A Community Based Approach

This category focuses on how your organization engages with the communities and clients you serve. The standards in this category deal with three main areas: approaches to service delivery that helps to strengthen communities, addressing systemic issues of equity and accessibility, and working collaboratively with partners, other agencies and across sectors. Listed below are the various standards within the main areas of A Community Based Approach. For a more in-depth overview of this category we encourage you to listen to the short video on the right side of the page.

Trends & Issues: Professional Development in the Nonprofit Sector.

Professional development

All types of facilitated learning opportunities that aim to increase a person’s skills or knowledge, leading to personal development and career advancement. Learning opportunities may include courses, workshops, coaching, etc and may be specific to the present demands on an organization’s staff or leadership, or may be more broadly relevant to a person’s career goals.

in the nonprofit sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

is a vital tool for strengthening organizational effect­iveness in the face of continuous change. It stands against a backdrop in which community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

needs are many, resources are few and both funding and policy parameters are continuously in flux. At the same time, the field of professional development is itself evolving to meet the challenges of satisfying current training needs, responding to emerging ones and developing cost-effective options for how, when and what training is delivered. Is the level of demand for training.

Guide for Writing Proposals

Sample Outline

The following is a sample outline for a project proposal. Note that all questions for a section may not apply to your proposal, and should be used as a general guide only.

1.     Introduction (1 or 2 paragraphs)

2.      Motivation (1 to 3 paragraphs)

3.       Project Summary (1 paragraph)

4.       Project Details

5.       Conclusion (1 paragraph)

6.       Conclusion (1 paragraph)

Strategies for Effective Proposal Writing

Strategies for Effective Proposal Writing

Readiness is an important element of a successful proposal. Funders will want to know if you are an accountable organization. The following chart will help you self-assess your strengths and weaknesses by taking a look at the “workings” of your organization. z Why does your organization exist? z Who implements your goals and objectives? (the “work”) z How do you do it? are you a formal or informal organization? do you work well with others? do you leverage small successes into bigger ones (i.e. dollars, partnerships, timing)?

Once you are satisfied that you are indeed ready to develop your proposal and are targeting the appropriate funder, it is time to put pen to paper.

Attribution. (Ontario Healthy Communities Coalition)

Diversity at Work

Diversity at Work

Creating an inclusive and supportive work environment

Once an organization has successfully modified their recruitment and hiring practices to reach a more diverse audience, the next step is to successfully engage and support them as employees.

Visit the following HR Toolkit sections for information on HR practices that support an organization’s ability to engage and retain diverse teams. These practices are not exclusive to diversity and inclusion efforts but are considered particularly important to the successful engagement and retention of diverse talent.

Orientation< 
Employee engagement and retention< 
Performance management< 
Flexible work arrangements< 
Interpersonal communication< 
Learning & development<

Moving From Diversity to Inclusion

Moving From Diversity to Inclusion<

Do you know what you need to create an action plan for shifting from diversity management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

to inclusion?

As a start, a common definition of “diversity” and “inclusion” is needed. Diversity means all the ways we differ. Some of these differences we are born with and cannot change. Anything that makes us unique is part of this definition of diversity. Inclusion involves bringing together and harnessing these diverse forces and resources, in a way that is beneficial. Inclusion puts the concept and practice of diversity into action by creating an environment of involvement, respect, and connection—where the richness of ideas, backgrounds, and perspectives are harnessed to create business value. Organizations need both diversity and inclusion to be successful.

From Diversity to Inclusion

Move from compliance to diversity as a business strategy

The world has become highly diverse, but many companies have not—especially when it comes to combining diversity with the inclusive culture needed to truly drive value.

WRITTEN BY

·         Many organizations promote diversity while struggling to fully leverage the business benefits of a diverse workforce.

·         Nearly one-third of respondents to the Human Capital Trends global survey say they are unprepared in this area, while only 20 percent claim to be fully “ready.”

·         In a recent study, 61 percent of employees report they are “covering” on some personal dimension (appearance, affiliation, advocacy, association)1< to assimilate in their organization.2<

·         Leading companies are working to build not just a diverse workforce, but inclusive workplaces, enabling them to transform diversity programs from a compliance obligation to a business strategy.

Community Learning Needs Assessment: Toolkit

This toolkit is designed to support Alberta’s Comprehensive Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

Institutions (CCIs), Community Adult Learning Councils (CALCs), community literacy providers, and other employment and training providers to assess adult learning needs through coordinated activities at the local level. The toolkit provides step-by-step instructions, tips, and sample tools to help CCIs and community partners ensure that educational programs and services are responsive to local learning and labour market needs. 

1. Demonstrating Value

What is Demonstrating Value?

Demonstrating Value offers a simple process and helpful resources to enable you to use information and data more effectively to run your organization, plan for the future and show your value to the community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

. It was designed by community for community.

Building a Culture of Evaluation

30 Ideas to Apply to Your Organization

This infographic from Vancouver-based Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

Solutions provides 30 tips to build your organization’s evaluation capacity.

Sexual Harassment Policy - COSTI

This sample Sexual Harassment policy was developed by COSTI. It covers implementation principles

Accepted bases of action or conduct. For the Organizational Standards Initiative, our guiding principles provide a value‐laden foundation on which our work can be based.

, fundamental principles, and definitions of sexual harassment in the workplace and complaints procedures. This document can be modified for use within other organizations and adapted into an anti-oppression

Used as an umbrella term that includes activities, practices, policies, ways of thinking, and initiatives that address oppression in all its forms (e.g. racism, homophobia, classism, ablism). Key to anti-oppression is an understanding that inequality and oppression exist in the world, and that all of us participate in unequal power dynamics in a variety of ways. Anti-oppression involves reflection and making choices about how to give, share, wield, or withhold power to assist and act in solidarity with people who are marginalized. Anti-oppression is sometimes used with the terms equity and accessibility: Anti-oppression is a broader term that includes a commitment to equity and accessibility. See both equity and accessibility.

plan.

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