Work Environment

[no-glossary]Click on any of the standards below:

Workplace Learning, Training and Development

Learning, Training & Development

Overview

The pace of change in the nonprofit sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

has had an impact on workplace learning. Think of the current positions in your organization and the need for increased competence in change management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

, fundraising, diversity management and so on. The CPRN report, Skills and Training in the Non-profit Sector,< explains that the need to constantly learn and develop new skills has never been greater:

"Change also puts the spotlight on training and education as a means of equipping workers with the tools they need to adapt to changing skill requirements, organizational change and increasing complexity in the external environment."

In this section of the HR Toolkit, you will find information about factors affecting learning and training, how to implement an employee development and training program, principles

Accepted bases of action or conduct. For the Organizational Standards Initiative, our guiding principles provide a value‐laden foundation on which our work can be based.

of adult education and a searchable directory of learning, training and development opportunities for people working in the sector.

In this Section:

Sample Policies on Workplace Code of Conduct

Sample Policies on Workplace Code of Conduct

This Sample taken from the Canadian Diabetes Association covers the following: 

  • Covers accountability, conflict of interest and confidentiality
  • Discusses harassment and procedures for care of the more vulnerable
  • Mentions other specific policies related to this policy
  • Outlines implementation procedures include signing a declaration (employees, volunteers)

Ontario Human Rights Code: Discrimination based on disability and the duty to accommodate: Information for Service Providers

Discrimination Based on DisabilityWhile disability is commonly understood as a restriction or lack of ability to perform an activity beyond the range of what is considered “normal”, disability rights activists challenge this definition. Instead, disability is a normal aspect of life. In fact, most people will experience some form of disability, either permanent or temporary, over the course of their lives. Rather than viewing the condition of the person as the source of the problem, an anti-oppression approach acknowledges that it is social discrimination and physical and institutional barriers that are the greatest challenge for those with disabilities. and the Duty to Accommodate: Information for Service Providers.

http://www.ohrc.on.ca/en/discrimination-based-disability-and-duty-accommodate-information-service-providers

For more information: The Ontario Human Rights Commission’s Policy on ableism and discrimination based on disability<.

The following article will assist SPOs with serving people with disabilities.

The Ontario Human Rights Code

The Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code) is the law that provides for equal rights and opportunities, and freedom from discrimination. The Code recognizes the dignity and worth of every person in Ontario. It applies to the social areas of employment, housing, goods, facilities and services, contracts, and membership in unions, trade or professional associations.

People are protected from discrimination and harassment based on “disability.” People with disabilities have the right to be free from discrimination when they receive goods or services, or use facilities. “Services” is a broad category and can include privately or publicly owned or operated services. Some examples are:

  • stores, restaurants and bars
  • hospitals and health services
  • schools, universities and colleges
  • public places, amenities and utilities such as recreation centres, public washrooms, malls and parks
  • services and programs provided by municipal and provincial governments, including social assistance and other benefits, and public transit
  • services provided by insurance companies.

People with disabilities are a diverse group, and experience disability, impairment and societal barriers in many different ways. Disabilities are often “invisible” and episodic, with people sometimes experiencing periods of wellness and periods of disability. All people with disabilities have the same rights to equal opportunities under the Code, whether their disabilities are visible or not.

“Disability” is to be interpreted broadly and includes past, present and perceived conditions.

Discrimination Based on Disability and the Duty to Accommodate: Information for Service Providers

http://www.ohrc.on.ca/en/discrimination-based-disability-and-duty-accommodate-information-service-providers

Disability

The Code protects people from discrimination and harassment because of past, present and perceived disabilities<.  “Disability” covers a broad range and degree of conditions, some visible and some not visible. A disability may have been present from birth, caused by an accident, or developed over time.

There are physical, mental and learning disabilities, mental disorders, hearing or vision disabilities, epilepsy, mental health disabilities and addictions<, environmental sensitivities, and other conditions. 

Relevant policies: 

·        Policy on drug and alcohol testing< (2016)

·        Policy on ableism and discrimination based on disability< (2016)

·        Policy on preventing discrimination based on mental health disabilities and addictions< (2014)

 

NOTE: Addictions to drugs or alcohol are considered “disabilities” under the Ontario Human Rights Code (Code). The Code prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities and perceived disabilities in employment, services, housing and other social areas.

The Ontario Human Rights Code

The Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code) is the law that provides for equal rights and opportunities, and freedom from discrimination. The Code recognizes the dignity and worth of every person in Ontario. It applies to the social areas of employment, housing, goods, facilities and services, contracts, and membership in unions, trade or professional associations.

People are protected from discrimination and harassment based on “disability.” People with disabilities have the right to be free from discrimination when they receive goods or services, or use facilities. “Services” is a broad category and can include privately or publicly owned or operated services. Some examples are:

·        stores, restaurants and bars

·        hospitals and health services

·        schools, universities and colleges

·        public places, amenities and utilities such as recreation centres, public washrooms, malls and parks

·        services and programs provided by municipal and provincial governments, including social assistance and other benefits, and public transit

·        services provided by insurance companies.

People with disabilities are a diverse group, and experience disability, impairment and societal barriers in many different ways. Disabilities are often “invisible” and episodic, with people sometimes experiencing periods of wellness and periods of disability. All people with disabilities have the same rights to equal opportunities under the Code, whether their disabilities are visible or not.

“Disability” is to be interpreted broadly and includes past, present and perceived conditions.

Discrimination

Discrimination against people with disabilities is often linked to “ableism” (attitudes in society that devalue and limit the potential of people with disabilities), prejudicial attitudes, negative stereotyping, and stigma.

