A Community Based Approach

This category focuses on how your organization engages with the communities and clients you serve. The standards in this category deal with three main areas: approaches to service delivery that helps to strengthen communities, addressing systemic issues of equity and accessibility, and working collaboratively with partners, other agencies and across sectors. Listed below are the various standards within the main areas of A Community Based Approach. For a more in-depth overview of this category we encourage you to listen to the short video on the right side of the page.

Evaluation Toolkit

 This Evaluation Tool Kit will help you with the following:

 Select an Evaluator

 Engage Stakeholders & Select a Team

 Develop Evaluation Questions

 Using a Logic Model

A visual representation or work plan of how your program works. It lists what you put into your program (resources), what you do (activities), and what you plan to achieve (outputs and outcomes).

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 How to Create a Logic Model

 Choose an Evaluation Design

 Create a Strategy

 Create a Budget

 Resources & References

 

1. Selecting a Design

Before you decide on the most appropriate evaluation design, it is important that you are clear about the primary evaluation questions. Once you have defined the most important evaluation questions, there are several designs that may be able to adequately answer your evaluation question. You can select a specific design by considering the following:

 Which design will provide me with the information I want?

 How feasible is each option?

 How valid and reliable do my findings need to be?

 Are there any ethical concerns related to choosing a specific design?

 How much would each option cost?

 

2. Types of Research Designs

Below we describe four types of research designs that offer suitable options depending on your specific needs and research questions.

1. Pre-experimental designs

2. Experimental designs

3. Quasi-experimental designs

4. Ex post facto designs

 Posttest – A test administered after a specific treatment or intervention. A posttest can help determine how study participants have responded to a treatment or intervention.

 Randomization (random assignment) – The process of randomly placing study participants in a treatment or control/comparison group.

 

Serving LGBTQ+ Newcomers

Positive Spaces Initiative (PSI)

The Positive Spaces Initiative (PSI)< aims to support the settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

to more effectively serve LGBTQ+ (lesbian

Women who have the potential to be attracted to and/or who have loving, romantic and/or sexual relationships primarily or exclusively with other women. Some women may also use the term “gay” or “queer” to describe themselves.

, gaySomeone who is attracted to and/or who has loving, romantic and/or sexual relationships primarily or exclusively with members of their own sex or gender. In certain contexts, this term is used to refer only to those who identify as men. Some may also prefer the term “queer” to describe themselves., bisexual

Someone who is attracted to and/or who has loving, romantic and/or sexual relationships with both men and women. Some people avoid this term because of its implication that there are only two sexes/genders to be attracted to, reinforcing the binary gender system (of male and female). Instead, they may use terms such as ‘queer’.

, trans, two-spirit, queer

Often used as an umbrella term encompassing lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, questioning people, transgender/transsexual people, and anyone else who does not identify strictly as heterosexual or conform to gender norms. Some people identify as queer to distance themselves from the rigid categorizations of “straight” and “gay”. Originally a derogatory word, it has now been reclaimed by some people and used as a statement of empowerment. Some others, however, reject the use of this term due to perceived connotations of deviance and its tendency to gloss over and sometimes deny the differences between these groups. In the past 10-20 years this term has gained wide usage, so it tends to be mostly younger people who use this term.

, questioning

A term used to describe someone who is exploring their sexual or gender identity. People’s identities grow and shift over a lifetime and a person may question their sexual orientation or gender identity at any point in their life. ‘Questioning’ is thus included in the umbrella term LGBTTIQQ2S to show that there is always a place for people who are questioning.

, intersex

Someone who is born with a body that is a combination of male and female elements.

, asexual, pansexual, genderqueer, etc.) newcomers

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

. PSI encourages training, education, leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

and resource-sharing to support LGBTQ+ newcomers, staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

, volunteers and community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

members.

LGBTQ+ individuals are an integral, though often invisible, part of immigrant and refugee communities. Immigrant and refugee serving organizations have an obligation and responsibility to provide relevant, effective and appropriate services for these immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

and refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

who are often marginalized within multiple communities.

PSI has been traveling throughout the province of Ontario to deliver free workshops to staff members, from front-line workers to senior management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

and boardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization. members, on how to create welcoming spaces in their agencies that are inclusive and free from discrimination based on sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression.

The Positive Spaces Initiative is funded by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC).

