Improving Conditions for Immigrants & Refugees

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Homelessness and Shelters: Best, Promising and Emerging Practices

Best, Promising and Emerging Practices

 

Given the growing interest in developing solutions to homelessness, it is increasingly important to know what workswhy it works and for whom it works. There is extensive research that examines causes and current conditions of homelessness but little –although growing—literature that can describe effective interventions in a practical way. The sharing of solutions is key to avoid “reinventing the wheel” in each community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

. While there are few “one-size-fits-all” solutions to homelessness, with the right tools and information communities could learn from each other and adapt initiatives to local contexts.

Yet, many communities and service providers in the non-profit sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

lack effective tools, resources and capacity to engage in rigorous program evaluation or to disseminate knowledge learned in order to assist service providers and program planners elsewhere. Sharing best, promising or emerging practices is about communication and alerting those working in the field to a strategy that demonstrates positive results.

In “What Works and for Whom<”, the Canadian Homelessness Research Network defines and explains the differences between best, promising and emerging practices as follows:

 

1.       BEST PRACTICE

2.       PROMISING PRACTICE

3.       EMERGING PRACTICE

OCASI General Interview Questions

These are general Interview questions used by OCASI to recruit for any position. OCASI usually add more questions to customize it; making it relevant to the position. This is just sharing, and OCASI is not asking you to adopt it in any way.

Refugees and Asylum

Refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

and Asylum

In this section, you will learn about applying for refugee status from within Canada, find out how to come to Canada as a refugee, sponsor a refugee or find refugee services in Canada.

 

Refugees and Asylum

In this section you will learn about applying for refugee status from within Canada, find out how to come to Canada as a refugee, sponsor a refugee or find refugee services in Canada.

  • How Canada’s refugee system works
  • Irregular border crossings and asylum in Canada
  • Claim refugee protection from inside Canada
  • Refugees from outside Canada  Helping Syrian refugees
  • Appeal a refugee claim
  • Who can sponsor refugees
  • Key figures on asylum claims

Permanent Resident Program

Immigration, Refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

, and Citizenship Canada facilitates the entry of permanent residents in a way that maximizes their economic, social, and cultural contribution to Canada. There are residency requirements and obligations to obtain and maintain permanent resident status.

You will learn about the following:

1.Economic classes

Instructions for processing applications submitted under economic classes, for which applicants are selected on the basis of their ability to become economically established in Canada<

2.Non-economic classes

Instructions for processing permanent residence applications submitted under family-related and humanitarian classes, for which applicants are selected on the basis of family-reunification, social, and humanitarian objectives<

3.Permanent resident card and status

The permanent resident card (PR card)< is the official proof of permanent resident status in Canada.

See also:

Changes to the Citizenship Act as a Result of Bill C-6

Changes to the Citizenship Act as a Result of Bill C-6

Backgrounder

Bill C-6, an Act to amend the Citizenship Act and make consequential amendments to another Act, received Royal Assent on June 19, 2017. This chart explains the changes that have been made to the Citizenship Act and indicates when these changes are expected to come into force.

 

  1. Changes expected to take effect in 2018
  2. Changes that already took effect as of January 11, 2018
  3. Changes that took effect as of October 11, 2017
  4. Changes that took effect immediately upon Royal Assent on June 19, 2017

Changes to the Citizenship Act as a Result of Bill C-6

Changes to the Citizenship Act as a Result of Bill C-6

Backgrounder

Bill C-6, an Act to amend the Citizenship Act and make consequential amendments to another Act, received Royal Assent on June 19, 2017. This chart explains the changes that have been made to the Citizenship Act and indicates when these changes are expected to come into force.

 

  1. Changes expected to take effect in 2018
  2. Changes that already took effect as of January 11, 2018
  3. Changes that took effect as of October 11, 2017
  4. Changes that took effect immediately upon Royal Assent on June 19, 2017

2017 OCASI Professional Development Conference Needs Assessment

2017 OCASI Professional Development Conference

Needs Assessment Results
 
1. Working with Individual Clients
·       Case management 82.86%
·       Assisting Clients in Accessing Services 81.16%
·       Strength ­based Approach in Settlement Work 73.91%
2. Supporting Specific Communities
·       Working with Refugees 79.71
·       Working with Newcomer Youth 75.71%
·       Women’s Programming 64.29%
·       Services for Persons Living with Disabilities 64.29%
3. Working at the Broader Community Level
·       Effective Partnership Development and Collaboration 82.86%
·       Working with Communities to Welcome Immigrants and Refugees 79.41%
·       Building Immigrant Capacity for Community Development and Engagement 77.14%
4. Understanding & Addressing Broader Issues Affecting Immigrant Settlement & Integration
·       Systemic Barriers Affecting Immigrants and Refugees: An Advocacy approach 81.43%
·       Immigration Trends and Updates on Legislation 81.16%
·       Addressing Violence Against Immigrant Women 74.29%
·       Immigration Categories: What the Settlement Worker Needs to Know 72.46%
5. General Professional and Personal Development
·       Conflict Resolution Strategies 78.26%
·       Intercultural Communication Skills 77.14%
·       Outcome ­Based Measurement &Service Evaluation: Tools, Practices &Models 75.71%
6. Information and/or Roundtable Discussions on Sectoral Issues
·       Development for Settlement Workers: Tools, Practices and Models 84.29%
·       Core Competencies for Settlement Workers 75.71%
Career Planning and Advancement in the Immigrant and Refugee-Serving Sector 65.71%

Bill 148, Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, 2017

http://www.ontla.on.ca/bills/bills-files/41_Parliament/Session2/b148rep1_e.pdf<

 

Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, 2017

This reprint of the Bill is marked to indicate the changes that were made in Committee.

