and selecting applicants, including a sample telephone screening questionnaire (p 7). This document also provides strategies for setting up a meeting room that is encourages active participation among participants and the importance of establishing the right atmosphere (pp. 9-10). Lastly, a sample exit survey for those participating in the focus is included that can be easily modified to suit the theme or subject matter of a session of a non-profit organization (pp. 21-23).

Barker, W. (2010). Developing 4-H Needs Assessment through ‘Focus Group’ Interviewing. 1-25. Reno, Nevada, United States. 

 


 

Facilitated Discussions: A Volunteer Management Workbook

This resource, developed by Volunteer Canada, serves as a workbook for agencies that seek processes and established practices for organizing and leading facilitated discussion sessions with volunteers and participants from the community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

. These sessions are important for non-profits as they can serve as platforms for discussion related to issues within the community, outreach, and even program evaluation (through comments and feedback). Among the numerous templates and checklists offered, a generic template for hosting facilitated discussions is provided (p 13) that stresses the importance of including priority setting activities and theming processes. The core steps to the best practices

Best Practices / Good Practices / Promising Practices

Ways of working that are acknowledged as effective and deserving of emulation.

of facilitation (p 22-23) also serve as a useful guide for those leading the session and guiding participants through activities. Lastly, information related to record keeping (p 25) and communicating the results to stakeholders (p 28) is included so agencies can effectively track, monitor, and utilize the information captured.

Weaver, L. (2011). Facilitated Discussions: A Volunteer Management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

Workbook. 1-35. Ottawa, Canada.  

 

 

Grant Writing Toolkit: The Program Plan

 

This resource, developed by the United Way of Central New Mexico, is a guide that is intended to assist agencies in proposal writing and securing funds for programs and project initiatives. The resource opens by stating that grant writing, along with securing funding, also ‘provides a vehicle for [an] organization to educate funders about key community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

needs’ (p 2). Apart from providing an overview of common grant proposal components (pp. 2-3), it provides a series of important questions for Executive Directors and Managers to consider when writing grant proposals, including questions related to need, the program in questions, budget, outcome, capacity, and future sustainability (pp. 4-5). A series of additional grant-writing electronic tools are included at the end of the resource for further reading (p 7).

Tamm, J; Nephesh, T. (14 July, 2010). Grant Writing Toolkit: The Program Plan. 1-7. Albuquerque, United States.

 

 

Harm Reduction - Homelessness

Harm Reduction - Homelessness

This article talks about why Harm Reduction is important

 

There is considerable evidence for the effectiveness< of harm reduction<. There is also growing acceptance of harm reduction as an important tool and strategy for working with youth experiencing homelessness (or those at risk) who are struggling with addictions. Vancouver’s In-site program, a safe injection site, is one of the most extensively researched addictions programs in the country, and the evidence of effectiveness< is very compelling. Studies have identified that In-site doesn’t promote< or lead to increased use or crime<. Rather, it has had the impact of reducing HIV risk behaviours<, improving public order< and has led many participants to addictions treatment<.   

Policy and practice should follow from good evidence. Many communities in Canada have emerged as strong leaders in harm reduction, yet our misunderstanding, fear and prejudice often get in the way of wider adoption. 

How to Conduct a Needs Assessment for Your Nonprofit Program

needs assessment is an important part of nonprofit program planning. If you’re thinking of starting a new program, for example, a needs assessment to determine whether the program is necessary should be the first step you take.

A needs assessment is more or less a research project. You don’t necessarily need to hold to the strict requirements of scientific inquiry, but just as you do when collecting information to help guide organizational planning, you should do everything possible to ensure that the information is accurate and free of bias.

Some people say they don’t want to share an idea with others because they’re afraid someone may steal it. Although you can’t rule out the chances of this happening, it’s a rare occurrence. In almost all cases, being open about your plans is a good idea.

Inclusion Research Handbook - Ontario Women's Health...

