Board roles & responsibilities

Click on any of the standards below:

The Match Game: Ensuring Fit - and Effectiveness - as a Non-Profit Board Member

 

This is a resource developed by Phyllis Yate for Bridgespan Group. Yate recommends that if you’re seriously considering joining a non-profit boardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization., it’s a good idea to make sure that your passions and unique abilities are a good match with the organization’s mission and needs. Yate stresses that even before you begin to explore becoming a board member you should be clear about how exactly you can best contribute. In this document she shares her experience as a non-profit board member and explains how she applied her professional strengths to her board roles.

Depending on the Angle: Perspectives of Conflict and Workplace Climate

This article centres on research and case studies to identify different styles of management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

and different approaches to conflict. It is premised on the idea that even though some of the same workplace issues exist in different organizations, the outcomes in terms of organizational climate may not necessarily be the same (p ii). The most salient point of this piece is the discussion portion at the end (p 62), which provides readers with an interesting and useful table linking similar workplace issues with key perspectives, management styles, and organizational climate (p 62). One interesting aspect is a management style to foster increased communication, where organizations would involve employees to open the flow of information and this ‘facilitated a high level of trust’ (p 65). It advocates for agencies to adopt a participatory approach, which views conflict as a positive force since ‘[it] can force employers to look at their own systems in order to see what they can do differently to make life easier and more functional for all parties involved (p 68).

Pike, K. (January, 2009). Depending on the Angle: Perspectives of Conflict and       Workplace Climate. 1-82. Ithaca, New York, United States.

 

Developing a Financing Strategy

This resource, developed by Civicus, is a toolkit that provides an overview for organizations looking to develop an effective financing strategy. Effective financing strategies have emerged in response to a number of emerging issues, but namely new contextual realities (including funder/donor relationships with agencies), financial sustainability, and financial autonomy (pp. 3-7). Before one develops an effective financial strategy, organizations must ensure that a number of pre-requisites are in place. Among these include: an organization strategy and budget, financial systems, public image, and value clarity (pp. 9-19). The toolkit explores developing financial strategies through earned income, which include: fee for services (pp. 24-25), sales (pp. 26-28). Lastly, an example of a financing strategy document is included, which serves as a great template for agencies (pp. 50-54) as well as a glossary of terms (p 56).

Shaprio, J; Civicus. (2011) Developing a Financing Strategy. 1-57. Washington D.C, United States.

Where, Oh Where, Did Our Membership Go?

This resource, developed by the Alberta Culture and Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

Spirit Department of the Government of Alberta, examines strategies of membership retention as well as attracting new members for non-profit organizations. First and foremost, it is important for each organization to establish the raison d’être for membership and the rationale for membership relations (p 2). The guide also provides some useful strategies for establishing goals related to membership engagement and retention (p 4) and even techniques for recruiting strategic organizations as members (5). Such techniques include training and information sessions, networking, and using the correct recruitment tools that will compel agencies to join as a member (p. 5).

Alberta Culture and Community Spirit, Government of Alberta. (2009). Where, Oh Where, Did Our Membership Go? 1-6. Edmonton, Canada. 

Building Community Wealth – A Resource for Social Enterprise Development

This resource, developed by the Canadian Centre for Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

Renewal, is a basic introduction to social enterprise, specifically by exploring how non-profit organizations are able to use business means in order to meet social goals, a ‘third system’ (pp. 12-13). The resource begins by exploring the nine dimension of social enterprise along with the various ranges within these dimensions (pp. 14-15). The resource also introduce the Development Wheel, which depicts the interdependence of the key elements in planning community economic development (pp. 35-36) and various checklists for pre-planning and agency readiness for initiating a social enterprise (pp. 40-45). Cette resource est aussi disponible ne français au site : www.cedworks.com<.

