Improving Conditions for Immigrants & Refugees

Click on any of the standards below:

Bill 148, Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, 2017

http://www.ontla.on.ca/bills/bills-files/41_Parliament/Session2/b148rep1_e.pdf<

 

Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, 2017

This reprint of the Bill is marked to indicate the changes that were made in Committee.

An Act to amend the Employment Standards

Desired and achievable levels of performance against which actual performance can be compared. Standards help to bolster public confidence, promote transparency and accountability, enhance performance and effectiveness, and help organizations achieve their mission, improve their practices, and educate board and staff about good practices.

Act, 2000, the Labour Relations Act, 1995 and the Occupational Health and Safety Act and to make related amendments to other Acts

Section 23.1 (Determination of minimum wage) is amended to increase the minimum wage on January 1, 2018. The minimum wage increases again on January 1, 2019 and is subject to an annual inflation adjustment on October 1 of every year starting in 2019.  The minimum wage for employees who serve liquor now applies only if the employee also regularly receives tips or other gratuities from their work.

Growing Gap: Immigrants, Racialized Residents in the 2016 Census

Immigrant and Refugee Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

Services

Ontario continues to see a decline in the share of new immigrant arrivals to Canada despite receiving the highest overall number of immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

of any province or territory. The decrease in numbers is cause for concern for Ontario’s immigrant and refugee serving sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

since it will likely result in less federal settlement funding for Ontario region.

The federal government is the biggest funder of immigrant and refugee settlement services. The federal funding formula is based on a rolling average of three years of immigrant arrivals by province/territory. Ontario receives the highest number of immigrants from all provinces and territories. But the decline in Ontario immigrant arrivals, a trend that began in 2001, resulted in significant cuts to federal settlement funding to the province in 2011 and in later years. The Ontario immigrant and refugee-serving sector saw a significant loss of services and programs, job loss, and in some cases the closing of immigrant-serving organizations. Last year, Ontario faced a cut in its funding allocation which was mitigated by the allocation of additional funding for refugee resettlement. At the same time, demand for settlement services increased with the arrival of over 11,000 Syrian and other refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

in the province.

OCASI urges the federal government to review the funding allocation model to ensure funding stability for the sector, thus assuring stability of programs and services and reducing precarious work in the sector.

The data shows that recent immigrants were 3.5% of the total population in Canada in 2016, while 21.9% reported an immigrant background. In Ontario, recent immigrants were approximately 3.6% of the population, while 29.1% reported an immigrant background.

Basic Guide to Program Evaluation

Program Evaluation

A Brief Introduction ...

Note that the concept of program evaluation can include a wide variety of methods to evaluate many aspects of programs in nonprofit or for-profit organizations. There are numerous books and other materials that provide in-depth analysis of evaluations, their designs, methods, combination of methods and techniques of analysis. However, personnel do not have to be experts in these topics to carry out a useful program evaluation. The "20-80" rule applies here, that 20% of effort generates 80% of the needed results. It's better to do what might turn out to be an average effort at evaluation than to do no evaluation at all. (Besides, if you resort to bringing in an evaluation consultant, you should be a smart consumer. Far too many program evaluations generate information that is either impractical or irrelevant -- if the information is understood at all.) This document orients personnel to the nature of program evaluation and how it can be carried out in a realistic and practical manner.

Some Major Types of Program Evaluation

Goals-Based Evaluation

Process-Based Evaluations

Outcomes-Based Evaluation

Four Levels of Evaluation:

There are four levels of evaluation information that can be gathered from clients

This term is used here to refer to the service-users that organizations work for and with and provide services to. We have chosen to use clients because of its common currency and ease of use, while acknowledging that it may unintentionally connote a particular ideology of patronage or a purely financial transactional relationships between organizations and the people they serve.

, including getting their:
1. reactions and feelings (feelings are often poor indicators

Evidence or measures that show that a certain condition exists or certain results have or have not been achieved. They tell you how much progress has been made toward the intended goals, objectives, outputs or outcomes. Here, indicators are the practical and measurable markers that monitor specific aspects of a standard. Meeting certain indicators means the achievement of some level of the standard.

that your service made lasting impact)
2. learning (enhanced attitudes, perceptions or knowledge)
3. changes in skills (applied the learning to enhance behaviors)
4. effectiveness (improved performance because of enhanced behaviors)

https://managementhelp.org/evaluation/program-evaluation-guide.htm<

Immigrants' Perspectives: Statistics Canada Survey

Immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

’ perspectives on their first four years in Canada: Highlights from three waves of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada

This article by Statistics Canada is broken down into 3 sections:

Section one: Perspectives on life in Canada

Section two: Difficulties encountered

Section three: Assessment of life in Canada

Introduction

The experiences of immigrants during the settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

process can be examined from a number of different perspectives. Over the past 15 years, settlement in Canada has most often been examined in terms of immigrants’ labour market and financial experiences. Among the topics investigated are the earnings trajectories of immigrants after arrival, the economic returns to their foreign credentials and experience, their ability to find employment in their area of specialization, and their incidence of low income.

