Communications & Collaboration

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Education Training and Employment

Education, Training & Employment

This document speaks about developing education and employment programs. Most programs for youth experiencing homelessness in Canada focus on skills development (getting them into the job market) rather than providing them with an opportunity to finish school.

Inadequate income, employment and education are well-documented as contributing factors of people cycling in and out of homelessness. Solving these inadequacies would create possibilities of moving out of homelessness. 

Why Technology is Key to Building A Destination Workplace

Why Technology Is Key To Building A Destination Workplace.   Every organization wants to be known as an employer of choice — the kind of company where talented employees wish to work. But in reality, building a destination workplace is incredibly difficult and nuanced. It involves nearly every aspect of HR, from pay and benefits to training, diversity, transparent communication from leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

and so much more. It includes everything that makes up the employment relationship. It’s not so much a tangible thing as it is a particular type of psychological environment. But there are some tangible factors incorporated into designing a destination workplace, and one increasingly critical factor is technology. My organization's new survey on the future of work makes it crystal clear a company’s reputation as a digital leader has a huge bearing on its ability to attract and retain talent. Forty percent of survey respondents said they’ve left a job where they didn't have access to the latest digital tools, and 58% said they would need to find a new job to level up their digital skills. Today’s employees want to work in a digitally-savvy organization — meaning, employers must implement technologies for a more connected, efficient and modern workplace, as well as investing in strategies for training or re-skilling workers to be digitally competent. Making Digital Part Of The Experience Consider technology the new ping pong table. For years, having the latest digital tools was indicative of a great office environment, and it still is. Technology is a new means to create a framework to engage employees and is experiential, and employers need to tap into it. We did just that in our newest branch opening, where we mixed human-centered design and technology. A virtual assistant greets and connects guests with the person they’re meeting or information they’re seeking. Interactive kiosks use artificial intelligence (AI) and gamification software to help job seekers uncover well-matched career opportunities. The branch also features hoteling options with communal and individual workspaces. YOU MAY ALSO LIKE This kind of flexible IT infrastructure and layout is becoming more fundamental to the work experience, as agile and remote working grow. InCapital One’s 2017 Work Environment Survey, 85% of professional office workers called a flexible workplace "important," and 82% said their best ideas come while working in flexible spaces. While most companies today use digital tools for work in the simplest terms — virtual meetings, chatting, collaboration — they need to think bigger. Popular technologies like wearables for wellness are easy and fun to implement. And many of the most modern employers are already bringing AI, virtual reality and augmented reality (AR) into their workflow. One example is Boeing’s use of Google Glass to build planes faster, which has the potential to attract talent, as it’s an opportunity that professionals might not otherwise have to use innovative technology.   While not every company needs to simulate a process or environment with AR, actively looking for ways to integrate immersive technology is a huge, untapped opportunity to turn day-to-day work processes into employee experiences. Since the Capital One survey found 63% don't feel innovation is present enough in their current workplace design, this is an opportunity not to be missed. Getting People Comfortable With A Tech-Enabled Workplace Interactive technologies will be central to engaging people at work and enhancing their creativity and productivity. AI will improve the level of work people do by automating more mundane, administrative tasks. But none of this works without providing the training for employees to acquire new digital skills. Our study also revealed that 58% of workers do have access to the latest digital tools, but their employers may be lacking in training efforts. AI and automation can be a scary thing for employees if they feel threatened rather than empowered by it. Even office technology upgrades that are more entertainment-based or physical — like a virtual assistant — can go unused if not properly introduced. As you bring new digital tools into your office environment and experience, setting aside appropriate training resources so people can use them to their fullest is key. They don’t all have to be top-down training sessions. Tap into current employees' existing technology skills to lead lunch-and-learn sessions or demos during all-staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

meetings on how to use your latest and greatest technology. Destination workplaces aren’t just where people go to earn a paycheck. What makes them a destination is the fact that they deliver an intangible experience. Technology — and the appropriate training for it — should be part of the many components making up the experience, and early adopters will have an upper hand in achieving the sought-after “employer of choice” title.  

A Manager’s Guide to Choosing and Using Collaborative Networks

This report on public network management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

attempts to integrate and critically evaluate what is known about the various kinds of networks and network management. The framework presented in this document allows public managers in the non-profit and private sectors whose work is funded by government, to understand more clearly what kind of network they are attempting to manage or manage in. It will also provide a number of tools and methods that network managers can use to achieve network goals.

Milward, B. and Proven, K (2006) A Manager’s Guide to Choosing and Using Collaborative Networks

A step-by-step guide: creating an outreach plan

This step-by-step guide is intended to be used as a tool to help you create your own outreach plan. Outreach can be described as using a specific message to communicate between your group and the public for mutual benefit. Creating and implementing a basic outreach plan for your parents’ group will help you create awareness, recruit members, and gain resources.

