Improving Conditions for Immigrants & Refugees

Click on any of the standards below:

Boosting Settlement Services

Boosting Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

Services

Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration<

Ontario is helping to boost capacity for settlement agencies in six communities where federally funded Resettlement Assistance Program agencies are located, and which are expected to receive the majority of refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

from the Syrian conflict - who began arriving yesterday.  

Earlier this year, Ontario committed $8.5 million <over two and a half years to help deliver both settlement and integration supports to refugees, as well as to help organizations and groups that are supporting private sponsors. Ontario is allocating over $3.7 million of this funding to eight settlement agencies in six communities. These funds will help provide comprehensive, community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

-based supports for refugees, such as: 

·         First-language settlement services

·         Specialized supports for refugee women and youth

·         Access to trauma counselling and mental health services

·         Housing assistance

·         Employment supports.

The organizations receiving funding are: Arab Community Centre of Toronto (Toronto), Catholic Centre for Immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

(Ottawa), COSTI Immigrant Services (Toronto), London Cross Cultural Learner Centre (London), Malton Neighbourhood Services (Mississauga), Multicultural Council of Windsor and Essex County (Windsor), Reception House Waterloo Region (Kitchener-Waterloo) and Wesley Urban Ministries (Hamilton).

More organizations will receive funding for refugee-targeted settlement services in the coming months to meet a range of needs and address service gaps in communities where refugees will settle.

The province is encouraging Ontarians to either post, or sign up to receive information on volunteer opportunities to help welcome refugees at SPARK Ontario<, specifically on its webpage on Welcoming Syrian Refugees.<

Quick Facts

·         In 2014, Ontario welcomed more than 11,400 refugees from around the world to start a new life in the province.

·         The federal government is responsible for refugee selection, screening and the provision of settlement services, including finding interim lodging.

·         On December 4, 2015, Ontario allocated $1.8 million< to several organizations that help attract and support private refugee sponsors.

Background Information

·         Settlement Agencies and Refugee Sponsorship Support Organizations<

Sexual Harassment Policy - COSTI

This sample Sexual Harassment policy was developed by COSTI. It covers implementation principles

Accepted bases of action or conduct. For the Organizational Standards Initiative, our guiding principles provide a value‐laden foundation on which our work can be based.

, fundamental principles, and definitions of sexual harassment in the workplace and complaints procedures. This document can be modified for use within other organizations and adapted into an anti-oppression

Used as an umbrella term that includes activities, practices, policies, ways of thinking, and initiatives that address oppression in all its forms (e.g. racism, homophobia, classism, ablism). Key to anti-oppression is an understanding that inequality and oppression exist in the world, and that all of us participate in unequal power dynamics in a variety of ways. Anti-oppression involves reflection and making choices about how to give, share, wield, or withhold power to assist and act in solidarity with people who are marginalized. Anti-oppression is sometimes used with the terms equity and accessibility: Anti-oppression is a broader term that includes a commitment to equity and accessibility. See both equity and accessibility.

plan.

Workplace Violence and Harassment Understanding the Law

This guide explains what every worker, supervisor and contractor needs to know about workplace violence and workplace harassment requirements in the Occupational Health and Safety Act. It describes everyone’s rights and responsibilities and answers, in plain language, the questions that are most commonly asked about these requirements. 

What is sexual Harassment?

This document provides definitions and terms and identifies inappropriate acts, gestures and attitudes that may result in sexual harassment in the workplace. 

Sexual Harassment Policy

This sample policy outlines employees’ responsibilities in ensuring that a workplace is free from sexual harassment. This sample policy could be a starting point for any organization to develop their own anti-sexual harassment policy in their organization. 

Sexual Harassment Policy Can Save Employers Money

This resource aims to educate employer on the ramifications of incidences of sexual harassment in the workplace. It stipulates that sexual harassment in the workplace are both tangible and non-tangible and occurrence of sexual harassment in the workplace have potential cost associated, which may include staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

taking off sick time, low morale and productivity, absenteeism, high turnover and damages in the event of a successful complaint.    Giesbrecht T and Foster K Sexual Harassment Policy Can Save Employers Money  

Developing a Workplace Anti-harassment Policy

Developing a Workplace Anti-harassment Policy

This resource produced by the Canadian Human Rights Commission can be used as a template to create your own organizations anti-harassment policy.

Canadian Human Rights Commission 

Change Management Best Practices Guide

This Change Management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

Best Practices

Best Practices / Good Practices / Promising Practices

Ways of working that are acknowledged as effective and deserving of emulation.

Guide is designed to give general guidance to public sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

bodies undertaking change. It is not intended to be prescriptive nor exhaustive. A 'one-size-fits-all' approach to managing change is ineffective, as each public sector organisation is different, with its own structure, history, culture and needs, and each change event is different. This Guide is intended as a tool to disseminate ideas and best practice guidance on common change success factors and the sorts of actions that public sector organisations can undertake to address them.

Communication Access for People who have Communication Disabilities

This booklet is intended to inform organizations about providing accessible goods and services to people who have communication disabilities, and may be a helpful resource in complying with the customer service standard under the Accessibility

The degree to which organizations and their services can be accessed by as many diverse people as possible. Whether something is accessible can depend, for example, on service design, organizational climate and culture, physical structures. Accessibility is related to the concept of ‘barriers,’ which are practices, structures, attitudes, and other things that block access. See also the definition of anti-oppression.

for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (AODA)

The Accessibility Directorate of Ontario (2009) Communication Access for People who have Communication Disabilities

Change Management Best Practices Guide

 

This Change Management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

Best Practices

Best Practices / Good Practices / Promising Practices

Ways of working that are acknowledged as effective and deserving of emulation.

Guide is designed to give general guidance to public sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

bodies undertaking change. It is not intended to be prescriptive nor exhaustive. It is not intended to be prescriptive nor exhaustive. A 'one-size-fits-all' approach to managing change is ineffective, as each public sector organisation is different, with its own structure, history, culture and needs, and each change event is different. The characteristics of each change (type, breadth, size, origin etc.) also influence the way change is planned and effectively managed.

Change Management Best Practices Guide.  The Queensland Government Chief Information Office: Retrieval date March 26, 2014

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