Learning & Innovation

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SOCIAL AND SUSTAINABLE INNOVATION

SOCIAL AND SUSTAINABLE INNOVATION

In this document you will learn of:

1.     Conceptualizing sustainable development and its relation with social entrepreneurship

2.       Social Entrepreneurship and Value Generation

3.     The 3 different modalities for social innovation

Innovations are catalyzers for the development of communities, when seen as a strategy to sustain growth, by easing the means to generate an opportunity and develop a business that seeks to satisfy the needs of its environment (Petit, 2007). • Current structures can’t solve problems that affect societies, thus social entrepreneurships have found an opportunity area (Murray, Caulier-Grice & Mulgan, 2010). • By creating sustainable innovation, which can be defined as a product, service or system’s commercial introduction, new or improved, it can be compared with an analysis that shows the social and or environmental benefits (Hansen,Grosse-Dunker, 2013). Read more…

https://www.fh-ooe.at/fileadmin/user_upload/fhooe/ueber-uns/kongresswesen/2017/ccbc/docs/fhooe-ccbc2017-ppt-vargas-paulina.pdf<

SOCIAL INNOVATION AND ENTERPRISE

Social Innovation and Enterprise

The Wellesley Institute works to connect communities through innovation and enterprise. We recognize that strong, healthy and equitable communities require the active engagement of the business sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

, as well as community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

organizations and the government. Our innovation and enterprise work includes:

  • Work with private sector partners aimed at developing and supporting innovative and responsible business practices that transform communities; and,
  • Collaborations with community sector partners that aim at developing more business-like and enterprising models of service delivery to achieve greater social impact.

 

SOCIAL INNOVATION AND ENTERPRISE

Social Innovation and Enterprise

The Wellesley Institute works to connect communities through innovation and enterprise. We recognize that strong, healthy and equitable communities require the active engagement of the business sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

, as well as community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

organizations and the government. Our innovation and enterprise work includes:

  • Work with private sector partners aimed at developing and supporting innovative and responsible business practices that transform communities; and,
  • Collaborations with community sector partners that aim at developing more business-like and enterprising models of service delivery to achieve greater social impact.

 

5 Project management tips for straters

To start with good IT PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

, you need to consider some key aspects. 

5 Project Management Tips for Straters

The Following are the key aspects:

1. Initiation

2. Schedule management

3. Stake holder management

4. Change management

 5. Risk and issues management Project Initiation: Initiation is important.

One need to capture all key points and documents/This document will be shared to higher level for sign-off. Key points to include- Project scope Team who will work Identifying stakeholders. Defining requirements Project Schedule: Once you done with initiation next is to start estimation of the work involved. Have estimation is days to make scheduling an easy task. Breakdown tasks into smaller chunks - works, as it helps in better tracking. Schedule these break-up tasks. You can use tools like- MS Project, Excel or PM templates Use template to create simple project plan in MS Project Risks and Issues: After scheduling next is risk and issues key aspects. Project manager should keep track of risks and issues in project using tools to help. You can use templates to manage project risks and issues, these can be EXCEL TEMPLATES. Change Management: One of the important phase of PROJECT MANAGEMENT. Project manager should handle it and analyze impact on organization. Change management plan required when organization processes changes. There are still many reasons involved in change management t in project/organization and you can read more here. Budget management: The last but not least is Budget management key aspect. Budget management/cost management include- hardware and software , human resources and infastructure. Project budgeting are in two ways- Hourly basis and Daily basis and depends on organization or project. Reference - http://www.techno-pm.com/2014/12/project-management-for-dummies.html

Change Management Best Practices Guide

 

This Change Management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

Best Practices

Best Practices / Good Practices / Promising Practices

Ways of working that are acknowledged as effective and deserving of emulation.

Guide is designed to give general guidance to public sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

bodies undertaking change. It is not intended to be prescriptive nor exhaustive. It is not intended to be prescriptive nor exhaustive. A 'one-size-fits-all' approach to managing change is ineffective, as each public sector organisation is different, with its own structure, history, culture and needs, and each change event is different. The characteristics of each change (type, breadth, size, origin etc.) also influence the way change is planned and effectively managed.