Discrimination in services may happen when a person experiences negative treatment or impact because of their disability. Discrimination does not have to be intentional. And, a person’s disability needs to be only one factor in the treatment they received for discrimination to have taken place.

People with disabilities who also identify with other Code grounds (such as sex, race or age) may be distinctly disadvantaged when they try to access a service. Stereotypes may exist that are based on combinations of these identities, placing people at unique disadvantage.

Example: Women with disabilities experience unique forms of discrimination. They may be singled out as targets for sexual harassment and sexual violence due to a perception that they are more vulnerable and unable to protect themselves.

For more information: The Ontario Human Rights Commission’s Policy on ableism and discrimination based on disability<.

 

Workplace Mental Health

National Standards of Canada for psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace<

Creating a mental health system that can truly meet the needs of people living with mental health problems and illnesses and their families.

This article will inform the reader on:

What is the Standard?

The National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace (the Standard) – the first of its kind in the world, is a set of voluntary guidelines, tools and resources intended to guide organizations in promoting mental health and preventing psychological harm at work.

Launched in January 2013, it has garnered uptake from coast to coast to coast, internationally and across organizations of all sectors and sizes.

How does the Standard work?

The Standard provides a comprehensive framework to help organizations of all types guide their current and future efforts in a way that provide the best return on investment.

Adopting the Standard can help organizations with:

  • Productivity
  • Financial Performance
  • Risk Management

    Risk management involves examining a situation and 1) identifying what can go wrong, 2) identifying measures to avoid such problems, and 3) if something does go wrong, identifying steps that can be taken to lessen the negative impact. These measures may include the use of policies, procedures, and protections (such as insurance or education). Risks can be related, for example, to financial loss, workplace safety issues including abuse & physical harm or injury, property damage, or loss of reputation.

    <
  • Organizational Recruitment
  • Employee Retention

Download the Standard for free<

Download the Implementation Guide<

Read frequently asked questions (FAQ) on the Standard<

 

 

The Changing Workplaces Review https://www.labour.gov.on.ca/english/about/workplace/

About The Review

 

https://www.labour.gov.on.ca/english/about/workplace/<

Reviewing the changing nature of the workplace is part of the government's economic plan for Ontario. The four-part plan is building Ontario up by investing in people's talents and skills, building new public infrastructure like roads and transit, creating a dynamic, supportive environment where business thrives and building a secure savings plan so everyone can afford to retire.

Non-standard employment (which includes involuntary part-time, temporary, self-employment without help and multiple job holders) has grown almost twice as fast as standard employment since 1997. Private sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

services account for more than half of employment in Ontario.

The consultation on the changing workplace fulfills a commitment made in the 2014 Throne Speech< and direction in the Ministry of Labour's mandate letter<.

The Interim Report and Guide follow public consultations held in 12 cities across Ontario in 2015.

The Interim Report identifies approximately 50 issues and over 225 options of varying size and scope.

 

https://www.labour.gov.on.ca/english/about/workplace/<

From Diversity to Inclusion

  • Many organizations promote diversity while struggling to fully leverage the business benefits of a diverse workforce.
  • Nearly one-third of respondents to the Human Capital Trends global survey say they are unprepared in this area, while only 20 percent claim to be fully “ready.”
  • In a recent study, 61 percent of employees report they are “covering” on some personal dimension (appearance, affiliation, advocacy, association)1< to assimilate in their organization.2<
  • Leading companies are working to build not just a diverse workforce, but inclusive workplaces, enabling them to transform diversity programs from a compliance obligation to a business strategy.

Sexual Harassment Policy - COSTI

This sample Sexual Harassment policy was developed by COSTI. It covers implementation principles

Accepted bases of action or conduct. For the Organizational Standards Initiative, our guiding principles provide a value‐laden foundation on which our work can be based.

, fundamental principles, and definitions of sexual harassment in the workplace and complaints procedures. This document can be modified for use within other organizations and adapted into an anti-oppression

Used as an umbrella term that includes activities, practices, policies, ways of thinking, and initiatives that address oppression in all its forms (e.g. racism, homophobia, classism, ablism). Key to anti-oppression is an understanding that inequality and oppression exist in the world, and that all of us participate in unequal power dynamics in a variety of ways. Anti-oppression involves reflection and making choices about how to give, share, wield, or withhold power to assist and act in solidarity with people who are marginalized. Anti-oppression is sometimes used with the terms equity and accessibility: Anti-oppression is a broader term that includes a commitment to equity and accessibility. See both equity and accessibility.

plan.

Workplace Violence and Harassment Understanding the Law

This guide explains what every worker, supervisor and contractor needs to know about workplace violence and workplace harassment requirements in the Occupational Health and Safety Act. It describes everyone’s rights and responsibilities and answers, in plain language, the questions that are most commonly asked about these requirements. 

What is sexual Harassment?

This document provides definitions and terms and identifies inappropriate acts, gestures and attitudes that may result in sexual harassment in the workplace. 

Sexual Harassment Policy Can Save Employers Money

This resource aims to educate employer on the ramifications of incidences of sexual harassment in the workplace. It stipulates that sexual harassment in the workplace are both tangible and non-tangible and occurrence of sexual harassment in the workplace have potential cost associated, which may include staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

taking off sick time, low morale and productivity, absenteeism, high turnover and damages in the event of a successful complaint.    Giesbrecht T and Foster K Sexual Harassment Policy Can Save Employers Money  
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