 

This handbook, developed by Ontario Women’s Health Network, is intended to provide details of the history and development of Inclusion Research and also to agencies with a how-to guide on conducting Inclusion Research. This document begins by defining Inclusion Research (p 11) and also outlining the general and specific benefits of Inclusion Research for non-profit agencies, ranging from strengthening relationships with stakeholders and providing marginalized communities with a sense of ownership on issues and priorities to increasing transparency and accountability to support effective programs and services to meet the complex needs of communities (p 16). Included in this document is a sample agenda session for agencies to utilize when meeting with those that are the subjects of the research (p 46) and also a variety of checklists and templates that agencies will use when conducting Inclusion Research. Among these templates and checklists are: an accessibility

The degree to which organizations and their services can be accessed by as many diverse people as possible. Whether something is accessible can depend, for example, on service design, organizational climate and culture, physical structures. Accessibility is related to the concept of ‘barriers,’ which are practices, structures, attitudes, and other things that block access. See also the definition of anti-oppression.

checklist (p 112), a sample matrix sheet for selecting committee members (p 118) and even a sample interview form (p 127-130).

Ontario Women’s Health Network. (2009). Inclusion Research Handbook. 1-204. Toronto, Canada.

 

Indigenous Peoples and Homelessness

Urban Indigenous Peoples and Homelessness

Urban Indigenous Peoples experience homelessness at a disproportionate rate and make up a significant percentage of the homeless populations in cities. According to Patrick (2014) “Some sources have suggested that Indigenous homelessness in major urban areas< ranges from 20-50% of the total homeless population<, while others have reported that the range may be much wider – from 11 to 96%.<” In fact, research by Belanger et al< (2013) found that 1 in 15 Indigenous People in urban centres are homeless compared to 1 in 128 for the general population. This means that Urban Indigenous Peoples are 8 times more likely to experience homelessness.

Indigenous Peoples is a collective term to encompass the diversity of cultures within First Nations, Inuit and Métis experiences. First Nations refers to persons who identify as such and who may or may not be federally registered under that title in the Indian Act. According to the Assembly of First Nations, the First Nations population represents over 50 distinct nations and language groups and is made up of 634 First Nations communities (or ‘reserves’). Inuit people are descended from the ancient Thule people, and have occupied parts of Canada’s northernmost regions thousands of years before European arrival. Métis people are descendants of mixed Indigenous and European ancestry have their own culture, language (Michif), traditional homeland (the Métis Nation Homeland includes Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, parts of Ontario, British Columbia, the Northwest Territories and the Northern United States) and a sense of nationhood.    

 

Indigenous Peoples and Human Rights In Canada

Indigenous Peoples and human rights

For many decades, First Nations people were not provided with full access to human rights protection – due in part to section 67 of the Canadian Human Rights Act. The legislation was finally repealed in 2008; this means that First Nations individuals can now make complaints of discrimination to the Canadian Human Rights Commission.

On this page:

Life Skills Training - Homelessness

Life Skills Training – Homelessness

Helping those experiencing homelessness acquire life skills can help them move on from homelessness and resettle into the community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

. Life skills training is different from support, help or assistance in that the aim is to promote self-sufficiency. 

Life skills are the skills that many people take for granted, like managing money, shopping, cooking, running a home and maintaining social networks. They are essential for living independently. Some  people experiencing homelessness do not have all of these skills, either because they never acquired them or because they lost them through extended periods of homelessness. Helping those experiencing homelessness acquire life skills can help them move on from homelessness and resettle into the community. Life skills training is different from support, help or assistance in that the aim is to promote self-sufficiency. 

Life Skills Training - Homelessness

Life Skills Training – Homelessness

Helping those experiencing homelessness acquire life skills can help them move on from homelessness and resettle into the community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

. Life skills training is different from support, help or assistance in that the aim is to promote self-sufficiency. 

Life skills are the skills that many people take for granted, like managing money, shopping, cooking, running a home and maintaining social networks. They are essential for living independently. Some  people experiencing homelessness do not have all of these skills, either because they never acquired them or because they lost them through extended periods of homelessness. Helping those experiencing homelessness acquire life skills can help them move on from homelessness and resettle into the community. Life skills training is different from support, help or assistance in that the aim is to promote self-sufficiency. 

