Work Environment

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Self-care is Non-negotiable, Especially in the Workplace.

Self-care is non-negotiable, especially in the workplace. Impact on employee health

Our cultural obsession with work and busyness is having damaging effects on our mental and physical health. As we reported in this infographic<, fifty percent of adults work more than forty hours a week, and 75% of Americans describe their work as stressful. One way of coping with the stress is to skip work, which is what approximately one million workers do every day. Of the employees who do show up to work, 51% say they aren’t as productive because of the stress. In the long run, work-related stress and anxiety can contribute to depression, which is now the leading cause of disabilityWhile disability is commonly understood as a restriction or lack of ability to perform an activity beyond the range of what is considered “normal”, disability rights activists challenge this definition. Instead, disability is a normal aspect of life. In fact, most people will experience some form of disability, either permanent or temporary, over the course of their lives. Rather than viewing the condition of the person as the source of the problem, an anti-oppression approach acknowledges that it is social discrimination and physical and institutional barriers that are the greatest challenge for those with disabilities. worldwide.

Working too hard is also hurting our bodies. We’re spending obscene amounts of time sitting in transit, at desks, and meetings. Truck and taxi drivers have particularly sedentary schedules, as do security guards, engineers, programmers, and so on. This lack of movement is known to cause high blood pressure, obesity, increased risk of certain cancers, and musculoskeletal problems in the long run. Conversely, many of us work jobs that require a lot of heavy lifting, excessive time spent on one’s feet, noisy and/or claustrophobic environments, and other unhealthy conditions the human body wasn’t designed to endure for hours on end.

4 Steps to Creating a Healthy, Thriving Organizational Culture

4 Steps to Creating a Healthy, Thriving Organizational Culture

 

In this Article you will learn 4 Steps to Creating a Helathy, Thriving Organizational Culture

"Make your culture as important as results, your values

Values are ideals, standards, or qualities considered worthwhile or desirable. See also “principles,” which are often shaped by values.

as important as productivity. 

Your organization has stated performance expectations and works to hold everyone accountable for those expectations. What most organizations don’t have are expectations about values<, liberating rules that ensure cooperation, teamwork, validation, and (yes) fun at work."

"With both performance expectations and values expectations formally defined and agreed to, you know you’ve spelled out exactly how you want everyone to behave." Many companies say that they value one type of action<, but they would never punish a manager for violating those culture rules. Make sure that you hold everyone in your organization to the culture guidelines. If you aren't holding everyone to them, it's not your actual culture.  

 

workplace Safety Training

Workplace Safety Training: Getting Better Results

It’s no secret that while workplace safety training is critically important there are many employers who view the actual training session as an inconvenient disruption to the workday. Training sessions can take workers off their jobs resulting in a costly loss of production time but also workers may be unfocused or distracted in the training sessions due to the work responsibilities they’re missing while taking the training. This distraction can result in the workers not properly retaining the safety training information being presented, creating a potentially dangerous workplace.

The solution is not longer training sessions or more extensive testing. The key is to make the training class time more effective. By making simple changes to the way the trainers present their information, the participants can then focus on the importance of the training and better understand that safe work practices don’t end when the training session is finished.

 

Putting Your Values to Work

Putting your values

Values are ideals, standards, or qualities considered worthwhile or desirable. See also “principles,” which are often shaped by values.

to work

Your organization is trying to solve extremely complex issues. The number of people your organization is trying to help might be rising. There is pressure to raise more money, usually with limited resources. You might be dealing with workplace conflicts that go unresolved. 

If you value purpose then you can approach the decision from that perspective. You can reflect on how this new position will help you have a greater impact on your organization and those it serves.

Creating a Rewarding Volunteer Experience

Four(4) Ways to Create a  Meaningful Rewarding Experience

More than four in 10 Canadians volunteered in 2013, according to the latest General Social Survey <released earlier this year. While that’s impressive, volunteering is down since 2010, the last time the survey was conducted. That’s not terribly surprising considering a Volunteer Canada report< found that 62% of volunteers have had a negative experience. That draws the challenge for nonprofits into clear focus: How do you not only recruit volunteers, but keep them coming back?

The best way to engage volunteers is to make working with your organization a positive experience. Here are a few tips for achieving that:

Workplace Strategies for Mental Health

Workplace Mental Health: Self-care Strategies & Resources

Supporting a mentally healthy workplace within your team is important.