 

 Go to PositiveSpaces.ca<

 

Accessibility Planning in the Settlement Sector: Newcomers with Disabilities

OCASI Accessibility

The degree to which organizations and their services can be accessed by as many diverse people as possible. Whether something is accessible can depend, for example, on service design, organizational climate and culture, physical structures. Accessibility is related to the concept of ‘barriers,’ which are practices, structures, attitudes, and other things that block access. See also the definition of anti-oppression.

Program

ACCESSIBILITY INITIATIVE

Accessibility Planning in the Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

Sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

: Newcomers

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

with Disabilities

Project Summary

OCASI's Accessibility Initiative (AI) allows settlement sector employees to acquire new skills and knowledge in areas related to service provision to immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

with disabilities. Through this initiative, settlement sector employees learn more about immigrants with disabilities and their diversities; gain a greater understanding of the different legislations that exist internationally, nationally, provincially/territorially as it relates to the rights of people with disabilities; examine the relationship between disabilityWhile disability is commonly understood as a restriction or lack of ability to perform an activity beyond the range of what is considered “normal”, disability rights activists challenge this definition. Instead, disability is a normal aspect of life. In fact, most people will experience some form of disability, either permanent or temporary, over the course of their lives. Rather than viewing the condition of the person as the source of the problem, an anti-oppression approach acknowledges that it is social discrimination and physical and institutional barriers that are the greatest challenge for those with disabilities., race, immigrant/refugee status and other layers of marginalization. Moreover, sector employees become better aware of the requirement of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (the Act) and what their organizations need to do to become accessible in the long term.

 Download our Accessibility Kit<

Module 1: Understanding Disability

This module allows us to interrogate the medical and social models of disability. We work towards gaining a greater understanding of how people with disabilities have been segregated, devalued, marginalized, and “minoritized” in many parts of the world with a focus on Canada.

Module 2: Inclusion, Accessibility and the Law

This module examines the relationship between accessibility and the law with a focus on understanding international, national, provincial/territorial legislations as they relate to people with disabilities.

Module 3: Immigrants and Racialized People with Disabilities

This module focuses on examining the relationship between disability, race, immigrant/refugee status and other layers of marginalization such as, socio-economic background, identity, age, etc.

Module 4: Direct Intervention

This module works through how to support newcomers with disabilities. Specifically, sector employees learn how to work with families who have children or young adults with disabilities and ways to support newcomers with disabilities in their own self-advocacy. Managers learn what they can realistically do to make their organizations more accessible (e.g. looking at their policies, diversifying their partnerships, including accessibility in their budgets to create a more accessible and inclusive environment).

DESCRIPTION

Moving to a new country presents many challenges and opportunities for newcomers. The settlement process can be especially challenging for newcomers with disabilities, who are further marginalized due to disability-related barriers in our communities and workplaces.

Learning who newcomers with disabilities are, how to welcome and accommodate them is something the settlement sector is becoming more aware of. While our broader understanding of disability has led to the enhancement of legislations and programs; when it comes to the unique obstacles facing newcomers with disabilities, service delivery has not been able to effectively address their needs.

OCASI is committed to supporting the settlement sector create welcoming, positive and inclusive spaces for all.

These webinars for Executive Directors including senior managers will provide you with an opportunity to learn:

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Webinar 1:

  • How barriers intersect and interlock impacting the experiences of newcomers with disabilities in Canada
  • More about the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disability Act as it relates to supporting newcomers with disabilities

To view the power point: download<

Webinar 2:

  • How to complete an accessibility audit of your workplace including what accessibility features an office or meeting should include
  • How to develop an action plan for priority accessibility issues including organizational budget
  • Where to apply for accessibility funds/grants and how to include it in the current CFP Less

To view the power point: download<

To listen to the webinar follow the link below:
attendee.gotowebinar.com/recording/5551123414538763777<

To request information on this page in an alternative format please email me at cniles@ocasi.ca<

PROGRAM RESOURCES

Handouts for Managers [PDF]< 
Handouts for Sector Employees [PDF]<

 

5 Project management tips for straters

To start with good IT PROJECT MANAGEMENT, you need to consider some key aspects. If you want to manage project you have manage these key aspects. Following are the key aspects- 1.Initiation 2.Schedule management 3.Stake holder management 4.Change management 5.Risk and issues management

CANADA EXCESSIVE DEMAND: OCASI Position Paper

CANADA EXCESSIVE DEMAND  http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/tools/medic/admiss/excessive.asp

Joint Submission on Medical Inadmissibility of Immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

<

OCASI POSITION PAPERS & BACKGROUNDERS<

November 16, 2017 - OCASI - Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants, together with Chinese and Southeast Asian Legal Clinic (CSALC) and South Asian Legal Clinic of Ontario (SALCO) made a joint submission to the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration, for their Study on Federal Government Policies and Guidelines Regarding Medical Inadmissibility of Immigrants.

