A Community Based Approach

This category focuses on how your organization engages with the communities and clients you serve. The standards in this category deal with three main areas: approaches to service delivery that helps to strengthen communities, addressing systemic issues of equity and accessibility, and working collaboratively with partners, other agencies and across sectors. Listed below are the various standards within the main areas of A Community Based Approach. For a more in-depth overview of this category we encourage you to listen to the short video on the right side of the page.

Immigrant, Refugee & Settlement Hub

Immigrant, Refugee & Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

Hub

The Immigrant, Refugee and Settlement (IRS) hub – The Hub@791 – is a newly coordinated suite of programs and services to support the social, civic and economic integration of newcomers

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

to Canada.

IRS programs operate like a “hub,” delivering a hybrid model of classroom and online learning, as well as itinerant programs and services to meet the needs of immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

and refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

in the various communities within the Greater Toronto Area (GTA).

Community-Based Mental Health

Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

-Based Mental Health

To meet the needs of people experiencing homelessness that also experience mental health problems a number of community mental health services are required: 

Housing services:

Different types of subsidized and supported housing such as group homes, shared accommodation and apartments. Housing workers visit sites regularly offering counseling and holding tenants' meetings. Some agencies work with individuals to find appropriate housing in the private sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

. Some agencies provide 'safe houses,' which provide short-term accommodation for people in crisis, designed to prevent hospitalization. 

Employment services:

Agencies partner with local businesses to find jobs for people with a mental illness. Staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

may also provide skills teaching and job coaching

In the context of supervision of staff, coaching means the provision of ongoing and regular support: directing and offering feedback to staff to set and pursue goals, developing their capacity, addressing performance issues, and ensuring staff are equipped to excel. Modeling and demonstration of behaviours and tasks can be key aspects of coaching.

CAMH and Sketch help keep recently-housed youth permanently off the streets<

Child Youth and Family Programs

Child, Youth And Family Programs

It is estimated that approximately 20% of those experiencing homelessness are between the ages of 13 and 24.<

One of the solutions for helping youth experiencing homelessness make healthy transitions to adulthood by avoiding life on the street is strengthening families and addressing their needs. There are a number of programs available to familes, youth and children experiencing homelessness (or at risk of homelessness). A Way Home Canada< features key examples of youth services, including:

·         School-based interventions<

·         Family reconnection<

·         Support for LGBTQ2S Youth<

·         Support for youth transitioning from care<

·         Employment, training and education<

·         Youth transitional housing< and Housing First<

With quality programming and appropriate prevention strategies and solutions to homelessness, we can ensure that 

Case Management -Homelessness

Case Management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

- Homelessness

This document talks about reducing the risk of homelessness.

Case management refers to a collaborative and planned approach to ensuring that a person who experiences homelessness gets the services and supports they need to move forward with their lives. Originating from the mental health and addictions sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

, case management can be used more broadly to support anyone experiencing homelessness. It is a comprehensive and strategic form of service provision whereby a case worker assesses the needs of the client (and potentially their family) and, where appropriate, arranges, coordinates and advocates for delivery and access to a range of programs and services designed to meet the individual’s needs.

A client-centered case management approach ensures that the person who has experienced homelessness has a major say in identifying goals and service needs, and that there is shared accountability. The goal of case management is to empower people, draw on their strengths and capabilities, and promote an improved quality of life by facilitating timely access to the necessary supports, thus reducing the risk of homelessness and/or enhancing housing stability. 

In reviewing case management as a key component to ending homelessness, Milaney< identified it as a strengths-based team approach with six key dimensions:

  1. Collaboration and cooperation – a true team approach, involving several people with different backgrounds, skills and areas of expertise;
  2. Right matching of services – person-centered and based on the complexity of need;
  3. Contextual case management – Interventions must appropriately take account of age, ability, culture, gender and sexual orientation. In addition, an understanding of broader structural factors and personal history (of violence, sexual abuse or assault, for instance) must underline strategies and mode of engagement;
  4. The right kind of engagement – Building a strong relationship based on respectful encounters, openness, listening skills, non-judgmental attitudes and advocacy;
  5. Coordinated and well-managed system – Integrating the intervention into the broader system of care; and
  6. Evaluation for success – The ongoing and consistent assessment of case managed supports.