Mapping Change: Using a Theory of Change to Guide Planning...

This guide examines the concept of 'Theory of Change', which is offered as a process which establishes a blueprint of a roadmap for the work and anticipates its likely effects and outcomes (p 1). Theory of change is distinguished from a logic model

A visual representation or work plan of how your program works. It lists what you put into your program (resources), what you do (activities), and what you plan to achieve (outputs and outcomes).

in that a theory of change takes a much wider view of desired change and identifies preconditions that will enable and even inhibit eac possible step (p. 3). The guide also includes three important, overarching evaluation questions useful for agencies to rely upon as well as particular indicators

Evidence or measures that show that a certain condition exists or certain results have or have not been achieved. They tell you how much progress has been made toward the intended goals, objectives, outputs or outcomes. Here, indicators are the practical and measurable markers that monitor specific aspects of a standard. Meeting certain indicators means the achievement of some level of the standard.

to note (p. 5). Lastly, a useful flow chart is included which enables agencies to map the information presented in a logical sequence that can be consulted and developed at all stages of a project (p. 8).

Mackinnon, A; Amott, N; Mcgarvey, G. (2006). Mapping Change: Using a Theory of Theory of Change to Guide Planning and Evaluation.  GrantCraft. 1-12. New York City, United States.

Ontario Population Projections Update: 2010-2036 Ontario...

This resource, released by the Government of Ontario, provides updated population projections for each region in Ontario from the base year of 2010. This report highlights notable trends in immigration and emigration as well as demographic shifts including age and sex, that will influence the demands for services and programs and the changing needs of Ontarians. One of the highlights is the increase in the number of senior citizens, which is expected to rise to make up 13.9% of the population (p 4). Of particular interest are the figures projecting immigration trends to Ontario (22-23) as well as the projected increase of non-permanent residents in Ontario (p 24-35). Statistical tables and a glossary of terms is also included as appendices to the document.

 

Government of Ontario. (Spring 2011). Ontario Population Projections Update: 2010-2036 Ontario and Its 49 Census Divisions. 1-96. Toronto, Canada.

 

Project Evaluation Guide for Non-Profit Organizations

 

This guide developed by Imagine Canada is designed to assist charitable and non-profit organizations to conduct precise and appropriate project evaluations, and then communicate and use the results of evaluation effectively. Its primary focus is to help organizations that would like to perform project evaluations by using their internal resources, and to make evaluation a part of their project management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

and strategic development.

Imagine Canada 2006 Project Evaluation Guide for Non-Profit Organizations

Project Evaluation Guide For Nonprofit Organizations:...

 

This guide book, developed by Imagine Canada, is designed to allow agencies the opportunity to conduct precise project evaluations and also communicate the results of the evaluations to stakeholders. The guide book is divided into four training modules in which each section contains important information related to the process of project evaluation. Aside from the information offered in the guide book, several ready to use templates and checklists have been included so that agencies can adapt and use them accordingly. Of particular interest is an evaluation tools checklist (p 14), a sample activity tracking log (p 30), and the necessary contents of an evaluation report (p 50).

Zarinpoush, F (Imagine Canada). (2006). Project Evaluation Guide For Nonprofit Organizations: Fundamental Methods and Steps for Conducting Project Evaluation. 1-89. Toronto, Canada.

 

 

Proposal Writing - RFP

A Project Proposal is a document which you present to potential sponsors to receive funding or get your project approved.

http://project-proposal.casual.pm/#about-proposal

Project Proposals contain key information about your project. They are essential for your sponsors since they’ll use them to evaluate your project and determine whether or not they’ll allocate funds for it.Despite the fact that many different formats are available, roughly 80-90% of all Project Proposals follow a similar template. They mostly all have the same structure which contains a few key points.

If you are familiar with proposals please scroll to the templates< and samples<. If you’re not, please take a look at the About Project Proposals<Video Guides< and Further Reading< sections to find out more information.

We have compiled a few templates< in this toolkit to help you chose the most appropriate one for your business. For instance, you’ll find templates and generic business proposals, as well as NGO, grant, university and freelance project proposals.