Click here to download the Joint Submission [PDF].<

OCASI, CSALC and SALCO ask the Committee to recommend that Section 38(1)(c)< of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) should be repealed. The joint submission points out that the medical inadmissiblity rules discriminate against people with disabilities and people with medical conditions, the provision is applied inconsistently, and there are numerous exemptions that benefit only some applicants. The submission asks the Committee to recommend that the following groups should be exempt from the provision:

·        Caregivers and other migrant workers with pathway to permanent residence status

·        Applicants under the H&C application process; and

·        Sponsored parents and grandparents

Click here to read more about medical inadmissiblity and Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (IRPR) definition of “excessive demand on health and social services”.<

Click here to see more about the study by the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration.<

Outreach and Communication Strategy

Outreach and Communication Strategy

For outreach to be efficient and effective you need a plan. Developing an outreach strategy takes work, but is well worth the effort. Unfortunately, there is no “one-size-fits-all” approach. The following steps can serve as a guide. Once you have looked back on previous outreach activities and reflected on the degrees of success or failure, set the goals and outcomes for your new outreach campaign.

Develop and Carry Out Your Plan

Once you have completed all the preliminary steps, creating the actual plan should not be difficult. Your plan should include:

  • Budget
  • Key Audience(s)
  • Key Message(s)
  • Method(s) of Distribution:
    • Press Releases
    • Articles
    • Letters to the Editor
    • Social media
    • Press Conferences; Radio, Television or Press Interviews; and Media Tours
    • Spokespersons (successful learners, community

      The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

      leaders, celebrities, etc.)
    • Seminars or Speaking Engagements
    • Tables at events
    • Intended Response
    • Timelines

Trends & Issues: Professional Development in the Nonprofit Sector.

Professional development

All types of facilitated learning opportunities that aim to increase a person’s skills or knowledge, leading to personal development and career advancement. Learning opportunities may include courses, workshops, coaching, etc and may be specific to the present demands on an organization’s staff or leadership, or may be more broadly relevant to a person’s career goals.

in the nonprofit sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

is a vital tool for strengthening organizational effect­iveness in the face of continuous change. It stands against a backdrop in which community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

needs are many, resources are few and both funding and policy parameters are continuously in flux. At the same time, the field of professional development is itself evolving to meet the challenges of satisfying current training needs, responding to emerging ones and developing cost-effective options for how, when and what training is delivered. Is the level of demand for training.

Guide for Writing Proposals

Sample Outline

The following is a sample outline for a project proposal. Note that all questions for a section may not apply to your proposal, and should be used as a general guide only.

1.     Introduction (1 or 2 paragraphs)

2.      Motivation (1 to 3 paragraphs)

3.       Project Summary (1 paragraph)

4.       Project Details

5.       Conclusion (1 paragraph)

6.       Conclusion (1 paragraph)

Strategies for Effective Proposal Writing

Strategies for Effective Proposal Writing

Readiness is an important element of a successful proposal. Funders will want to know if you are an accountable organization. The following chart will help you self-assess your strengths and weaknesses by taking a look at the “workings” of your organization. z Why does your organization exist? z Who implements your goals and objectives? (the “work”) z How do you do it? are you a formal or informal organization? do you work well with others? do you leverage small successes into bigger ones (i.e. dollars, partnerships, timing)?

Once you are satisfied that you are indeed ready to develop your proposal and are targeting the appropriate funder, it is time to put pen to paper.

Attribution. (Ontario Healthy Communities Coalition)

Diversity at Work

Diversity at Work

Creating an inclusive and supportive work environment

Once an organization has successfully modified their recruitment and hiring practices to reach a more diverse audience, the next step is to successfully engage and support them as employees.

Visit the following HR Toolkit sections for information on HR practices that support an organization’s ability to engage and retain diverse teams. These practices are not exclusive to diversity and inclusion efforts but are considered particularly important to the successful engagement and retention of diverse talent.

Orientation< 
Employee engagement and retention< 
Performance management< 
Flexible work arrangements< 
Interpersonal communication< 
Learning & development<

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