Learning & Innovation

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Change Management Best Practices Guide

 

This Change Management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

Best Practices

Best Practices / Good Practices / Promising Practices

Ways of working that are acknowledged as effective and deserving of emulation.

Guide is designed to give general guidance to public sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

bodies undertaking change. It is not intended to be prescriptive nor exhaustive. It is not intended to be prescriptive nor exhaustive. A 'one-size-fits-all' approach to managing change is ineffective, as each public sector organisation is different, with its own structure, history, culture and needs, and each change event is different. The characteristics of each change (type, breadth, size, origin etc.) also influence the way change is planned and effectively managed.

Change Management Best Practices Guide.  The Queensland Government Chief Information Office: Retrieval date March 26, 2014

Basic Facilitation Skills

This manual provides a basic guide for those who are periodically called upon to facilitate and for those who are first time facilitators. It focuses on the role of the facilitator in relation to meetings. The document contains facilitation skills, techniques, and competencies.

Published By: The Human Leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

and Development Division of the American Society for Quality The Association for Quality and Participation. The International Association of Facilitators May 2002

Five Good Ideas about Social Innovation

Abstract retrieved from YouTubeIn this session, Al Etmanski brought the concept of social innovation to life, describing how it's a concept and strategy that challenges traditional assumptions and explaining how it can strengthen the problem solving capacity of future generations.Social innovation profoundly shifts cultural attitudes, habits, norms, relationships, hierarchy, values and the story we tell about each other. New laws, programs or funding stream, new techniques, technologies and methodologies don't in themselves guarantee profound change. The purpose of social innovation should be to substantially improve social and economic justice, otherwise it's not worth it. Etmanski, A. (February 8, 2012). Five Good Ideas about Social Innovation. Maytree Foundation. 25:54. Retrieved from Youtube.

Five Good Ideas about "Branding - Why Choose You?"

Abstract retrieved from YoutubeWe are all constantly selling - ourselves, our ideas, our recommendations and our organizations - to colleagues, bosses, direct reports, clients, politicians, bureaucrats, strategic partners, corporate sponsors and donors. This presentation provides you with a number of innovative ways to become more influential.Chamandy, I; Aber, K. (April 21, 2011). Five Good Ideas about "Branding - Why Choose You?". Maytree Foundation. 31:10. Retrieved from Youtube. 

The Sustainability Formula - How Nonprofit Organizations Can Thrive in the Emerging Economy

This resource, developed by the TCC Group, is a fascinating look at nonprofit agencies and organizational sustainability. The author begins by introducing a unique tool that assesses four core agency capacities which are as follows: adaptive capacity, leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

capacity, management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

capacity, and technical capacity (p. 2) to determine organizational resource sustainability. A number of interesting findings have emerged that indicate certain, practical steps that organizations can initiate to build sustainability mechanisms. Two sample case studies of two American organizations are offered (pp. 4-5) which illustrate that sustainable organizations exhibit particular traits. These traits include leadership from upper management that is "visionary, strategic, inclusive, decisive, inspiration, motivation, and accountable" (p. 3). It also suggests some excellent practices when working with funders (pp. 6-7) and program evaluation - namely, that organizations must become increasingly familiar and understand program management roles and responsibilities (p. 7). A sustainability formula is offered at the end of the document (p. 11) as well as 10 useful recommendations for sustainability (p. 12). 

York, P. (2012). The Sustainability Formula - How Nonprofit Organizations Can Thrive in the Emerging Economy. Tcc Group. 1-13. New York City, United States. 

 

Mapping Change: Using a Theory of Change to Guide Planning and Evaluation

This guide examines the concept of 'Theory of Change', which is offered as a process which establishes a blueprint of a roadmap for the work and anticipates its likely effects and outcomes (p 1). Theory of change is distinguished from a logic model

A visual representation or work plan of how your program works. It lists what you put into your program (resources), what you do (activities), and what you plan to achieve (outputs and outcomes).

in that a theory of change takes a much wider view of desired change and identifies preconditions that will enable and even inhibit eac possible step (p. 3). The guide also includes three important, overarching evaluation questions useful for agencies to rely upon as well as particular indicators

Evidence or measures that show that a certain condition exists or certain results have or have not been achieved. They tell you how much progress has been made toward the intended goals, objectives, outputs or outcomes. Here, indicators are the practical and measurable markers that monitor specific aspects of a standard. Meeting certain indicators means the achievement of some level of the standard.

to note (p. 5). Lastly, a useful flow chart is included which enables agencies to map the information presented in a logical sequence that can be consulted and developed at all stages of a project (p. 8).