Managing Volunteers & Students

Advancing Together the Roles of the Nonprofit Board in...

This resource developed by First Non-profit Foundation. It states that strategic alliances can improve organizations’ ability to advance the mission and serve their customers - by achieving a scale that increases the availability or types of programming and by making a deeper impact through the capabilities of several partners. Successful strategic alliances strengthen organizational capacityA multi‐faceted concept referring broadly to an organization’s power, strength, and ability to grow, develop, and accomplish its goals. Elements of capacity can include knowledge, people and resources. and quality, expand knowledge and connections, and enhance effectiveness through collaborative leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

, combined staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

and volunteers, joint fundraising, and shared technology and facilities.
 
Revised, by Emil Angelica and Linda Hoskins and Gary J. Stern (2011) Advancing Together the Roles of the Non-profit BoardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization. in Successful Strategic Alliances, First Non-profit Foundation

Facilitator Guide to Encourage Newcomer Voluntarism

 

This resource, developed by the Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

(OCASI), is designed to provide resources for staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

members who work with newcomers

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

in order to introduce immigrants to volunteer and civic engagement opportunities with the purpose of fostering greater community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

engagement and participation in an agency’s programming. While the guide begins exploring the aspects of community engagement and the various levels of participation (pp. 8-9), it also notes numerous barriers to engagement that communities and groups face (pp. 11-12). In the appendices, a sample volunteer workshop template, sample questionnaires, and group discussion questions are available for organizations (pp. 31-46).

Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants. (February 2008). Facilitator Guide to Encourage Newcomer Voluntarism. 1-55. Toronto, Canada.

 

Board structure & operations

Anti-Oppression Practice for Community Groups

This document developed by Centre for community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

organizations came out of workshops that conducted 2012-2013. The goal of this document is to help start dialogue on how to build organizations and workplaces where all experiences and voices are welcome, valued and fully able to participate. It is not meant to be a comprehensive list of strategies, or a "quick fix"- rather, it provides ideas regarding challenges to implementing Anti-Oppressive practices within organizations, as well as Strategies and Solutions to make organizations more open to fostering equality and diversity.

Centre for Community Organizations (2013) Anti-Oppression

Used as an umbrella term that includes activities, practices, policies, ways of thinking, and initiatives that address oppression in all its forms (e.g. racism, homophobia, classism, ablism). Key to anti-oppression is an understanding that inequality and oppression exist in the world, and that all of us participate in unequal power dynamics in a variety of ways. Anti-oppression involves reflection and making choices about how to give, share, wield, or withhold power to assist and act in solidarity with people who are marginalized. Anti-oppression is sometimes used with the terms equity and accessibility: Anti-oppression is a broader term that includes a commitment to equity and accessibility. See both equity and accessibility.

Practice for Community Groups

Work Environment

Anti-Racism Policy Implementation Plan - OCASI

An old sample anti-racism policy implementation plan from OCASI. It covers implementation within various levels of the organization. This document can be modified for use within other organizations and adapted into an anti-oppression

Used as an umbrella term that includes activities, practices, policies, ways of thinking, and initiatives that address oppression in all its forms (e.g. racism, homophobia, classism, ablism). Key to anti-oppression is an understanding that inequality and oppression exist in the world, and that all of us participate in unequal power dynamics in a variety of ways. Anti-oppression involves reflection and making choices about how to give, share, wield, or withhold power to assist and act in solidarity with people who are marginalized. Anti-oppression is sometimes used with the terms equity and accessibility: Anti-oppression is a broader term that includes a commitment to equity and accessibility. See both equity and accessibility.

plan.

This online tutorial video provides individuals with information pertaining to creating accessible PDF documents along with several follow-up tutorials. One should be aware of formatting and the sequencing of information that is presented in a PDF document. Bookmarks and articles to assist in organizing information for the reader as well as the use of semantic tags. The author also states that all images should be accompanied by text, but if the description of an image exceeds 255 words an appendix should be added at the end of the document. Attention to detail including the use of clear, legible font and the use of colour and patterns to accompany information (i.e. tables and graphs) can ensure a document is more accessible as well. Benbow, Timothy. (April 2011). Eight Essentials for Creating Accessible PDF Documents. University of California Fullerton. 15:13. Retrieved from YouTube.
Operations

Change Management Best Practices Guide

 

This Change Management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

Best Practices

Best Practices / Good Practices / Promising Practices

Ways of working that are acknowledged as effective and deserving of emulation.

