Hiring, Deployment, Engagement & Retention

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Diversity and Inclusion: Valuing the Opportunity

This resource is provides information on diversity and inclusion as emerging values

Values are ideals, standards, or qualities considered worthwhile or desirable. See also “principles,” which are often shaped by values.

and priorities in the workplace across sectors and industries. Topics covered in this resource includes:  Size matters: Large organizations are twice as likely to recruit for diversity (p. 5- 7) Defining the Challenge (p. 8-10) Imagining the Solution (p. 11- 18)

 

Building Peace within Non-profit Organizations

Conflict competence is essential to create energetic organizations with strong relationships between staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

, volunteers, members, partners, funders and other stakeholders. It improves morale, clarity of purpose and allows the non-profit to work with greater strength to achieve its goals. This article shares some of the common sources of tension and conflict within non-profit and voluntary organizations. These observations are also based on findings from 16 experts -- eight non-profit leaders and eight consultants who work with this sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

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Peringer. C. (2005) Building Peace within Nonprofit Organizations

Human Resources Management: Best Practices in the Cultural Sector

This resource developed by the Cultural Careers Council of Ontario identifies small cultural organizations that have succeeded, at least to some degree, in implementing exemplary human resource management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

best practices

Best Practices / Good Practices / Promising Practices

Ways of working that are acknowledged as effective and deserving of emulation.

, and disseminate these practices to the broader cultural community

The broad group of people who are stakeholders of an organization. Extending beyond the people that enter our buildings and use our services, an organization’s community may include cultural groups, sectoral partners, and other groups of people joined together by common identity, geography, and other bonds. Often where we use ‘community’ the word is actually short for multiple communities.

for them to replicate wherever possible. The resource includes best practices in retaining and rewarding staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

, HR policy manual, training and development, managing staff performance.

NetGain Partners Inc. (n.d.) Human Resources Management: Best Practices in the Cultural Sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

Retrieval date: May 27, 2014

Human Resources Management Tools: Recruiting the Right People

Having and keeping the right people on your team makes all the difference in running a productive and successful cultural organization. This document allows you to reflect on your own contribution to your organization’s success. Your special talents – be they artistic or managerial – combined with your passion and commitment to the arts, probably played a significant role in getting your organization where it is today. It also helps you to look at the contributions of others on your team. Chances are that some or all of them brought significant talent, energy and commitment to the table.

Human Resources Management Tools: Job Descriptions 3

Although most cultural organizations have job descriptions, some smaller ones do not. But regardless of the size of your organization or your cultural sub-sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

, it pays to have a clear, definitive, written description of the content of each person’s position. A job description is a communication tool that can contribute significantly to your organization’s success in terms of giving people a clear focus and helping them to set priorities.

Human Resources Management Tools: Managing Employee Performance (1)

This resource is one of six developed by the Cultural Careers Council of Ontario as part of a project involving the production of human resources management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

tools for use in the cultural sector

Used broadly to define a group or cluster of agencies that share some commonality. Here ‘the sector’ refers to community based agencies that serve immigrants and refugees in Ontario. Other relevant sectors include the broader non‐profit sector (sometimes referred to as the voluntary sector), and the community social services sector.

.
This document focuses on performance management, and how performance management systems vary enormously in their complexity – from an occasional informal chat with the employee about how their work is going, to systems with multi-page appraisal forms for different levels of staff

For our purposes, staff refers to agency employees who are neither managers nor executive directors.

, with performance ratings that are linked to compensation and promotion decisions.

How Non-profit Organizations Manage Risk

The purpose of this document is to identify the kinds of decisions where non-profit organizations need to manage their risks in a strategic fashion, to review what is known about how they approach these decisions, and to offer a conceptual framework that non-profits can use to develop a more sophisticated and effective approach to their risk-management

Includes an organization’s Executive Director and managers, but not staff or supervisors. See also definition for “staff.”

decisions.

Dennis R. Young. How Non-profit Organizations Manage Risk

Integrating Evaluative Capacity into Organizational Practice (Evaluation)

This resource was developed by The Bruner Foundation. It aims to help organizations build evaluative capacity—the capacity to do evaluation, to commission evaluation, and to think evaluatively.

Anita M. Baker and Beth Bruner (2010) Integrating Evaluative Capacity into Organizational Practice

Social Media in the Workplace

 

This resource sheds light on the phenomenon of organizations and employers relying on and utilizing social media as part of the hiring and pre-employment screening processes and the implications of such behaviour. The article begins by outlining that social media can provide employers with valuable information regarding prospective candidates (p. 1), though this may positively and negatively influence a hiring decision (pp. 1-2). The issue of privacy concerns is brought forth and even though there have been no court decisions yet concerning any liability on the part of employers, “it is no guarantee that such liability will not be imposed in the future” (p. 3). The article provides organizations with smart and useful strategies should social media be incorporated as part of a pre-screening process and the potential implications (pp. 1-4).

Johnson, E. (July 22, 2010). Social Media in the Workplace. Whiteford, Taylor & Preston. 1-4. Baltimore, United States. 

Non-Profit Human Resources – Don’t Make this Mistake When Hiring for Your Non-Profit

 

This resource, developed by the organization i Start a Non-Profit, provides some great information and advice when looking to hire personnel in a non-profit organization. The article stresses the importance of looking beyond the credentials of candidates and considering commitment to the position and organization (p 1). Numerous links to additional guides and articles related to human resources are also embedded in the article that offer additional tips and insights.

Wagner, Bret. (2012). Non-Profit Human Resources – Don’t Make this Mistake When Hiring for Your Non-Profit. 1-2. Madison, WI, United States. 

 

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