In spite of these challenges, most of the new immigrants who remain in Canada for four years are positive about their decision to come here. Most consistently say they would make the same decision to come here again and the majority has already initiated the process to become Canadian citizens. Furthermore, about two-thirds of them feel that their expectations of life in Canada have been exceeded, met or improved upon. That being said, the outlooks of new immigrants who have not made material gains while in Canada express less positive views. These individuals are more likely than others to feel their expectations about life in Canada have not been met and that coming here was not the right decision.

https://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-008-x/2007000/9627-eng.htm#6<

The Role of A Settlement Worker & Job Requirements

Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

Work

Settlement workers are usually the first connection to life in Canada. A Settlement Worker supports immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

and refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

in schools, libraries, at an organization (or it's local hub). 

The organization responsible for the service must:

  1. Train the staff

    For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

    and program managers
  2. Develop capacity
  3. Plan for longterm sustainabilty
  4. Manage organizational risks 
  5. Demonstrate strengths and accountablility to funders

 

Job Description has two primary components:

 

1. Individual Service to Newcomer Clients

This term is used here to refer to the service-users that organizations work for and with and provide services to. We have chosen to use clients because of its common currency and ease of use, while acknowledging that it may unintentionally connote a particular ideology of patronage or a purely financial transactional relationships between organizations and the people they serve.

<

2. Group Service to Newcomer Clients

 

The Duties involved:

1. Individual Service to Newcomer Clients:

  • Coordinates information, activities and linkages with other staff/programs as assigned.
  • Distributes identified promotional material about the services for newcomers

    In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

    to each
  • newcomer client
  • Meets with clients to assess their settlement strengths and needs
  • Assists clients to prioritize their settlement needs and facilitates referrals to the closest and
  • most appropriate community

    The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

    services
  • Provides services in a supportive and culturally sensitive manner
  • Distributes generic promotional materials identified by IRCC
  • Facilitate client assess to service by telephoning for appointments, translation documents,
  • Assisting clients to fill out forms, write correspondence, etc.,
  • Advocate on behalf of clients with institutions, employers, landlords etc.,
  • Provide support for school enrolment for all newcomer family members as necessary
  • Assist newcomers to understand their rights and responsibilities as new Canadians
  • Identify and bring forward for discussion/resolution, any challenge barrier or gaps in service for clientele.

 

2. Group Service to Newcomer Clients:

  • Coordinates information, activities and linkages with other staff/programs as assigned.
  • In co-ordination with the other Settlement Counsellor, plan and coordinate settlement related activities and programs for groups of newcomer clients
  • Involves resource people from the workplace. and other community services in these programs
  • Provide workshops and information sessions on pertinent issues

Work with other Staff:

  • Negotiates a protocol for program partners to identify newcomer clients and refer them to the Settlement Counsellor.
  • Facilitates constructive and culturally sensitive communication between program staff and eligible clients
  • Informs administration and colleagues about emerging settlement related issues, including a profile of the community.
  • Collect newcomer client feedback (e.g. surveys, workshop evaluations, user needs assessment, etc.) to track outcomes of settlement services.
  • Works with a team of professionals to ensure that the clients needs are met
  • Works flexible hours, including evening and weekends, according to peak user times, as schedules.

Administration:

  • Maintains updated supply of handouts on services, resources and policies that are relevant eligible clients Ensures client confidentiality Represents agency on assigned committees
  • Enters statistical information in a newcomer data system using a IRCC and/or approved tracking form
  • Prepare and submit reports, statistics, etc.,
  • Make on going site visits and establishes networks with other settlement counselors, other community groups including faith organizations, businesses, community centres, schools, day cares, etc, in the city/country.
  • Attends training opportunities
  • Keep accurate and up-to-date files on clients
  • Works flexible hours, including evening and weekends, according to peak user times, as schedules

 

Toolkit on Effective Mentoring for Newcomer Youth Facing Barriers

This is an good resource to assist service providers when mentoring newcomer and refugee youth http://ontariomentoringcoalition.ca/mentoringyouthfacingbarriers/tailored-mentoring-for-youth-with-specific-needs/newcomer-youth/<

Key Lessons

  • Developing and planning a mentoring program for newcomer youth should include:
    • Consulting with the community

      The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

      through an advisory committee or needs assessment process;
    • Understanding the particular challenges related to the community’s transition to their new country;
    • Hiring staff

      For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

      from the community or those who have a strong understanding of the community;
    •  Reviewing program materials regularly to ensure cultural appropriateness; and Supporting past mentees in
  • Programs should include family members in mentoring as much as possible to help the youth balance learning about their new culture and maintaining previous cultural values