There are a number of useful resources to help service providers deliver case management in the homelessness sector. The Calgary Homeless Foundation has developed a report called “Dimensions of Promising Practice for Case Managed Supports in Ending Homelessness”<. In Australia, the government has a dedicated website< with a large number of resources for doing case management with people who have experienced homelessness. Finally, the National Alliance to End Homelessness also has a number of resources <dedicated to this topic.

Mental Issues Working through It Part 3

Mental Issues Working Through It Part 3 Education for Leaders using 'Working through It'

A framework for a 3-hour session with supervisors, managers and executives using Working Through It.

SUMMARY: One inexpensive way to increase mental health awareness is to use the free resource Working Through It. What follows is an outline of a session you can facilitate for your leaders, including supervisors, managers, union representatives and executives. This will better prepare them to support employees with mental health issues.

Suggested three-hour awareness session for leaders

The following framework can be modified to meet your timing needs and group size.

10 MINUTES

Introduction of the topic

Explain why this is an issue – turnover, absenteeism, disabilityWhile disability is commonly understood as a restriction or lack of ability to perform an activity beyond the range of what is considered “normal”, disability rights activists challenge this definition. Instead, disability is a normal aspect of life. In fact, most people will experience some form of disability, either permanent or temporary, over the course of their lives. Rather than viewing the condition of the person as the source of the problem, an anti-oppression approach acknowledges that it is social discrimination and physical and institutional barriers that are the greatest challenge for those with disabilities., conflict, performance problems, human rights complaints, duty to accommodate, grievances, etc.

Share senior management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

's support for the strategy of addressing mental health issues.

Be explicit that this is part of a wider strategy that includes education, training,changes in processes and procedures, development of resources, and measurement of effectiveness.

Discuss how participants will be recognized for their efforts to support positive workplace mental health and why this matters to them.

10 MINUTES

Identification of issues

  • Hold an open discussion about what supervisors see that may indicate an employee has a mental health concern. You are looking for examples of behaviours rather than symptoms.
  • Ask what makes these behaviours challenging for leaders.
  • Record the answers to use in a follow-up meeting to brainstorm solutions.

 

60 MINUTES

Viewing the first half of the video

Before viewing, ask participants to write down the following discussion points:

  • Information learned about mental illness 
    ("aha" moments or "I did not know that!")
  • Questions that arose
  • One "test the team" question to ask the group

They will be engaging in discussion about these points half way through watching the video.

If you are viewing online, go to http://www.workplacestrategiesformentalhealth.com/wti/WatchAllPage.aspx<

Pause at the end of Dr. Anthony Levitt talking about "Concerns with Medication" and before Gord Conley talks about "My Experience in a Treatment Centre" (approximately 60 minutes).

15 MINUTES

Facilitate discussion about the three points.

BREAK – 10 MINUTES

50 MINUTES

Resume video and ask participants to continue thinking about the discussion points.

20 MINUTES

Facilitate discussion from second half of the video using the discussion points.

5 MINUTES

Wrap up: Ask participants what they will do differently as a result of what they have learned.

Consider assigning the first episode on Managing Mental Health Matters< as a next step in leader education.

To learn more about facilitating Managing Mental Health Matters, see the Managing Mental Health Matters Leader's Guide<.

Mental Issues Working Through It Part 2

Mental Issue:  Working through It Part 2

Referring Individuals<

Suggested wording so you can sensitively recommend Working Through It to an employee who appears to be struggling with a mental health concern. 

SUMMARY: When employees are struggling with mental health issues, you may be concerned about invading privacy or being seen as harassing. Working Through It is a resource that provides employees with practical strategies for personal coping strategies at work, off work and returning to work. Below are tactful suggestions for referring your employees to this resource.

Making the referral

Working Through It speaks directly to people struggling with mental health issues through videos and related resources. Review this resource yourself to make it easier to recommend it to your employees.

Every situation is unique depending upon your history with the employee, the nature of your relationship, and current circumstances. Here are a few ways of referring employees to Working Through It that you may want to adapt for your own use.