An Act to amend the Employment Standards

Desired and achievable levels of performance against which actual performance can be compared. Standards help to bolster public confidence, promote transparency and accountability, enhance performance and effectiveness, and help organizations achieve their mission, improve their practices, and educate board and staff about good practices.

Act, 2000, the Labour Relations Act, 1995 and the Occupational Health and Safety Act and to make related amendments to other Acts

Section 23.1 (Determination of minimum wage) is amended to increase the minimum wage on January 1, 2018. The minimum wage increases again on January 1, 2019 and is subject to an annual inflation adjustment on October 1 of every year starting in 2019.  The minimum wage for employees who serve liquor now applies only if the employee also regularly receives tips or other gratuities from their work.

Growing Gap: Immigrants, Racialized Residents in the 2016 Census

Immigrant and Refugee Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

Services

Ontario continues to see a decline in the share of new immigrant arrivals to Canada despite receiving the highest overall number of immigrants

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

of any province or territory. The decrease in numbers is cause for concern for Ontario’s immigrant and refugee serving sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

since it will likely result in less federal settlement funding for Ontario region.

The federal government is the biggest funder of immigrant and refugee settlement services. The federal funding formula is based on a rolling average of three years of immigrant arrivals by province/territory. Ontario receives the highest number of immigrants from all provinces and territories. But the decline in Ontario immigrant arrivals, a trend that began in 2001, resulted in significant cuts to federal settlement funding to the province in 2011 and in later years. The Ontario immigrant and refugee-serving sector saw a significant loss of services and programs, job loss, and in some cases the closing of immigrant-serving organizations. Last year, Ontario faced a cut in its funding allocation which was mitigated by the allocation of additional funding for refugee resettlement. At the same time, demand for settlement services increased with the arrival of over 11,000 Syrian and other refugees

In this document, the terms ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers’ are intended to be broadly inclusive. Our varied use of ‘immigrants,’ ‘refugees,’ and ‘newcomers,’ is intended to reflect the breadth and heterogeneity of the communities served by OCASI’s membership, many of whom have been in Canada for many years and/or have less-than-full status, for example.

in the province.

OCASI urges the federal government to review the funding allocation model to ensure funding stability for the sector, thus assuring stability of programs and services and reducing precarious work in the sector.

The data shows that recent immigrants were 3.5% of the total population in Canada in 2016, while 21.9% reported an immigrant background. In Ontario, recent immigrants were approximately 3.6% of the population, while 29.1% reported an immigrant background.

Basic Guide to Program Evaluation

Program Evaluation

A Brief Introduction ...

Note that the concept of program evaluation can include a wide variety of methods to evaluate many aspects of programs in nonprofit or for-profit organizations. There are numerous books and other materials that provide in-depth analysis of evaluations, their designs, methods, combination of methods and techniques of analysis. However, personnel do not have to be experts in these topics to carry out a useful program evaluation. The "20-80" rule applies here, that 20% of effort generates 80% of the needed results. It's better to do what might turn out to be an average effort at evaluation than to do no evaluation at all. (Besides, if you resort to bringing in an evaluation consultant, you should be a smart consumer. Far too many program evaluations generate information that is either impractical or irrelevant -- if the information is understood at all.) This document orients personnel to the nature of program evaluation and how it can be carried out in a realistic and practical manner.

Some Major Types of Program Evaluation

Goals-Based Evaluation

Process-Based Evaluations

Outcomes-Based Evaluation

Four Levels of Evaluation:

There are four levels of evaluation information that can be gathered from clients

This term is used here to refer to the service-users that organizations work for and with and provide services to. We have chosen to use clients because of its common currency and ease of use, while acknowledging that it may unintentionally connote a particular ideology of patronage or a purely financial transactional relationships between organizations and the people they serve.

, including getting their:
1. reactions and feelings (feelings are often poor indicators

Evidence or measures that show that a certain condition exists or certain results have or have not been achieved. They tell you how much progress has been made toward the intended goals, objectives, outputs or outcomes. Here, indicators are the practical and measurable markers that monitor specific aspects of a standard. Meeting certain indicators means the achievement of some level of the standard.

that your service made lasting impact)
2. learning (enhanced attitudes, perceptions or knowledge)
3. changes in skills (applied the learning to enhance behaviors)
4. effectiveness (improved performance because of enhanced behaviors)

https://managementhelp.org/evaluation/program-evaluation-guide.htm<

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