    Values are ideals, standards, or qualities considered worthwhile or desirable. See also “principles,” which are often shaped by values.

    and norms.3, 4
  • Mentors should receive training in various community-specific issues, such as the immigration process (and its challenges), trauma (mental and physical issues), and cultural competency.
  • Body map:

Community Resources Serving Immigrant and Refugee Families

In many communities, local agencies help immigrant and refugee families adapt to life in Canada. This list will help health professionals become familiar with services in their province/territory or region.

http://www.kidsnewtocanada.ca/beyond/resources<

For a list of French services, visit the French side of our site<

Ontario government resources

·        Ontario Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration<: Information on finding a home or child care<registering children in school< health care and social services, <filling out forms and access interpretation services.

Settlement.org< provides newcomers to Ontario with information about language programs, housing, health, education, recreation and more. Services such as crisis lines, community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

health centres and settlement services can be sorted by region<.

InMyLanguage.org< provides Ontario residents with information in 11 languages. Resources cover a wide range of topics including health, education, legal matters and daily life.

Welcome to Ontario kiosks provide basic information on settlement services including employment, education and other resources available to support newcomers. Currently there are 51 kiosks< situated across Ontario.

Chinese Family Services of Ontario< is a non-profit, accredited professional counselling, family services and settlement agency with a focus on Chinese Canadians.

NewYouth.ca<: Articles and videos aimed at newcomer youth. Links to services and programs, and listings of events for newcomer youth.

 

Boosting Settlement Services

Boosting Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

Services

Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration<

Ontario is helping to boost capacity for settlement agencies in six communities where federally funded Resettlement Assistance Program agencies are located, and which are expected to receive the majority of refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

from the Syrian conflict - who began arriving yesterday.  

Earlier this year, Ontario committed $8.5 million <over two and a half years to help deliver both settlement and integration supports to refugees, as well as to help organizations and groups that are supporting private sponsors. Ontario is allocating over $3.7 million of this funding to eight settlement agencies in six communities. These funds will help provide comprehensive, community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

-based supports for refugees, such as: 

·         First-language settlement services

·         Specialized supports for refugee women and youth

·         Access to trauma counselling and mental health services

·         Housing assistance

·         Employment supports.

The organizations receiving funding are: Arab Community Centre of Toronto (Toronto), Catholic Centre for Immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

(Ottawa), COSTI Immigrant Services (Toronto), London Cross Cultural Learner Centre (London), Malton Neighbourhood Services (Mississauga), Multicultural Council of Windsor and Essex County (Windsor), Reception House Waterloo Region (Kitchener-Waterloo) and Wesley Urban Ministries (Hamilton).

More organizations will receive funding for refugee-targeted settlement services in the coming months to meet a range of needs and address service gaps in communities where refugees will settle.

The province is encouraging Ontarians to either post, or sign up to receive information on volunteer opportunities to help welcome refugees at SPARK Ontario<, specifically on its webpage on Welcoming Syrian Refugees.<

Quick Facts

·         In 2014, Ontario welcomed more than 11,400 refugees from around the world to start a new life in the province.

·         The federal government is responsible for refugee selection, screening and the provision of settlement services, including finding interim lodging.

·         On December 4, 2015, Ontario allocated $1.8 million< to several organizations that help attract and support private refugee sponsors.

Background Information

·         Settlement Agencies and Refugee Sponsorship Support Organizations<

Sexual Harassment Policy - COSTI

This sample Sexual Harassment policy was developed by COSTI. It covers implementation principles

Accepted bases of action or conduct. For the Organizational Standards Initiative, our guiding principles provide a value‐laden foundation on which our work can be based.

, fundamental principles, and definitions of sexual harassment in the workplace and complaints procedures. This document can be modified for use within other organizations and adapted into an anti-oppression

Used as an umbrella term that includes activities, practices, policies, ways of thinking, and initiatives that address oppression in all its forms (e.g. racism, homophobia, classism, ablism). Key to anti-oppression is an understanding that inequality and oppression exist in the world, and that all of us participate in unequal power dynamics in a variety of ways. Anti-oppression involves reflection and making choices about how to give, share, wield, or withhold power to assist and act in solidarity with people who are marginalized. Anti-oppression is sometimes used with the terms equity and accessibility: Anti-oppression is a broader term that includes a commitment to equity and accessibility. See both equity and accessibility.

plan.

Workplace Violence and Harassment Understanding the Law

This guide explains what every worker, supervisor and contractor needs to know about workplace violence and workplace harassment requirements in the Occupational Health and Safety Act. It describes everyone’s rights and responsibilities and answers, in plain language, the questions that are most commonly asked about these requirements. 

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