Managing Stress: Finding out what works for you to relieve stress in a healthy way is an important part of staying well. We're all different, and what works for one person may not work for another. Here are some suggestions:

Getting help at work

There are people at your workplace you may be able to go to for help. Here are some suggestions you may use to help these people help you.

Talking to your manager/

Talking to a human resources representative

Talking to a counselor through your Employee Assistance Plan (EAP)

1. These are the things that are a problem for me right now and here are some ideas for what might make it easier for me to do my job. Can you look at them and let me know what is possible?

2. Can we book some time to talk about my work performance? I'd like your input on how I can better manage my time, prioritize tasks, etc.

3. Can you please let me know if you notice any changes in my performance so that we can talk about it?

This document will teach you about:

  • Learning healthy ways to manage stress ·       
  • Taking care of your body 
  • Avoiding or quitting temporary fixes that can create other problems
  • Making time for yourself
  • Asking for support from family members

Workplace Learning, Training and Development

Learning, Training & Development

Overview

The pace of change in the nonprofit sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

has had an impact on workplace learning. Think of the current positions in your organization and the need for increased competence in change management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

, fundraising, diversity management and so on. The CPRN report, Skills and Training in the Non-profit Sector,< explains that the need to constantly learn and develop new skills has never been greater:

"Change also puts the spotlight on training and education as a means of equipping workers with the tools they need to adapt to changing skill requirements, organizational change and increasing complexity in the external environment."

In this section of the HR Toolkit, you will find information about factors affecting learning and training, how to implement an employee development and training program, principles

Accepted bases of action or conduct. For the Organizational Standards Initiative, our guiding principles provide a value‐laden foundation on which our work can be based.

of adult education and a searchable directory of learning, training and development opportunities for people working in the sector.

In this Section:

Sample Policies on Workplace Code of Conduct

Sample Policies on Workplace Code of Conduct

This Sample taken from the Canadian Diabetes Association covers the following: 

  • Covers accountability, conflict of interest and confidentiality
  • Discusses harassment and procedures for care of the more vulnerable
  • Mentions other specific policies related to this policy
  • Outlines implementation procedures include signing a declaration (employees, volunteers)

Ontario Human Rights Code: Discrimination based on disability and the duty to accommodate: Information for Service Providers

Discrimination Based on DisabilityWhile disability is commonly understood as a restriction or lack of ability to perform an activity beyond the range of what is considered “normal”, disability rights activists challenge this definition. Instead, disability is a normal aspect of life. In fact, most people will experience some form of disability, either permanent or temporary, over the course of their lives. Rather than viewing the condition of the person as the source of the problem, an anti-oppression approach acknowledges that it is social discrimination and physical and institutional barriers that are the greatest challenge for those with disabilities. and the Duty to Accommodate: Information for Service Providers.

http://www.ohrc.on.ca/en/discrimination-based-disability-and-duty-accommodate-information-service-providers

For more information: The Ontario Human Rights Commission’s Policy on ableism and discrimination based on disability<.

The following article will assist SPOs with serving people with disabilities.

The Ontario Human Rights Code

The Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code) is the law that provides for equal rights and opportunities, and freedom from discrimination. The Code recognizes the dignity and worth of every person in Ontario. It applies to the social areas of employment, housing, goods, facilities and services, contracts, and membership in unions, trade or professional associations.

People are protected from discrimination and harassment based on “disability.” People with disabilities have the right to be free from discrimination when they receive goods or services, or use facilities. “Services” is a broad category and can include privately or publicly owned or operated services. Some examples are:

  • stores, restaurants and bars
  • hospitals and health services
  • schools, universities and colleges
  • public places, amenities and utilities such as recreation centres, public washrooms, malls and parks
  • services and programs provided by municipal and provincial governments, including social assistance and other benefits, and public transit
  • services provided by insurance companies.

People with disabilities are a diverse group, and experience disability, impairment and societal barriers in many different ways. Disabilities are often “invisible” and episodic, with people sometimes experiencing periods of wellness and periods of disability. All people with disabilities have the same rights to equal opportunities under the Code, whether their disabilities are visible or not.

“Disability” is to be interpreted broadly and includes past, present and perceived conditions.

