Work Environment

[no-glossary]Click on any of the standards below:

A Theory-Based Measure of Conflict Management Strategies in the Workplace

 

This is a work of scholarly research that sheds important light on important conflict management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

strategies and procedures that managers can adopt and implement at the organizational level. It begins by describing some of the dimensions of conflict management theory with an emphasis on the five distinct conflict management strategies rooted in Dual Concern Theory (p 646).  The study continues by arguing that conflict management is the product of both structure (or lack of structure) and personality/emotional reactions to situations (p 664), though developing conflict management policies that note the various conflict styles can provide a much more stable framework for employees looking to address and manage conflict in the workplace.

De Dreu, C; Evers, A; Beersma, B; Luwer, E; Nauta, A. (2001). A Theory-Based Measure of Conflict Management Strategies in the Workplace. Journal of Organizational Behavior. 22. 645-668. Somerset, New Jersey, United States.

 

Internal Communications, It’s Not Rocket Science!

 

This guide has been developed specifically for managers so that they can improve their methods and the vehicles for communicating with staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

members. This piece begins by stating that effective communication procedures and behaviours stem from taking a leadership

When referring to an ‘organization’s leadership’, we mean the board, ED and senior management.

role and responsibility for affecting positive change (p 1). It then continues by listing some of tenets of effective internal communications (p 3) along with considerations for deciding upon the most effective internal communication tool(s) to use (p 7). Particularly useful is the ‘internal communications quick guide’ which lists a description of different forms of communication, why it is important, and when or how often to use when working with employees (pp 9-17).

Communications Nova Scotia. (2006). Internal Communications, It’s Not Rocket Science! Province of Nova Scotia. 1-60. Halifax, Canada

Canadian Diabetes Association Code of Conduct

The Canadian Diabetes Association’s Code of Conduct is a policy that serves as a great example and template for agencies looking to develop or review their own code of conduct. This work is simple and concise though it is well organized and divided into distinct categories. It begins by drawing upon the vision, mission and organizational culture of the Canadian Diabetes Association (p 1) and continues with provisions for ensuring accountability (p 1). One of the most salient points of the code of conduct is a clause regarding its implementation and monitoring (p 3). Agencies will find this code useful as it adopts a proactive approach and directly lists responsibilities that lie at both the individual and agency level.

Canadian Diabetes Association. (2012). Code of Conduct. HR Council. 1-3. Toronto, Canada.

 

Ethics Toolkit

This resource, developed by the Ethics Resource Center, is available in an online format and provide non-profit agencies with a number of sample and practical guides related to developing effective staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

codes of conduct and ethics policies for staff and boardYour board of directors provides governance to your organization. members. Included within the toolkit is a glossary of terms, which is quite useful for agencies interested in defining key and important terms for inclusion, along with a number of common provisions for an organizations’ code of ethics. The toolkit highlights several important sub-policies and procedures that form the basis of a staff and organizational code of conduct including: employment practices, conflicts of interest, employment practices, and even environmental issues.

 

Brown, J . (May 29, 2009). Ethics Toolkit. Ethics Resource Center. Arlington, Virginia, United States.  Retrieved from www.ethics.org<.

 

The Critical Role of Conflict Resolution in Teams

 

This resource explores some of the linkages between various strategies for managing different forms of conflict and overall group performance and the sense of individual and group satisfaction. The article begins by focusing on core components of the conflict management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

process (p 171) but wanted to extend the current research further by delving into specific conflict resolution strategies employed by groups and determine their effect on overall performance and satisfaction. The article illustrates some of its findings through the use of conflict concept mapping, in order to map out the various strategies employed and their effects (p 177). There is also interesting insight to shared group norms and understandings that correlate to a group performance and satisfaction, which may be useful for managers looking to cultivate certain norms and values

Values are ideals, standards, or qualities considered worthwhile or desirable. See also “principles,” which are often shaped by values.

within teams to ensure high levels of engagement and satisfaction in order to minimize conflict (p 180).

Behfar, K; Mannix, E; Trochim, W; Peterson, R. (2008). The Critical Role of Conflict Resolution in Teams: A Close Look at the Links Between Conflict Type, Conflict Management Strategies, and Team Outcomes. Journal of applied psychology. 93(1). 170-188.