Change Management Best Practices Guide.  The Queensland Government Chief Information Office: Retrieval date March 26, 2014

Basic Facilitation Skills

This manual provides a basic guide for those who are periodically called upon to facilitate and for those who are first time facilitators. It focuses on the role of the facilitator in relation to meetings. The document contains facilitation skills, techniques, and competencies.

Published By: The Human Leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

and Development Division of the American Society for Quality The Association for Quality and Participation. The International Association of Facilitators May 2002

Five Good Ideas about Social Innovation

Abstract retrieved from YouTubeIn this session, Al Etmanski brought the concept of social innovation to life, describing how it's a concept and strategy that challenges traditional assumptions and explaining how it can strengthen the problem solving capacity of future generations.Social innovation profoundly shifts cultural attitudes, habits, norms, relationships, hierarchy, values and the story we tell about each other. New laws, programs or funding stream, new techniques, technologies and methodologies don't in themselves guarantee profound change. The purpose of social innovation should be to substantially improve social and economic justice, otherwise it's not worth it. Etmanski, A. (February 8, 2012). Five Good Ideas about Social Innovation. Maytree Foundation. 25:54. Retrieved from Youtube.

Five Good Ideas about "Branding - Why Choose You?"

Abstract retrieved from YoutubeWe are all constantly selling - ourselves, our ideas, our recommendations and our organizations - to colleagues, bosses, direct reports, clients, politicians, bureaucrats, strategic partners, corporate sponsors and donors. This presentation provides you with a number of innovative ways to become more influential.Chamandy, I; Aber, K. (April 21, 2011). Five Good Ideas about "Branding - Why Choose You?". Maytree Foundation. 31:10. Retrieved from Youtube. 

The Sustainability Formula - How Nonprofit Organizations Can Thrive in the Emerging Economy

This resource, developed by the TCC Group, is a fascinating look at nonprofit agencies and organizational sustainability. The author begins by introducing a unique tool that assesses four core agency capacities which are as follows: adaptive capacity, leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

capacity, management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

capacity, and technical capacity (p. 2) to determine organizational resource sustainability. A number of interesting findings have emerged that indicate certain, practical steps that organizations can initiate to build sustainability mechanisms. Two sample case studies of two American organizations are offered (pp. 4-5) which illustrate that sustainable organizations exhibit particular traits. These traits include leadership from upper management that is "visionary, strategic, inclusive, decisive, inspiration, motivation, and accountable" (p. 3). It also suggests some excellent practices when working with funders (pp. 6-7) and program evaluation - namely, that organizations must become increasingly familiar and understand program management roles and responsibilities (p. 7). A sustainability formula is offered at the end of the document (p. 11) as well as 10 useful recommendations for sustainability (p. 12). 

York, P. (2012). The Sustainability Formula - How Nonprofit Organizations Can Thrive in the Emerging Economy. Tcc Group. 1-13. New York City, United States. 

 

Mapping Change: Using a Theory of Change to Guide Planning and Evaluation

This guide examines the concept of 'Theory of Change', which is offered as a process which establishes a blueprint of a roadmap for the work and anticipates its likely effects and outcomes (p 1). Theory of change is distinguished from a logic model

A visual representation or work plan of how your program works. It lists what you put into your program (resources), what you do (activities), and what you plan to achieve (outputs and outcomes).

in that a theory of change takes a much wider view of desired change and identifies preconditions that will enable and even inhibit eac possible step (p. 3). The guide also includes three important, overarching evaluation questions useful for agencies to rely upon as well as particular indicators

Evidence or measures that show that a certain condition exists or certain results have or have not been achieved. They tell you how much progress has been made toward the intended goals, objectives, outputs or outcomes. Here, indicators are the practical and measurable markers that monitor specific aspects of a standard. Meeting certain indicators means the achievement of some level of the standard.

to note (p. 5). Lastly, a useful flow chart is included which enables agencies to map the information presented in a logical sequence that can be consulted and developed at all stages of a project (p. 8).

Mackinnon, A; Amott, N; Mcgarvey, G. (2006). Mapping Change: Using a Theory of Theory of Change to Guide Planning and Evaluation.  GrantCraft. 1-12. New York City, United States.

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