Discrimination Based on Disability and the Duty to Accommodate: Information for Service Providers

http://www.ohrc.on.ca/en/discrimination-based-disability-and-duty-accommodate-information-service-providers

Disability

The Code protects people from discrimination and harassment because of past, present and perceived disabilities<.  “Disability” covers a broad range and degree of conditions, some visible and some not visible. A disability may have been present from birth, caused by an accident, or developed over time.

There are physical, mental and learning disabilities, mental disorders, hearing or vision disabilities, epilepsy, mental health disabilities and addictions<, environmental sensitivities, and other conditions. 

Relevant policies: 

·        Policy on drug and alcohol testing< (2016)

·        Policy on ableism and discrimination based on disability< (2016)

·        Policy on preventing discrimination based on mental health disabilities and addictions< (2014)

 

NOTE: Addictions to drugs or alcohol are considered “disabilities” under the Ontario Human Rights Code (Code). The Code prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities and perceived disabilities in employment, services, housing and other social areas.

The Ontario Human Rights Code

The Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code) is the law that provides for equal rights and opportunities, and freedom from discrimination. The Code recognizes the dignity and worth of every person in Ontario. It applies to the social areas of employment, housing, goods, facilities and services, contracts, and membership in unions, trade or professional associations.

People are protected from discrimination and harassment based on “disability.” People with disabilities have the right to be free from discrimination when they receive goods or services, or use facilities. “Services” is a broad category and can include privately or publicly owned or operated services. Some examples are:

·        stores, restaurants and bars

·        hospitals and health services

·        schools, universities and colleges

·        public places, amenities and utilities such as recreation centres, public washrooms, malls and parks

·        services and programs provided by municipal and provincial governments, including social assistance and other benefits, and public transit

·        services provided by insurance companies.

People with disabilities are a diverse group, and experience disability, impairment and societal barriers in many different ways. Disabilities are often “invisible” and episodic, with people sometimes experiencing periods of wellness and periods of disability. All people with disabilities have the same rights to equal opportunities under the Code, whether their disabilities are visible or not.

“Disability” is to be interpreted broadly and includes past, present and perceived conditions.

Discrimination

Discrimination against people with disabilities is often linked to “ableism” (attitudes in society that devalue and limit the potential of people with disabilities), prejudicial attitudes, negative stereotyping, and stigma.

Discrimination in services may happen when a person experiences negative treatment or impact because of their disability. Discrimination does not have to be intentional. And, a person’s disability needs to be only one factor in the treatment they received for discrimination to have taken place.

People with disabilities who also identify with other Code grounds (such as sex, race or age) may be distinctly disadvantaged when they try to access a service. Stereotypes may exist that are based on combinations of these identities, placing people at unique disadvantage.

Example: Women with disabilities experience unique forms of discrimination. They may be singled out as targets for sexual harassment and sexual violence due to a perception that they are more vulnerable and unable to protect themselves.

For more information: The Ontario Human Rights Commission’s Policy on ableism and discrimination based on disability<.

 

Workplace Mental Health

National Standards of Canada for psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace<

Creating a mental health system that can truly meet the needs of people living with mental health problems and illnesses and their families.

This article will inform the reader on:

What is the Standard?

The National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace (the Standard) – the first of its kind in the world, is a set of voluntary guidelines, tools and resources intended to guide organizations in promoting mental health and preventing psychological harm at work.

Launched in January 2013, it has garnered uptake from coast to coast to coast, internationally and across organizations of all sectors and sizes.

How does the Standard work?

The Standard provides a comprehensive framework to help organizations of all types guide their current and future efforts in a way that provide the best return on investment.

Adopting the Standard can help organizations with:

  • Productivity
  • Financial Performance
  • Risk Management

    Risk management involves examining a situation and 1) identifying what can go wrong, 2) identifying measures to avoid such problems, and 3) if something does go wrong, identifying steps that can be taken to lessen the negative impact. These measures may include the use of policies, procedures, and protections (such as insurance or education). Risks can be related, for example, to financial loss, workplace safety issues including abuse & physical harm or injury, property damage, or loss of reputation.

    <
  • Organizational Recruitment
  • Employee Retention

Download the Standard for free<

Download the Implementation Guide<

Read frequently asked questions (FAQ) on the Standard<

 

 

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