Collaboration Processes: Inside the Black Box

This article contains a wealth of knowledge for people seeking to understand collaboration processes. The authors argue that public managers should look inside the “black box” of collaboration processes. Inside, they will find a complex construct of five variable dimensions: governanceRefers to the source of strategic thinking and decisions that shape and direct an organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Includes anything related to non‐profit boards as well as strategic leadership issues., administration, organizational autonomy, mutuality, and norms. Public managers must know these five dimensions and manage them intentionally in order to collaborate effectively.

 

Thomson, A & P, James. Collaboration Processes: Inside the Black Box. Public Administration Review • December 2006: Special Issue

Advancing Together the Roles of the Nonprofit Board in Successful Strategic Alliances

This resource developed by First Non-profit Foundation. It states that strategic alliances can improve organizations’ ability to advance the mission and serve their customers - by achieving a scale that increases the availability or types of programming and by making a deeper impact through the capabilities of several partners. Successful strategic alliances strengthen organizational capacityA multi‐faceted concept referring broadly to an organization’s power, strength, and ability to grow, develop, and accomplish its goals. Elements of capacity can include knowledge, people and resources. and quality, expand knowledge and connections, and enhance effectiveness through collaborative leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

, combined staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

and volunteers, joint fundraising, and shared technology and facilities.
 
Revised, by Emil Angelica and Linda Hoskins and Gary J. Stern (2011) Advancing Together the Roles of the Non-profit BoardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization. in Successful Strategic Alliances, First Non-profit Foundation

Merging Non-profit Organizations the Art and Science of the Deal

The number of mergers involving non-profit organizations is increasing. So, too, is the need for concise, practical information to guide non-profit leaders through the merger process. This resource provides you information about non-profit mergers.  Different Perspectives of Merger (pg. 1) topics includes-Merger Process Overview and Context, Mergers and Other Types of Strategic, Alliances- Strategic Planning

An activity carried out on a regular basis to clarify an organization’s purpose, goals, priorities, and a plan for reaching those goals and addressing the priorities.

(pg. 11)
Environmental Assessment, Organizational Assessment, Forces Driving Strategic Alliance, Formation Partner Selection (pg. 19) Criteria for Selecting a Merger Partner, Creation of a Joint Feasibility Task Force, Building Trust with a Potential,  Partner, Due Diligence Defined (pg. 49), Defined Professional Assistance in Conducting, Due Diligence, Good Faith Assumptions, Managing the Unexpected and The Value of Due Diligence.  
 
Published in 2001 in the United States of America by the Mandel Center for Non-profit Organizations

Merging Non-profit Organizations the Art and Science of the Deal

The number of mergers involving non-profit organizations is increasing. So, too, is the need for concise, practical information to guide non-profit leaders through the merger process. This resource provides you information about non-profit mergers.  Different Perspectives of Merger (pg. 1) topics includes-Merger Process Overview and Context, Mergers and Other Types of Strategic, Alliances- Strategic Planning

An activity carried out on a regular basis to clarify an organization’s purpose, goals, priorities, and a plan for reaching those goals and addressing the priorities.

(pg. 11)
Environmental Assessment, Organizational Assessment, Forces Driving Strategic Alliance, Formation Partner Selection (pg. 19) Criteria for Selecting a Merger Partner, Creation of a Joint Feasibility Task Force, Building Trust with a Potential,  Partner, Due Diligence Defined (pg. 49), Defined Professional Assistance in Conducting, Due Diligence, Good Faith Assumptions, Managing the Unexpected and The Value of Due Diligence.  
 
Published in 2001 in the United States of America by the Mandel Center for Non-profit Organizations

Five Good Ideas about Knowing How to Work the Room

Abstract retrieved from YoutubeIt's a fact -- 70% of new business and 60% of jobs are attained through some sort of networking or relationship marketing. With statistics so compelling, how can you not spend time honing your networking skills. An entrepreneur, consultant and trainer, Lisa Mattam delivers an impactful and insightful presentation so you can take your networking skills to the next level. In her five good ideas, she explores the traditional channels for networking in addition to newer social media. She also provides concrete tips and tools that will enable the networker to leave an impression that lasts.Mattam, L. (January 19, 2011). Five Good Ideas about Knowing How to Work the Room. Maytree Foundation. 33:19. Retrieved from Youtube. 

Five Good Ideas about "Branding - Why Choose You?"

Abstract retrieved from YoutubeWe are all constantly selling - ourselves, our ideas, our recommendations and our organizations - to colleagues, bosses, direct reports, clients, politicians, bureaucrats, strategic partners, corporate sponsors and donors. This presentation provides you with a number of innovative ways to become more influential.Chamandy, I; Aber, K. (April 21, 2011). Five Good Ideas about "Branding - Why Choose You?". Maytree Foundation. 31:10. Retrieved from Youtube. 
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