 

Managing Disruptive Employee Behaviours

 Abstract provided by Viemo Most managers can easily identify an employee performance issue, but what is difficult is effectively communicating this information. From the employee’s perspective when their manager does initiate a discussion it can come across as finger-pointing and disciplinary. Naturally this approach causes most people to react defensively, leading to a confrontational exchange and a strained relationship. It can seem easier to avoid these conversations altogether, particularly when the issue relates to difficult to quantify and discuss behavior based issues. This session will teach an intuitive process for crafting… performance feedback talking points to drive the change you are seeking while avoiding the difficulties that usually accompany these exchanges. Gain practical skills to confidently take on those seemingly awkward yet critical exchanges in a far less stressful way.Resker, J. (May 9, 2012). Managing Disruptive Employee Behaviours. 1:00:06. Retrieved from nonprofitwebinars.com 

Guide to Planning Inclusive Meetings

This resource, developed by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, can serve as a guide to meetings that ensure inclusiveness and the removal of barriers in order to ensure the unrestricted and full participation of each individual present. The guide begins by offering strategies for selecting the appropriate venue while ensuring facilities are accessible and even planning safety and evacuation procedures (p. 5-7). Specific tips are offered for those conducting the meeting, including organizers, chairpersons, and presenters (pp. 9-14). An extensive accessibility

The degree to which organizations and their services can be accessed by as many diverse people as possible. Whether something is accessible can depend, for example, on service design, organizational climate and culture, physical structures. Accessibility is related to the concept of ‘barriers,’ which are practices, structures, attitudes, and other things that block access. See also the definition of anti-oppression.

checklist for planners is included that covers several important aspects of planning a meeting, including preliminary budget planning, scheduling considerations, meeting facility, and event registration (pp. 35-53). Lastly, a list of service providers and organizations  are included for agencies looking for additional resources and specific sources of information, including: the Canadian Abilities Foundation (CAF), the Canadian hearing Society (CHS), Employment EquityEquity is about fairness, justice, access to equal opportunity, recognizing inequalities and taking steps to address them. It requires eliminating barriers to economic, social and political opportunities and access to services. See also anti-oppression. Policy, and the Mental Health Commission of Canada (pp. 21-33).

 

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. (2009). Guide to Planning Inclusive Meetings. 1-56. Gatineau, QC, Canada.

 

Team-Building and Participation: Guide to Tips on Principles and Practices

This resource, developed by Gather the People, provides excellent insight into how executive directors and managers can cultivate teamwork and effective, internal collaboration among staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

members. Not only is teamwork essential for developing an inclusive and supportive workplace culture but it is often one of the most important variables in successful professional practice (p 1). The resource begins by offering strategies for developing effective and cohesive teams by focusing on core team values

Values are ideals, standards, or qualities considered worthwhile or desirable. See also “principles,” which are often shaped by values.

and some indisputable laws of teamwork (pp. 6-8). While it remains important for agencies to invest in team-building, this resource explains how team building can be productive activities and ways to structure team building activities into more formalized, engagement processes (pp. 11-12). 

Ben Asher, M; bat Sarah, K. (2009). Los Angeles, United States.

 

For Cultural Competence: Knowledge, Skills and Dispositions Needed to Embrace Diversity – A Resource Manual for Developing Cultural Competence

 

This resource, developed by the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE), is a resource manual that explores the components cultural competence and how individuals can enhance their knowledge and skill competencies to improve staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

relations and contribute to an overall positive work environment. The guide begins by exploring the concept of cultural competence and progresses to discuss various strategies for developing cultural competence (pp. 54-58) and a strategy toolkit for integrating knowledge and awareness to enhance cultural competence (pp. 86-87). Lastly, a variety of training exercises related to understanding cultural competence and building cultural competencies of individuals are included that can be utilized in agencies as part of meetings and team building exercises (pp. 111-140).

Stith-Williams, V; Haynes, P. (05 September, 2007). For Cultural Competence: Knowledge, Skills and Dispositions Needed to Embrace Diversity – A Resource Manual for Developing Cultural Competence. 1-187. Richmond, Virginia, United States.

 

 

Cultural Competency Self-Assessment for Public Interest Leaders

 

This resource, developed by The Maryland Association of Non-Profit Organizations, is a checklist intended for Executive Directors and Program Managers to gauge one’s understanding of cultural competencies and how it is put into practice in one’s work. For the purposes of the checklist, the author has included a broad definition of culture as a guide for those utilizing the checklist (p 1). The checklist is divided into three distinct sections each designed to gauge one’s understanding and the practice of cultural competence for a total of 40 questions. A scoring formula is listed at the end of the document so individuals can gauge their cultural competence as beginning, emerging, proficient, or exceptional (p 7).

Rouson, B; Iliff, H. (2011). Cultural Competency Self-Assessment for Public Interest Leaders. 1-7. Baltimore, United States. 

 

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