Operations & Internal Systems

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The Role of an Executive Director of a Nonprofit Organization

The Role of an Executive Director of a Nonprofit Organization

What is the role of an executive director of a nonprofit organization?

Management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

 RoleExecutive directors oversee the heads of each department in a nonprofit, including marketing, fundraising, program development, HR management and accounting. Executive directors can also oversee one or more lower-level executives in larger organizations. In addition to appearing at official events, executive directors act as a liaison between their organizations and a range of external stakeholders. Directors develop and maintain relationships with other nonprofit leaders, for example, looking for opportunities to partner with other organizations to serve good causes. 

Questions to Ask About Balance Sheet and Income Statement (Balance Sheet)

This resource is a balance sheet with questions to ask about when reviewing your organizations financial statement. These questions form the basis for analysing your organizations finances. 

Emergency and Critical Incident (Sample Policy)

This sample emergency and critical incident template could be adapted to organizations as a standalone policy or as an addition to similar policy. Emergencies and critical incidents in the workplace can affect people physically and psychologically, and affect program continuity. This policy helps organizations prepare for and effectively respond to emergency situations and critical incidents through the appropriate use of resources. The prevention and effective management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

of emergency situations and critical incidents can assist to minimise the negative impact of an unexpected event.

The Many Faces of Nonprofit Accountability

This document created by Harvard Business School provides an overview of the accountability

pressures facing non-profit leaders, and examines several mechanisms available to them: disclosures, performance evaluations, self-regulation, participation, and adaptive learning. Non-profit leaders must adapt any such mechanisms to suit their organization — be it a membership-based organization, a service-delivery non-profit, or an advocacy network.

 

Ebrahim, A. The Many Faces of Nonprofit Accountability: Harvard Business School Copyright 

Felder's and Silverman's Index of Learning Styles

This resource is an Index of Learning Styles originally developed by Richard Felder and Linda Silverman and summarized by Aman Consulting. According to this model of there are four dimensions of learning styles, and individuals should think of these dimensions as a continuum with one learning preference on the far left and the other on the far right. This resource serves as a useful tool for evaluating and presenting information and how this can be communicated with stakeholders

 

Felder, R; Silverman, L. (2002). Felder's and Silverman's Index of Learning Styles. 1. Waterloo, Canada. 

Introduction to Planning and Facilitating Effective Meetings

This is a meeting planning and facilitation guide from The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which serves as an excellent guide and template for agencies that are looking to enhance in-person meeting effectiveness. It focuses on useful, practical information, such as the functions and characteristics of a facilitator (pp. 2-3), useful questions to consider when designing an agenda (p. 7), and sample meeting ground rules (p. 11). A number of important facilitation techniques are included, which are useful in order for groups to meet the objectives of a meeting (pp. 15-17).

NOAA Coastal Services Centre. (2010). Introduction to Planning and Facilitating Effective Meetings. Social Science Tools for Coastal Programs. 1-27. 

 

Employee Satisfaction with Meetings: A Contemporary Facet of Job Satisfaction

This resource takes a slightly different approach to in-person meetings, as it uses Affective Events Theory (AET) as a grounding mechanism to link the reactions of employees to meetings with overall job satisfaction (p. 151). AET suggests that “momentary affective experiences are triggered by work events that stem from features of the job, the workplace, and work-related activities (p. 151), which is critical for organizations since management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

can leverage overall employee satisfaction through meetings. The authors illustrate that meetings are not only spaces to coordinate activities and share information, but they are excellent opportunities for individuals to “demonstrate and make sense of their roles in relation to the roles others are playing” (p. 165).

Rogelberg, S; Allen, J; Shanock, L; Scott, C; Shuffler, M. (March 2010). Employee Satisfaction with Meetings: A Contemporary Facet of Job Satisfaction. Human Resources Management. 49(2). 149-172.

Conducting a Well-Managed Meeting

This resource examines meeting management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

from the healthcare sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

, though the guidelines and strategies put forth are applicable to organizations operating in the immigrant and refugee-serving sector as well. The article is divided into a logical, step by step sequence that examines meetings at 3 stages: the planning stage, the meeting stage, and the post-meeting stage (pp. 80-83). It outlines a number of considerations when handling meeting logistics and pre-meeting reception (p. 82). It also offers some important tips when meeting leaders are confronted with unproductive behaviour at both the group and individual level (p 83).

MacLeod, L. (November, 2011). Conducting a Well-Managed Meeting. Physician Executive Journal. 3(6). 80-85.

Perceived Meeting Effectiveness: The Role of Design Characteristics

This study is rooted in the importance of a strong sense of satisfaction among employees regarding meeting effectiveness since “it may also feed into overall job attitudes and well-being and affect longer-term decisions such as an individual’s intention to leave his/her job” (p. 65). The study outlines five essential design characteristics for effective meetings, which include: using an agenda, keeping minutes, punctuality, having appropriate meeting facilities, and having a chairperson/leader (p. 66), of which each of these elements is explored in greater detail.

Leach, D; Rogelberg, S; Warr, P; Burnfield, J. (February 22, 2009). Perceived Meeting Effectiveness: The Role of Design Characteristics. Journal of Business and Psychology. 24. 65-76.

 

Meeting Management and Group Character Development

This study details the fact that although managers spend approximately 75% of their time involved in meetings, few are adequately trained to properly facilitate and chair in-person meetings with staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

members (p 166). The authors introduce an excellent model for effective meeting management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

known as the PDSA Cycle, which stands for ‘plan’, ‘do’, ‘study’, ‘act’ (p. 168). The cycle is closely examined and offers managers important guidelines for actions to be taken before, during, following, and in-between meetings. A few notable charts are provided including group character traits linked with meeting stages, important in order to foster a cohesive and positive work culture (p 174).

Kloppenborg, T; Petrick, J. (1999). Meeting Management and Group Character Development. Journal of Managerial Studies. 11(2). 166-179.

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