Board roles & responsibilities

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Non-Profit Leadership Development

NONPROFIT LEADERSHIP

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

DEVELOPMENT: THE IMPORTANCE OF LEADERSHIP IN NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

 

In this article you will learn:

1. What is non-profit leadership?

2. The Importance of Leadership Development in nonprofit organizations

3. Core competenciesA set of knowledge, skills and abilities required to perform a job. of successful nonprofit leaders

4. How to develop leadership training in your organization

Leadership can make or break an organization. Leadership in nonprofit organizations presents a specific set of challenges and therefore requires a unique set of skills. Executive mentoring and leadership development training can be key to growing nonprofit core competencies among boardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization. members and volunteers alike. At the end of the day, this type of training can create a team that will better serve an organization and help them meet their goals. Whether you are interested in learning nonprofit leadership skills or exploring options for nonprofit leadership development training, here are some thoughts from Third Sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

about the importance of leadership development training in nonprofits.

Leadership and Networks

This report is written for those who run and fund leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

programs that develop and support leadership for social change. It shares many examples of how leaders using network strategies are increasing the impact of social change work (p. 3). The report provides examples of leadership models, values

Values are ideals, standards, or qualities considered worthwhile or desirable. See also “principles,” which are often shaped by values.

, skills, and behaviours needed to embrace network strategies, and recommends practical things you can do to develop network capacities (p. 8) and a network mindset (p. 10).

Risk Management A Guide for Non-profit and Charitable Organizations

The objective of this planning guide is to help managers and boardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization. volunteers to better understand the importance of risk management

Risk management involves examining a situation and 1) identifying what can go wrong, 2) identifying measures to avoid such problems, and 3) if something does go wrong, identifying steps that can be taken to lessen the negative impact. These measures may include the use of policies, procedures, and protections (such as insurance or education). Risks can be related, for example, to financial loss, workplace safety issues including abuse & physical harm or injury, property damage, or loss of reputation.

and to learn how to implement risk management policies and procedures into their organization. These practices include obtaining insurance coverage for volunteers; screening volunteers to protect clients

This term is used here to refer to the service-users that organizations work for and with and provide services to. We have chosen to use clients because of its common currency and ease of use, while acknowledging that it may unintentionally connote a particular ideology of patronage or a purely financial transactional relationships between organizations and the people they serve.

from harm; developing board orientation and training materials; developing strong employment practices; and implementing policies and procedures that protect the organization.

 

Bertrand N. and Brown L. (2006) Risk Management A Guide for Non-profit and Charitable Organizations Imagine Canada

 

Diversity in Governance: A Tool Kit for Non-Profit Boards

Diversity in GovernanceRefers to the source of strategic thinking and decisions that shape and direct an organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Includes anything related to non‐profit boards as well as strategic leadership issues. for Non-profit Boards is a comprehensive toolkit for board chairs, heads of board governance committees and independent consultants when working with boards on issues around diversity and governance. The resource highlights five sections that will guide you through the steps for increasing diversity on your organization’s board of governance and includes checklist and questionnaires for assessing board diversity. Starting the Conversation (p. 5) Developing a Board Diversity Policy (p. 8) Conducting Board Outreach and Recruitment (p.10) Creating an Effective Board (p. 15) Keeping on Track (p. 19). 

 

Maytree (2007) Diversity in Governance: A Tool Kit for Non-Profit Boards. DiverseCity The Greater Toronto Leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

Project 

Case Studies of Social Enterprise in the Ontario Non-Profit Housing Sector

This report highlights the experiences of non-profit housing providers in the development and operation of social enterprises. The report place emphasis to organizations based in Ontario in the hopes that their experiences will educate and inspire the work of others. Social enterprises are challenging and potentially rewarding for the organization and the communities that they serve Social enterprises are something that Ontario’s non-profit providers are increasingly exploring as a way of supplementing their bottom lines and funding new development and additional programming

Social Enterprise in Canada: Structural Options

 

This article adapts for Canadian readers the work of Jim Fruchterman, who discussed structural options for social enterprise from this perspective in the U.S. context. This article considers various structural options for social enterprise from the perspective of a social entrepreneur contemplating a new social venture. It addresses the issues that should be considered before deciding upon social enterprise structure, and describes available social enterprise structures and how different structures will suit different combinations of priorities.

Manwaring. M.S., Valentine. A. and Thomson. M. 2011 Social enterprise in Canada: Structural options
 

Social Enterprise in Canada: Structural Options

 

This article adapts for Canadian readers the work of Jim Fruchterman, who discussed structural options for social enterprise from this perspective in the U.S. context. This article considers various structural options for social enterprise from the perspective of a social entrepreneur contemplating a new social venture. It addresses the issues that should be considered before deciding upon social enterprise structure, and describes available social enterprise structures and how different structures will suit different combinations of priorities.

Manwaring. M.S., Valentine. A. and Thomson. M. 2011 Social enterprise in Canada: Structural options
 

Operating Reserve Policy Toolkit for Non-profit Organizations

This Toolkit was created to provide a resource to help to make a compelling case within the organization for the need to establish an operating reserve, provide factors to take into consideration in determining the size of the operating reserve for their organizations, suggest practices for managing the reserve and reporting its balance, and offer some tools with which to go about drafting a policy to record decisions.  The main body of this document defines an operating reserve, presents the rationale for creating one, and discusses a variety of issues that may affect the policy an organization ultimately creates to establish, build, manage, and maintain its operating reserve.

Sponsored by the National Center for Charitable Statistics, Center on Non-profits and Philanthropy at the Urban Institute, and United Way Worldwide

Strategic Planning and Organizational Development

This resource was developed by Pathfinder International.  Strategic planning

An activity carried out on a regular basis to clarify an organization’s purpose, goals, priorities, and a plan for reaching those goals and addressing the priorities.

is one of the most challenging – and exciting – exercises an organization can undertake. Strategic planning allows an organization to make fundamental decisions or choices by taking a long-range view of what it hopes to accomplish and how it will do so. A strategic plan is built on a thorough analysis of the organization’s existing structure, governanceRefers to the source of strategic thinking and decisions that shape and direct an organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Includes anything related to non‐profit boards as well as strategic leadership issues., staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

, program or service mix, collaborations, and resources (financial, human, technical, and material). This analysis is vital because it allows an organization to perceive which of its above aspects it must change in order to achieve its goals.

Strategic Planning and Organizational Development

This resource was developed by Pathfinder International.  Strategic planning

An activity carried out on a regular basis to clarify an organization’s purpose, goals, priorities, and a plan for reaching those goals and addressing the priorities.

is one of the most challenging – and exciting – exercises an organization can undertake. Strategic planning allows an organization to make fundamental decisions or choices by taking a long-range view of what it hopes to accomplish and how it will do so. A strategic plan is built on a thorough analysis of the organization’s existing structure, governanceRefers to the source of strategic thinking and decisions that shape and direct an organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Includes anything related to non‐profit boards as well as strategic leadership issues., staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

, program or service mix, collaborations, and resources (financial, human, technical, and material). This analysis is vital because it allows an organization to perceive which of its above aspects it must change in order to achieve its goals.

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