Guide is designed to give general guidance to public sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

bodies undertaking change. It is not intended to be prescriptive nor exhaustive. It is not intended to be prescriptive nor exhaustive. A 'one-size-fits-all' approach to managing change is ineffective, as each public sector organisation is different, with its own structure, history, culture and needs, and each change event is different. The characteristics of each change (type, breadth, size, origin etc.) also influence the way change is planned and effectively managed.

Change Management Best Practices Guide.  The Queensland Government Chief Information Office: Retrieval date March 26, 2014

Learning & Innovation
Abstract retrieved from YoutubeWe are all constantly selling - ourselves, our ideas, our recommendations and our organizations - to colleagues, bosses, direct reports, clients, politicians, bureaucrats, strategic partners, corporate sponsors and donors. This presentation provides you with a number of innovative ways to become more influential.Chamandy, I; Aber, K. (April 21, 2011). Five Good Ideas about "Branding - Why Choose You?". Maytree Foundation. 31:10. Retrieved from Youtube. 
Governance & Strategic Leadership

How and when to write policies and procedures

This resource is designed to help you identify when you ought to have a written policy or procedure, thereby reducing the risk of manuals so large as to be useless. It will to reduce the time commitment associated with the writing of policies and procedures, through the provision of frameworks and samples for the writing and you will be provided with a structure for reviewing your policies and procedures.]

 

D, Maree. (1999) How and when to write policies and procedures Second Edition published by ACROD Queensland Division 

Integrated Anti-Oppression framework for Reviewing and...

This resource was developed by Spring Tide. It aims to help organization review their current policy using an Anti- oppression

The systemic mistreatment of one group of people by another group of people between whom there is an imbalance of institutional power. Mistreatment can include psychological, physical and verbal forms of abuse and subjugation; it can be subtle and need not be intentional. Examples include racism, sexism, ableism, heterosexism, classism, and so on.

framework. This toolkit is full ideas of what organizations can do to challenge social inequality (pg. 2) Barriers and challenges to integrated ant-oppression (pg. 6) Applying anti-oppression

Used as an umbrella term that includes activities, practices, policies, ways of thinking, and initiatives that address oppression in all its forms (e.g. racism, homophobia, classism, ablism). Key to anti-oppression is an understanding that inequality and oppression exist in the world, and that all of us participate in unequal power dynamics in a variety of ways. Anti-oppression involves reflection and making choices about how to give, share, wield, or withhold power to assist and act in solidarity with people who are marginalized. Anti-oppression is sometimes used with the terms equity and accessibility: Anti-oppression is a broader term that includes a commitment to equity and accessibility. See both equity and accessibility.

to policies (pg. 9) setting up a policy review committee and accessing the accessible of your  policies and work sheets (pg. 15-40)

Alexander, M, (2008) An Integrated Anti-Oppression framework for Reviewing and Developing Policy. Springtide Resources. 

The number of mergers involving non-profit organizations is increasing. So, too, is the need for concise, practical information to guide non-profit leaders through the merger process. This resource provides you information about non-profit mergers.  Different Perspectives of Merger (pg. 1) topics includes-Merger Process Overview and Context, Mergers and Other Types of Strategic, Alliances- Strategic Planning

An activity carried out on a regular basis to clarify an organization’s purpose, goals, priorities, and a plan for reaching those goals and addressing the priorities.

(pg. 11)
Environmental Assessment, Organizational Assessment, Forces Driving Strategic Alliance, Formation Partner Selection (pg. 19) Criteria for Selecting a Merger Partner, Creation of a Joint Feasibility Task Force, Building Trust with a Potential,  Partner, Due Diligence Defined (pg. 49), Defined Professional Assistance in Conducting, Due Diligence, Good Faith Assumptions, Managing the Unexpected and The Value of Due Diligence.  
 
