Strengthening Communities

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How to Conduct a Needs Assessment for Your Nonprofit Program

needs assessment is an important part of nonprofit program planning. If you’re thinking of starting a new program, for example, a needs assessment to determine whether the program is necessary should be the first step you take.

A needs assessment is more or less a research project. You don’t necessarily need to hold to the strict requirements of scientific inquiry, but just as you do when collecting information to help guide organizational planning, you should do everything possible to ensure that the information is accurate and free of bias.

Some people say they don’t want to share an idea with others because they’re afraid someone may steal it. Although you can’t rule out the chances of this happening, it’s a rare occurrence. In almost all cases, being open about your plans is a good idea.

Proposal Writing - RFP

A Project Proposal is a document which you present to potential sponsors to receive funding or get your project approved.

http://project-proposal.casual.pm/#about-proposal

Project Proposals contain key information about your project. They are essential for your sponsors since they’ll use them to evaluate your project and determine whether or not they’ll allocate funds for it.Despite the fact that many different formats are available, roughly 80-90% of all Project Proposals follow a similar template. They mostly all have the same structure which contains a few key points.

If you are familiar with proposals please scroll to the templates< and samples<. If you’re not, please take a look at the About Project Proposals<Video Guides< and Further Reading< sections to find out more information.

We have compiled a few templates< in this toolkit to help you chose the most appropriate one for your business. For instance, you’ll find templates and generic business proposals, as well as NGO, grant, university and freelance project proposals.

Change Management Best Practices Guide

This Change Management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

Best Practices

Best Practices / Good Practices / Promising Practices

Ways of working that are acknowledged as effective and deserving of emulation.

Guide is designed to give general guidance to public sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

bodies undertaking change. It is not intended to be prescriptive nor exhaustive. A 'one-size-fits-all' approach to managing change is ineffective, as each public sector organisation is different, with its own structure, history, culture and needs, and each change event is different. This Guide is intended as a tool to disseminate ideas and best practice guidance on common change success factors and the sorts of actions that public sector organisations can undertake to address them.

Project Evaluation Guide for Non-Profit Organizations

 

This guide developed by Imagine Canada is designed to assist charitable and non-profit organizations to conduct precise and appropriate project evaluations, and then communicate and use the results of evaluation effectively. Its primary focus is to help organizations that would like to perform project evaluations by using their internal resources, and to make evaluation a part of their project management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

and strategic development.

Imagine Canada 2006 Project Evaluation Guide for Non-Profit Organizations

A Guide to Measuring Advocacy and Policy

As more non-profits engaged in advocacy and policy work to address public issues and effect social change, there is a growing desire to gauge the impact of investments in this area. How to evaluate the effectiveness of advocacy and policy work is an emerging question of interest within the philanthropic and non-profit audiences. Answering that question, however, has proven difficult because relatively few instructive resources exist to help those who wish to measure progress in this area.  The guide is presented in two main sections: Section 1 is an overview of the context for measurement of advocacy and policy work, including the inherent evaluation challenges (pg. 6). Section 2 presents a menu of outcome categories which describe changes that may result from advocacy and policy work and discusses evaluation design issues that relate to outcome selection. This section also outlines several factors that influence the selection of an appropriate evaluation design and provides both a case example and examples of data collection tools (pg. 11).

Integrated Anti-Oppression framework for Reviewing and Developing Policy

This resource was developed by Spring Tide. It aims to help organization review their current policy using an Anti- oppression

The systemic mistreatment of one group of people by another group of people between whom there is an imbalance of institutional power. Mistreatment can include psychological, physical and verbal forms of abuse and subjugation; it can be subtle and need not be intentional. Examples include racism, sexism, ableism, heterosexism, classism, and so on.

framework. This toolkit is full ideas of what organizations can do to challenge social inequality (pg. 2) Barriers and challenges to integrated ant-oppression (pg. 6) Applying anti-oppression

Used as an umbrella term that includes activities, practices, policies, ways of thinking, and initiatives that address oppression in all its forms (e.g. racism, homophobia, classism, ablism). Key to anti-oppression is an understanding that inequality and oppression exist in the world, and that all of us participate in unequal power dynamics in a variety of ways. Anti-oppression involves reflection and making choices about how to give, share, wield, or withhold power to assist and act in solidarity with people who are marginalized. Anti-oppression is sometimes used with the terms equity and accessibility: Anti-oppression is a broader term that includes a commitment to equity and accessibility. See both equity and accessibility.

to policies (pg. 9) setting up a policy review committee and accessing the accessible of your  policies and work sheets (pg. 15-40)

Alexander, M, (2008) An Integrated Anti-Oppression framework for Reviewing and Developing Policy. Springtide Resources. 

Anti-Oppression Practice for Community Groups

This document developed by Centre for community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

organizations came out of workshops that conducted 2012-2013. The goal of this document is to help start dialogue on how to build organizations and workplaces where all experiences and voices are welcome, valued and fully able to participate. It is not meant to be a comprehensive list of strategies, or a "quick fix"- rather, it provides ideas regarding challenges to implementing Anti-Oppressive practices within organizations, as well as Strategies and Solutions to make organizations more open to fostering equality and diversity.

Centre for Community Organizations (2013) Anti-Oppression

Used as an umbrella term that includes activities, practices, policies, ways of thinking, and initiatives that address oppression in all its forms (e.g. racism, homophobia, classism, ablism). Key to anti-oppression is an understanding that inequality and oppression exist in the world, and that all of us participate in unequal power dynamics in a variety of ways. Anti-oppression involves reflection and making choices about how to give, share, wield, or withhold power to assist and act in solidarity with people who are marginalized. Anti-oppression is sometimes used with the terms equity and accessibility: Anti-oppression is a broader term that includes a commitment to equity and accessibility. See both equity and accessibility.

Practice for Community Groups

Human Resources Tools: Tips on Leading and Contributing to Meetings

Human Resources Tools: Tips on Leading and Contributing to Meetings

As managers, you’re always busy planning, preparing for and running meetings with your own staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

, with other members of the organization or the sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

, or simply contributing to other people’s meetings. This guide looks at your role as a meeting leader and as a meeting participant. It examines how to plan and conduct meetings effectively: defining your desired outcome, preparing for the meeting, making discussions constructive, handling interruptions and conflict, and generating ideas.

Cultural Career Council Ontario (N.D.) Tips on Leading and Contributing to Meetings Retrieval Date, May 15, 2014 

Human Resources Tools: Leadership and Building Your Team

The need for effective leaders in the cultural sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

is enormous, not just to ensure the success of their organizations but also to promote and act as spokespersons for their community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

. This is particularly important for increasing community interest and involvement in the arts, as well as for commitment and financial support from private and public sector sponsors.

A step-by-step guide: creating an outreach plan

This step-by-step guide is intended to be used as a tool to help you create your own outreach plan. Outreach can be described as using a specific message to communicate between your group and the public for mutual benefit. Creating and implementing a basic outreach plan for your parents’ group will help you create awareness, recruit members, and gain resources.

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