Mental health issues

"Sometimes things can seem overwhelming. There is a resource that includes videos of people who have gone through tough times at work, talking about how they coped, and what they did to get back to a place of wellness. I can send you the link to Working Through It if you want to see if any of their strategies might be useful for you."

DisabilityWhile disability is commonly understood as a restriction or lack of ability to perform an activity beyond the range of what is considered “normal”, disability rights activists challenge this definition. Instead, disability is a normal aspect of life. In fact, most people will experience some form of disability, either permanent or temporary, over the course of their lives. Rather than viewing the condition of the person as the source of the problem, an anti-oppression approach acknowledges that it is social discrimination and physical and institutional barriers that are the greatest challenge for those with disabilities. leave

"It can be hard to navigate the disability system, especially when you are not feeling well. I heard about a resource called Working Through It where someone from the insurance industry talks about how to get help filling out the paperwork, how to respond to the letters and how to make things happen more smoothly. Do you want me to send you the link?"

Returning to work

"Before you return to work, you may want to hear about how some other people found a way to return successfully that was healthy for them. Working Through It includes their stories, and speaks about creating a plan that works for you, talking to co-workers, helping your supervisor help you and coping with any workplace stressors. Would you like me to send you the link?"

Co-worker issues

"It can be tough to work through these types of issues, and the impact on workplace relationships. There is a resource called Working Through It where they share approaches to dealing with gossip, conflict and other issues in the workplace. I can send you the link to it if you want to have a look."

Job insecurity

"I remember hearing people in one of the videos on Working Through It talk about how they dealt with the worry of losing their jobs. They share ideas for dealing with debt issues or replacing income when unemployed.

Working Through It is an initiative of Mental Health Works< and the Mood Disorders Association of Ontario<, funded through The Great-West Life Assurance Company's national corporate citizenship program in support of the Great-West Life Centre for Mental Health in the Workplace.

Mental Health Awareness: Working Through It.

On this website, you will find a variety of ways to assist yourself and your employees who are experiencing mental issues. Learn how employees managed their mental health at work and off work in Working Through It

Increase mental health awareness – for yourself, for your team and for your organization. These resources can help reduce stigma, increase wellness, and improve workplace psychological health and safety. Free resources, videos and strategies are provided.

 Individual Awareness<

If you are a manager or team leader, you may already be thinking about how you can increase mental health awareness with very little time or budget. How about having access to a sustainable, no-cost approach that is available to you every week?

Begin a Workplace Dialogue

To help make this even more effective, consider what's being discussed in each week's email and use it as an opportunity to open dialogue within your team.

The timing to get started using this resource is ideal. The National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace raises the urgency, as well as the responsibility, for employers and organizations to increase awareness about mental health and mental illness in the workplace.

Increasing Mental Health Awareness in 5 Minutes a Week

The Working Through It weekly emails will include links to a short video clip or a resource document that you can share with employees to inform and inspire them about taking charge of their mental health issues at work, off work and when returning to work.

 

The purpose of this service is to open dialogue, increase understanding and remove some of the stigma that surrounds mental health issues. Viewing the videos and resources will take, on average, less than five minutes of an employee's time each week. They are not intended to be sent to specific individuals, but rather to your entire team including, if possible and appropriate, any team members who are away from work on leave.

LGBTQ+ Guide to Online Safety

This guide was developed by VPN mentor. Whether you are part of the LGBTQ+ community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

or are an ally, we hope you find this guide helpful.

Worldwide survey conducted showed the challenges LGBTQ+ community faced online.

Here are some of our key findings:

·       73% of all respondents in all categories of gender identity and sexual orientation have been personally attacked or harassed online.

·       50% of all respondents in all categories of gender identity and sexual orientation have suffered sexual harassment online.

·       When it comes to sexual orientation, asexual people feel the least safe online, and gaySomeone who is attracted to and/or who has loving, romantic and/or sexual relationships primarily or exclusively with members of their own sex or gender. In certain contexts, this term is used to refer only to those who identify as men. Some may also prefer the term “queer” to describe themselves. men the safest.