Published in 2001 in the United States of America by the Mandel Center for Non-profit Organizations
Human Resources

Human Resources Tools: Leadership and Building Your Team

The need for effective leaders in the cultural sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

is enormous, not just to ensure the success of their organizations but also to promote and act as spokespersons for their community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

. This is particularly important for increasing community interest and involvement in the arts, as well as for commitment and financial support from private and public sector sponsors.

Human Resources Tools: Tips on Leading and Contributing to...

Human Resources Tools: Tips on Leading and Contributing to Meetings

As managers, you’re always busy planning, preparing for and running meetings with your own staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

, with other members of the organization or the sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

, or simply contributing to other people’s meetings. This guide looks at your role as a meeting leader and as a meeting participant. It examines how to plan and conduct meetings effectively: defining your desired outcome, preparing for the meeting, making discussions constructive, handling interruptions and conflict, and generating ideas.

Cultural Career Council Ontario (N.D.) Tips on Leading and Contributing to Meetings Retrieval Date, May 15, 2014 

Sexual Harassment Policy - COSTI

This sample Sexual Harassment policy was developed by COSTI. It covers implementation principles

Accepted bases of action or conduct. For the Organizational Standards Initiative, our guiding principles provide a value‐laden foundation on which our work can be based.

, fundamental principles, and definitions of sexual harassment in the workplace and complaints procedures. This document can be modified for use within other organizations and adapted into an anti-oppression

Used as an umbrella term that includes activities, practices, policies, ways of thinking, and initiatives that address oppression in all its forms (e.g. racism, homophobia, classism, ablism). Key to anti-oppression is an understanding that inequality and oppression exist in the world, and that all of us participate in unequal power dynamics in a variety of ways. Anti-oppression involves reflection and making choices about how to give, share, wield, or withhold power to assist and act in solidarity with people who are marginalized. Anti-oppression is sometimes used with the terms equity and accessibility: Anti-oppression is a broader term that includes a commitment to equity and accessibility. See both equity and accessibility.

plan.

Hiring, Deployment, Engagement & Retention

Integrating Evaluative Capacity into Organizational...

This resource was developed by The Bruner Foundation. It aims to help organizations build evaluative capacity—the capacity to do evaluation, to commission evaluation, and to think evaluatively.

Anita M. Baker and Beth Bruner (2010) Integrating Evaluative Capacity into Organizational Practice

Physical & Technological Infrastructure

Nonprofits and Social Media: It Ain’t Optional

This resource, developed by Ventureneer and Caliber, provides agencies with useful information concerning the importance of utilizing social media to support organizational and program growth and also by offering several strategies for effectively integrating social media at the organizational level. The resource begins by citing 10 highly successful social media habits that have been adopted by non-profit organizations (pp. 2-4). It then continues by offering agencies with a number of guidelines and frameworks that may be adopted by organizations when initiating or adopting social media complete with case studies as examples (pp. 55-13). The guide even examines a Twitter tweet and illustrates the various components of a tweet as an example (p 6) and even offers some useful metrics available for organizations to measure their return on investment in social media

Ventureneer: Caliber. (October 4, 2010). Nonprofits and Social Media: It Ain’t Optional. 1-40. New York City, United States. 

Board roles & responsibilities

Where, Oh Where, Did Our Membership Go?

This resource, developed by the Alberta Culture and Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

Spirit Department of the Government of Alberta, examines strategies of membership retention as well as attracting new members for non-profit organizations. First and foremost, it is important for each organization to establish the raison d’être for membership and the rationale for membership relations (p 2). The guide also provides some useful strategies for establishing goals related to membership engagement and retention (p 4) and even techniques for recruiting strategic organizations as members (5). Such techniques include training and information sessions, networking, and using the correct recruitment tools that will compel agencies to join as a member (p. 5).

Alberta Culture and Community Spirit, Government of Alberta. (2009). Where, Oh Where, Did Our Membership Go? 1-6. Edmonton, Canada.