Board roles & responsibilities

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Human Resources Management Tools: Recruiting the Right People

Having and keeping the right people on your team makes all the difference in running a productive and successful cultural organization. This document allows you to reflect on your own contribution to your organization’s success. Your special talents – be they artistic or managerial – combined with your passion and commitment to the arts, probably played a significant role in getting your organization where it is today. It also helps you to look at the contributions of others on your team. Chances are that some or all of them brought significant talent, energy and commitment to the table.

Human Resources Management Tools: Job Descriptions 3

Although most cultural organizations have job descriptions, some smaller ones do not. But regardless of the size of your organization or your cultural sub-sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

, it pays to have a clear, definitive, written description of the content of each person’s position. A job description is a communication tool that can contribute significantly to your organization’s success in terms of giving people a clear focus and helping them to set priorities.

Human Resources Management Tools: Dealing with Challenge and Conflict

This guide developed by the Cultural Careers Council of Ontario focuses on resolving the conflicts and challenges that you face with these individuals. But the concepts apply equally well when you have to mediate a conflict between two other people who have different goals or needs. As a cultural manager you may have to handle and resolve conflicts with your employees, your superior, peer managers, BoardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization. members and patrons. 

Human Resources Management Tools: Managing Employee Performance (1)

This resource is one of six developed by the Cultural Careers Council of Ontario as part of a project involving the production of human resources management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

tools for use in the cultural sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

.
This document focuses on performance management, and how performance management systems vary enormously in their complexity – from an occasional informal chat with the employee about how their work is going, to systems with multi-page appraisal forms for different levels of staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

, with performance ratings that are linked to compensation and promotion decisions.

Financial Fitness 101 Building a Financially Healthy Not-for-Profit Organization

Financial Fitness 101 Building a Financially Healthy Not-for-Profit Organization

This resource offers some basic tools of financial management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

. The document takes you through an introduction to some of the key considerations which apply to effectively run organizations. Whether your need is to build a more financially healthy organization in order to create stronger plans to deliver on your core mission, or to access credit facilities to level out irregular revenue flows, a broader understanding of financial matters can assist. The section on budgeting  provide some approaches and support for maximizing effectiveness in using this important planning tool.

Marus, R. (2007) Financial Fitness 101 Building a Financially Healthy Not-for-Profit Organization

The Road to Financial Sustainability Planning Challenges

This article identify the key challenges of long-term financial planning, especially for those just starting the process, and described how local governments experienced in long-term planning have addressed those challenges. Long-term financial planning is a vital discipline for creating and maintaining financial sustainability. However, the article states that it requires a shift away from the short-term perspective associated with annual budgeting and towards a five- to 10-year perspective not normally associated with government financial management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

.

Kavanagh, C.  S. (2007). The Road to Financial Sustainability Planning Challenges

 

How and when to write policies and procedures

This resource is designed to help you identify when you ought to have a written policy or procedure, thereby reducing the risk of manuals so large as to be useless. It will to reduce the time commitment associated with the writing of policies and procedures, through the provision of frameworks and samples for the writing and you will be provided with a structure for reviewing your policies and procedures.]

 

D, Maree. (1999) How and when to write policies and procedures Second Edition published by ACROD Queensland Division 

Non-profit Financial Planning Made Easy

Financial planning contributes significantly to the success of a non-profit organization and allows it to better accomplish its mission. Planning tasks are challenging and too often are overlooked. In this time of shrinking governmental support for non-profit organizations, astute use of available resources following a well - developed financial plan may be the key to a
non-profit’ s survival. The concepts and techniques presented in this book can simplify the
efforts of financial managers and boardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization. members to be fiscally responsible, or accountable, to the organization ’ s private and governmental funders, to its clients

This term is used here to refer to the service-users that organizations work for and with and provide services to. We have chosen to use clients because of its common currency and ease of use, while acknowledging that it may unintentionally connote a particular ideology of patronage or a purely financial transactional relationships between organizations and the people they serve.

, to the community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

in which it operates, and to the society benefiting from its work.
 
Jody Blazek. (2008) Non-profit Financial Planning Made Easy

Financial Management of Not-for-Profit Organizations

This financial management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

for non-profit organization was created by Blackbaud. It states that the budgeting process and the ongoing management of cash and other assets are two critical areas of focus for not-for-profit financial managers. This focus is dictated by the overarching stewardship obligations of a charitable organization that receives money from the public to meet a perceived societal need.
 
 Financial Management of Not-for-Profit Organizations Blackbaud October 2011

Board Chair and Board Member Best Practice Packet

This resource was developed by Non-profit Alliance at Kellogg Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

College. It is highlights specific resources and tips for boardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization. chairs, but it can serve as a tool for the entire board to make sure all members understand the different roles and best practices

Best Practices / Good Practices / Promising Practices

Ways of working that are acknowledged as effective and deserving of emulation.

of highly effective boards.

 
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