·       When it comes to gender identity, transgender

This term has many definitions. It is frequently used as an umbrella term to refer to all people who deviate from their assigned gender or the binary gender system (of male and female), including intersex people, transsexuals, cross-dressers, transvestites, gender queers, drag kings, drag queens, two-spirit people, and others. Some transgendered people feel they exist not within one of the two standard gender categories, but rather somewhere between, beyond, or outside of those two genders. The term can also be applied exclusively to people who live primarily as the gender “opposite” to that which they are assigned at birth. These people may sometimes prefer the term “transsexual”. Some others may prefer not to identify as transgender or transsexual, but instead to identify as simply “men” or “women”. Transgender people may or may not want to change their bodies. Sometimes ‘transgender’ is shortened to “trans”.

women feel the least safe online, and cisgender men the safest.

·       Transgender women are the most likely to be outed against their will online, while cisgender men are least likely.

+For complete results, see the appendix.<

Organizational Capacity Assessment for Community-Based Organizations

Organizational CapacityA multi‐faceted concept referring broadly to an organization’s power, strength, and ability to grow, develop, and accomplish its goals. Elements of capacity can include knowledge, people and resources. Assessment for Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

-Based Organizations

The Organizational Capacity Assessment (OCA) is a structured tool for a facilitated self-assessment of an organization's capacity followed by action planning for capacity improvements. The OCA format helps the organization reflect on its processes and functions, and score itself against benchmarks. At the end of this assessment you will learn how to involve your staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

and boardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization. in your discussions as you question the mission, goals and programs of the organization.

Organizational Capacity Assessment for Community-Based Organizations Goal: The goal of this tool is to assist organizations in assessing the critical elements for effective organizational management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

, and identifying those areas that need strengthening or further development. Purpose: The OCA tool was designed to enable organizations to define a capacity-building improvement plan, based on self-assessed need. This Organizational Capacity Assessment (OCA) was initially designed to measure overall capacity of organizations funded by President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) under the New Partners Initiative (NPI). This OCA tool provides organizations with a set of criteria to assess their current management capacity to implement quality health programs, to identify key areas that need strengthening. Although many capacity assessments exist, the structure and process of this tool distinguishes it from others. Multi-level and multi-department involvement fosters team building and organizational learning. Inclusion of management, compliance, and program components ensure a holistic understanding of the organization’s strengths and challenges and the guided self-assessment by skilled facilitators instills ownership on the part of the organization for its improvement plan.

The OCA tool assesses technical capacity in seven domains, and each domain has a number of sub-areas.

OCA Domains:

1. GovernanceRefers to the source of strategic thinking and decisions that shape and direct an organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Includes anything related to non‐profit boards as well as strategic leadership issues.<

2. Administration

3. Human Resources

4. Financial Management

5. Organizational Management

6. Program Management

7. Project Performance Management

Evaluation Toolkit

 This Evaluation Tool Kit will help you with the following:

 Select an Evaluator

 Engage Stakeholders & Select a Team

 Develop Evaluation Questions

 Using a Logic Model

A visual representation or work plan of how your program works. It lists what you put into your program (resources), what you do (activities), and what you plan to achieve (outputs and outcomes).

<

 How to Create a Logic Model

 Choose an Evaluation Design

 Create a Strategy

 Create a Budget

 Resources & References

 

1. Selecting a Design

Before you decide on the most appropriate evaluation design, it is important that you are clear about the primary evaluation questions. Once you have defined the most important evaluation questions, there are several designs that may be able to adequately answer your evaluation question. You can select a specific design by considering the following:

 Which design will provide me with the information I want?

 How feasible is each option?

 How valid and reliable do my findings need to be?

 Are there any ethical concerns related to choosing a specific design?

 How much would each option cost?

 

2. Types of Research Designs

Below we describe four types of research designs that offer suitable options depending on your specific needs and research questions.

1. Pre-experimental designs

2. Experimental designs

3. Quasi-experimental designs

4. Ex post facto designs

 Posttest – A test administered after a specific treatment or intervention. A posttest can help determine how study participants have responded to a treatment or intervention.

 Randomization (random assignment) – The process of randomly placing study participants in a treatment or control/comparison group.

 

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