Lewis, M. (September 2006). Building Community Wealth – A Resource for Social Enterprise Development. 1-70. Burnaby, Canada. 1-70. Burnaby, BC

Act Your Age – Organizational Lifecycles and How they Impact Your Board

This resource, developed by BWB Solutions, explores the lifecycles of boardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization. of non-profit agencies and how each stage will influence the roles and responsibilities of board members, the organizational structure

Organizations can be divided into three major areas that help it to fulfill its mission: governance, work and management (Grant & Crutchfield, 2007). Governance is the source of strategic decisions that shape the organization and its work and where, ultimately, accountability lies. Work refers to the implementation of activities and tasks that must get done to fulfill the organization’s mission. Management is the link between governance and work and includes the day‐to‐day direction of tasks, people, relationships, finances, and technology to get the job done. Organizational structure refers to these 3 areas and how they interact/work together to accomplish an organization’s mission.

of the board, and addressing specific needs. The stages are as follows: infancy (start-up or start-over), juvenile (growth), adolescence (growth and decline), and maturity (established) (pp. 1-2). The guide also illustrates each stage of a board’s lifecycle with case studies to explore and better understand the inherent behaviours that occur during various development stages. With each stage, several important insights and guiding tips are offered , including a checklist for boards to determine an organization’s current phase (pp. 8-9).

Burns, M. (2010). Act Your Age – Organizational Lifecycles and How they Impact Your Board. 1-10. Branford, CT, United States.

Introduction to Social Enterprise

This resource package, developed by The Centre for Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

Enterprise, provides readers with a brief overview of social enterprise while emphasizing key concepts and recommendations for additional resources to explore. Apart from introducing the general concept of social enterprise, this resource delves into several case studies of examples of creative and innovative social enterprise ideas and practices used by some Canadian non-profit agencies (pp. 4-5). Of importance, it notes how the private sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

can contribute to the development of an agency’s social enterprise via supply chain relationships and even business mentoring (p 7). Lastly, an important visual of a ‘social enterprise path’, illustrating all the necessary steps that agencies beginning with organizational readiness to ensuring sustained growth (pp. 9-10).

The Centre for Community Enterprise. (2008). Introduction to Social Enterprise. 1-21. Port Alberni, Canada. 

The Canadian Social Enterprise Guide, 2nd Edition

This resource, developed by Enterprising Non-Profits, is a guide book/workbook geared towards agencies that are contemplating initiating a social enterprise activity that is in line with both the mission and financial needs. The various reasons of initiating a social enterprise are explored, including: diminished government funding, filling a void in the marketplace, furthering one’s mission, and as a vehicle for social innovation (pp. 4-7). Although the guide book is quite lengthy, several important templates, checklists, and case studies are offered as examples to clarify important themes and concepts. Important sections to note are idea identification and feasibility analysis (pp. 45-60) and understanding the legal context (pp. 101-121).

Enterprising Non-Profits. (August 2010). The Canadian Social Enterprise guide, 2nd Edition. 1-122. Vancouver, Canada.

Organizing Your Corporate Documents (Board Organizational Binder)

 

This resource, developed by the Muttart Foundation, is a workbook that is designed to assist boards and executive directors in organizing corporate documents in order to ensure your agency is operating in compliance with associated legislation. The resource begins by suggesting that all boards should have an organizational binder with separate tabs containing various items such as: an organizational calendar, governing statues, minutes of various meetings, and proposals and grants (to name a few) (p 6). The subsequent sections go over the contents of an organizational binder in greater depth. Lastly, an extensive legal checklist is provided for each of the 14 principle tabs in an organizational binder, which also provide a step by step process for board and executive directors to follow to ensure each section is complete (pp. 33-35).

The Muttart Foundation. (2009). Organizing Your Corporate Documents. 1-57. Edmonton, Canada.

 

Road to Accountability Handbook

This resource, developed Charity Central, an initiative of the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta, delves into the concept of accountability in the context of non-profit organizations and charities in the realm of legal compliance, ensuring programs and services are aligned with core agency values

Values are ideals, standards, or qualities considered worthwhile or desirable. See also “principles,” which are often shaped by values.

, program delivery and performance, and management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

practices (p 1). The resource opens by explaining the principles

Accepted bases of action or conduct. For the Organizational Standards Initiative, our guiding principles provide a value‐laden foundation on which our work can be based.

associated with accountability and quickly delves into the specific requirements for organizations that are registered charities and then the general legal requirements for all non-profit organizations (pp. 9-11). Numerous strategies and accountability development tools are offered to organizations, including an administrative calendar and developing core policies and management procedures in which the templates are included as appendices (pp. 23-24). Other tools and resources are provided for organizations interested in learning more about accountability in human resources management, volunteer management, and fundraising initiatives (pp. 26-29).

Charity Central. (January 2011). Road to Accountability Handbook. 1-53. Edmonton, Canada.

 

Syndicate content