Mackinnon, A; Amott, N; Mcgarvey, G. (2006). Mapping Change: Using a Theory of Theory of Change to Guide Planning and Evaluation.  GrantCraft. 1-12. New York City, United States.

Integrated Monitoring: A Practical Manual for Organisations that Want to Achieve Results

 

This resource, developed by InProgress, is a program monitoring and evaluation manual that discusses key aspect of program monitoring and important steps for conducting monitoring and evaluations. Aside from beginning by discussing what is monitoring (pp. 7-8), the manual details the various stakeholders that may be involved in the monitoring process by way of a diagram illustrating how stakeholders are not only impacted and involved with monitoring but also how they are linked together (pp. 10-12). It introduces the concept of a ‘project management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

spiral’ (p 14), in which project monitoring nurtures the acquisition of new knowledge, which is then reinvested and transforms into a virtuous spiral. A useful checklist of things to be monitored (p18) and offers important strategies for moving from output design to outcome design (pp. 20-21).

Herrero, S. (2012). Integrated Monitoring: A Practical Manual for Organisations that Want to Achieve Results. 1-44. Berlin, Germany. 

The 2002 User-Friendly Handbook for Project Evaluation

This resource, developed by the National Science Foundation, explores both quantitative and qualitative methods and lists ways for integrating such methods as part of a project evaluation strategy. It is divided into four principal sections, which include: evaluation and types of evaluation (pp. 3-13), the steps in conducting evaluation (pp. 15-42), an overview of data collection methods (pp. 43-62), and strategies that address culturally response evaluation (pp. 63-73).  Many check lists, tables, and diagrams are also included to illustrate the information presented in this handbook. A user-friendly table comparing the best times to use focus groups or in-depth interviews (p. 54) and a template for identifying key project stakeholders (p. 21) may be particularly useful for users.

Frechtling Westat, J. (January 2002). The 2002 User-Friendly Handbook for Project Evaluation. 1-86. Arlington, VA, United States.

 

Monitoring and Evaluation on a Shoestring

This resource, developed by Charities Evaluation Services (CES), provides users with a systematic approach to monitoring and evaluation and is intended to be used by executive directors, members of the boardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization., and even staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

members – those that are responsible for self-evaluation and using information to report to funders and stakeholders. Just as important as the actual task of evaluation, planning and preparing for the evaluation process is also important (pp. 6-8). A number of strategies regarding data identification and collection are explored, which include: proportionality, the availability of information on outputs, and even user satisfaction (pp. 17-21). Various data collection methods are explained in detail along with some pros and cons of each method (pp. 29-34).

Cupitt, S; Ellis, J. (2011). Monitoring and Evaluation on a Shoestring. 1-49. London, United Kingdom. 

Becoming More Effective – An Introduction to Monitoring and Evaluation for Refugee Community Organisations

This resource, developed by Charities Evaluation Services (CES) and The Refugee Council, is a guide book that provides step by step processes for organizations that operate in the Refugee and Settlement

Amongst community based immigrant and refugee serving agencies, settlement is defined as a multi‐dimensional, long‐term, dynamic process that involves a two‐way process of accommodation and adjustment between immigrants/refugees and society. Hence, settlement programs include a diverse range of services – from those focused on frontline activities that address the individual needs of immigrants and refugees to community capacity building & advocacy initiatives that address the context or conditions in which they live.

Sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

with tools to effectively monitor and evaluate their programs and the impact of their services. The guide is divided into 5 sections each providing details of one aspect of program evaluation. Numerous useful checklists and templates are provided in the guide, including a checklist for setting aims and objectives (pp. 9-12), monitoring outputs and outcomes (pp. 20-21), and even a visual model of the self-evaluation cycle (p 25). A final section that addresses frequently asked questions is also included, delving into areas such as SMART objectives, monitoring with volunteers, and technological support (pp. 27-28) and even a case study (pp. 28-29).

Charities Evaluation Services (CES); The Refugee Council. (January 2008). Becoming More Effective – An Introduction to Monitoring and Evaluation for Refugee Community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

Organisations. 1-34. London, United Kingdom.

 

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